This Game of Thrones Theory Says Podrick’s Song Predicts Arya’s Death

Abby Gardner

This week's episode of Game of Thrones had an ominous cloud hanging over it. (Warning: Spoilers for the episode ahead.) Both the viewers and the characters alike know that the Night King and the Army of the Dead are (probably) making their way to them, and the Battle of Winterfell is looming. Because of that, there were so many scenes that could be interpreted as goodbyes as characters gathered together on the eve of their toughest fight yet.

Oh, and then there was that morbid song, "Jenny of Oldstones," that Podrick sang. It served as a real mood dampener, no?

Yahoo has laid out an interesting theory about what the song actually means for many of the characters, including fan favorite Arya Stark.

HBO

But first, let's look at the lyrics:

High in the halls of the kings who are gone,

Jenny would dance with her ghosts:

the ones she had lost and the ones she had found

and the ones who had loved her the most;

the ones who’d been gone for so very long

she couldn’t remember their names.

They spun her around on the damp cold stone,

spun away all her sorrow and pain.

And she never wanted to leave,

never wanted to leave.

The theory is not just about the lyrics, which seem to be about death, but the montage we saw as they were sung: It showed Gilly, Sam and Little Sam, Theon and Sansa, Gendry and Arya, Grey Worm and Missandei, and Jorah. At first glance, the groupings and shots seem to reveal a glimpse of characters preparing in different ways for battle.

But Yahoo posits that what we really saw was a number of characters at the end of their journey. For example, Gilly figured out the final clue about Jon and now possesses that knowledge as well. Theon has found forgiveness. Grey Worm and Missandei are dreaming of seeing the beaches again in the future, which seems like a bad sign.

Then there's Arya and Gendry. "Of the two of them, Arya’s closest to completing her journey. She seems to have killed everyone on her list she wants to kill (note that the list comes up in the episode, and it’s clear she’s not as focused on it as she once was)," Yahoo writes. "She’s been reunited with her family, she’s been forgiven by the Hound for leaving him for dead, she’s even found love in the arms of Gendry, completing that arc."

But remember that shot of Arya running through the crypts in the trailer for episode three? That seems significant now too. The characters all seem to think the crypts are safe—but if the Night King raises the dead of Winterfell, they're going to be in big trouble and Arya could die there. The lyrics mention "names" and of course Arya keeps a famous list of names: her kill list. She's also associated with dancing—she "water dances" when she fights, which could tie in with the lyric "dance with her ghosts." Arya's ancestors are buried in that crypt, so they could be "the ones who loved her most" in the song.

What if, somehow, her mother, Catelyn Stark—as Lady Stoneheart—is the one who kills her? Gah!

Needless to say, now we're really nervous. Is it Sunday yet?