Georgia prosecutor investigating Trump will go quiet this week to avoid the appearance of influencing the election. But indictments can come as early as December, per report

Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis.
Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis.John Bazemore/AP
  • Trump and his associates are being probed for attempts to subvert Georgia's 2020 election results.

  • Fulton County DA Fani Willis previously said people could face prison sentences for the allegations.

  • The DA's team is preparing to make moves after Election Day, CNN reported.

Developments in Georgia's special grand jury probe into Donald Trump and his associates may not come before the midterms, but indictments could be handed out by December, according to CNN.

Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis has been leading an investigation into attempts by Trump and his allies to interfere with Georgia's 2020 election results since February 2021. Among the allegations include a scheme to send a fake slate of electors to the state Capitol to overturn the results.

Willis told The Washington Post in mid-September that the "allegations are very serious" and that "people are facing prison sentences" if they are indicted and convicted.

But a major move like that won't come by the midterms on November 8. CNN reported that Willis said her office will go dark in terms of any pivotal updates on this case starting later this week to avoid the appearance of swaying the elections.

Instead, anonymous sources familiar with the investigation told the outlet that any significant activity such as indictments could begin by December.

"I think her hands are tied, certainly, until after the midterms," Michael J. Moore, a former US attorney for the Middle District of Georgia, told CNN. "She wants to pull some of the politics out of it, so to ensure that the investigation is not forgotten, instead of sort of rattling the sabers and subpoenaing other witnesses you would just say you know we're going to take this time to reflect on the investigation."

Since the beginning of the grand jury probe, prosecutors have issued a slew of subpoenas to Trump's allies and state officials, including to Sen. Lindsey Graham and Trump legal advisers John Eastman, Kenneth Chesebro, Cleta Mitchell, and Jenna Ellis.

Boris Epshteyn, another Trump lawyer, and former Chief of Staff Mark Meadows have also testified before the grand jury.

The county district attorney has yet to make a decision on seeking testimony from Trump.

At the outset of the investigation was a call two days before the January 6 Capitol Riot, when Trump pressured Georgia secretary of state Brad Raffensperger to "find" additional votes to help the former president win the state.

The investigation has since expanded to examining an alleged scheme to send the slate of electors that could overturn the state's election results.

A spokesperson from the district attorney's office could not immediately return a request for comment.

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