The Glock 39 Gun Might Be Small But It Will Demand Your Respect

Kyle Mizokami

Kyle Mizokami

Security,

Here's why.

The Glock 39 Gun Might Be Small But It Will Demand Your Respect

In the early twenty-first century, industry cooperation between the CCI/Speer ammunition company and Glock lead to the creation of a new caliber, .45 GAP. GAP stood for Glock Automatic Pistol and was meant as an alternative to the nearly century-old .45 ACP. Although things didn’t exactly work out that way, the .45 GAP is still a viable cartridge for shooters who want power with less recoil.

The .45 GAP round was released in November 2002 by CCI/Speer. The round was developed by Ernest Dunham in response to a request by Glock for a round that had the same overall length as the 9-millimeter Luger while packing the raw power of .45 ACP. 9mm Luger, also known as 9x19, has an overall length of 29 millimeters, to the .45 ACP’s 32 millimeters.

Although Glock was already branching into new calibers, including .40 Smith & Wesson, such a new round would allow compact and subcompact pistols to carry a high firepower round while keeping overall length—particularly grip length—down. Grip comfort is a key consideration in choosing a firearm, and too wide a grip can send shooters looking for something else.

The Glock 39 is one of the company’s smallest pistols on the market. The has an overall length of just 6.5 inches, a height of 4.17 inches, and a slide width of just 1.12 inches. The barrel is 3.43 inches long and the entire pistol, with empty magazine, weighs just 1 pound 8 ounces.

Read full article