GOP Senator Says He Was Elected Fair And Square In 2020 But Won't Admit Biden Was

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Sen. Roger Marshall (R-Kan.) on Sunday baselessly cast doubt on the integrity of the 2020 election, though he insisted that his own victory in Kansas was earned “fair and square.”

Marshall, who was among the 147 Republicans who voted to overturn the 2020 election even after the U.S. Capitol riot on Jan. 6, was asked by MSNBC’s Chuck Todd on “Meet the Press” if he regretted that decision now.

“Look, I’m always going to stand up for election integrity,” Marshall said, adding that he would continue to fight for more “safety valves” and “higher levels of integrity” in U.S. elections.

“Do you believe you were elected fair and square in 2020?” Todd asked.

“You know, absolutely I do. I think Kansas has some of the tightest election laws in the land,” Marshall said.

“And do you believe that Joe Biden was elected fair and square?” Todd added.

You know, Joe Biden was sworn into office. I called him Mr. President since the day he was ... sworn in,” Marshall said, failing to answer the question. “I still remain concerned about election integrity.”

Despite dogged efforts by former President Donald Trump and his allies to unearth evidence of widespread electoral fraud in the 2020 election, and an ongoing disinformation campaign about it, not a scintilla has materialized.

And although the vote was more than a year ago and scores of audits and lawsuits have affirmed the results, polls continue to show that a majority of Republicans say Biden was not legitimately elected.

Republican-led state legislatures around the country have since made considerable efforts to tighten voting laws and make it harder for people to vote, citing the need for election security.

Kansas was among the states to do so.

This article originally appeared on HuffPost and has been updated.