Grammys 2020: Ozzy Osbourne pledges to go on tour despite Parkinson’s diagnosis in red carpet interview

Clémence Michallon
Ozzy Osbourne and Kelly Osbourne attend the 62nd Annual Grammy Awards at Staples Center on 26 January 2020 in Los Angeles, California: Frazer Harrison/Getty Images for The Recording Academy

Ozzy Osbourne opened up about his Parkinson’s diagnosis on the Grammys red carpet on Sunday night.

The singer attended the ceremony accompanied by his daughter Kelly, who stood by his side as he spoke from the red carpet.

Osbourne, 71, revealed earlier in the week on Good Morning America that he has been diagnosed with a form of Parkinson’s disease.

On the Grammys red carpet, he said 2019 was “one rock and roll of a year”.

He mentioned that he had to undergo neck surgery and his Parkinson’s diagnosis also came up.

Leaning on a cane, Osbourne said he was still planning on going on tour if he’s well enough to do so.

He explained with his daughter’s help that he’s been attending physical therapy every day in order to get there, and that he’s currently “doing the best [he] can”.

Kelly praised him for his progress, highlighting how far her father has come despite his health woes.

It was a big family night for the Osbournes, as Sharon was also present as a host on the red carpet, conducting interviews with various A-listers throughout the evening.

You can catch up on the biggest Grammys talking point here and view a full list of winners here.

  • Liberty University students choose sides after fallout from coronavirus reporting
    Yahoo News

    Liberty University students choose sides after fallout from coronavirus reporting

    The New York Times reported this week that almost a dozen Liberty University students have come down with COVID-19 symptoms since the school reopened last week, according to a bombshell article published Sunday that cites a local physician in Lynchburg, Va., where the evangelical university is situated. “We've lost the ability to corral this thing,” Dr. Thomas W. Eppes Jr. said he told Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr., according to the article. The Times identified Eppes as the head of the school's student health service, but he does not appear on the Liberty University website and a school spokesman told Yahoo News he has no official connection to the university.

  • Trump doubles U.S. military assets in Caribbean, bolstering drug fight after Maduro indictment
    Reuters

    Trump doubles U.S. military assets in Caribbean, bolstering drug fight after Maduro indictment

    The Trump administration said on Wednesday it was deploying more U.S. Navy warships and aircraft to the Caribbean to prevent drug cartels and "corrupt actors" like Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro from exploiting the coronavirus pandemic to smuggle more narcotics. President Donald Trump said he was doubling U.S. military resources in the region, including destroyers, surveillance planes and personnel, in an anti-drug crackdown to deal with what he called a "growing threat." The beefed-up operation - quickly dismissed by the Maduro government - will also call for sending Navy ships closer to Venezuela, according to a U.S. official and two people familiar with the matter, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

  • PA Man ‘Upset Over Coronavirus’ Shoots Girlfriend Before Turning Gun on Himself: Cops
    The Daily Beast

    PA Man ‘Upset Over Coronavirus’ Shoots Girlfriend Before Turning Gun on Himself: Cops

    A Pennsylvania man “extremely upset” about losing his job amidst the coronavirus pandemic allegedly shot his girlfriend, before turning the gun on himself in an attempted murder-suicide, authorities said Wednesday. The Wilson Borough Police Department said in a statement to The Daily Beast that Roderick Bliss IV, 38, attempted to fatally shoot his girlfriend with a semi-automatic pistol on Monday afternoon, before dying by suicide, after he “had become increasingly upset over the COVID-19 pandemic. The 43-year-old girlfriend, who was shot once in the back, survived the attack and is in St. Luke's hospital with non-life-threatening injuries.

  • Navy says it can't empty Roosevelt amid coronavirus because of its weapons, nuclear reactor
    USA TODAY

    Navy says it can't empty Roosevelt amid coronavirus because of its weapons, nuclear reactor

    WASHINGTON – The coronavirus outbreak aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt escalated Wednesday as more sailors tested positive for the virus and U.S. Navy officials scrambled to respond to the desperate evacuation plea from the aircraft carrier's captain. As of midday Wednesday, 93 crew members had tested positive for the virus, and 593 tested negative, Thomas Modly, acting Secretary of the Navy, told reporters during a briefing Wednesday. There are approximately 5,000 crew members on board.

  • North Korea insists it is free of coronavirus
    AFP

    North Korea insists it is free of coronavirus

    North Korea remains totally free of the coronavirus, a senior health official in Pyongyang has insisted, despite mounting scepticism overseas as confirmed global infections near one million. The already isolated, nuclear-armed North quickly shut down its borders after the virus was first detected in neighbouring China in January, and imposed strict containment measures. Pak Myong Su, director of the anti-epidemic department of the North's Central Emergency Anti-epidemic Headquarters, insisted that the efforts had been completely successful.

  • 28 Texas spring breakers who just returned from Cabo have tested positive for the coronavirus
    Business Insider

    28 Texas spring breakers who just returned from Cabo have tested positive for the coronavirus

    Victor Ruiz Garcia/Reuters Twenty-eight Texas spring breakers who recently vacationed in Cabo have tested positive for the coronavirus, tweeted Tony Plohetski of local station KVUE-TV. They chartered a plane with 70 people to get to Cabo, he said. Spring breakers, who are Gen Z, have been called out for crowding beaches and partying on booze cruises and ignoring calls for social distancing during the coronavirus pandemic.

  • Lindsey Graham Calls on IG Horowitz to Testify in Further FISA Hearings after Scathing New Report
    National Review

    Lindsey Graham Calls on IG Horowitz to Testify in Further FISA Hearings after Scathing New Report

    Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham (R., S.C.) plans to call DOJ inspector general Michael Horowitz to testify before congress regarding his office's audit of the FBI's FISA application process, which was released Tuesday and revealed potentially systematic abuses of the transparency measures required of the Bureau when agents interact with the FISA court. I have just been briefed on Inspector General Horowitz's audit of FISA applications involving American citizens. This random audit shows discrepancies regarding verification of the information under the Woods Procedures,” Graham said in a press release.

  • Differing death tolls in California and Louisiana hint at the urgency to 'flatten the curve'
    NBC News

    Differing death tolls in California and Louisiana hint at the urgency to 'flatten the curve'

    The two states have instituted increasingly restrictive measures and are among the 23 states with stay-at-home orders. Both states are led by Democratic governors who have earned praise from President Donald Trump for their response to the crisis. The disease is still spreading in both states, and the number of new cases and deaths reported each day is still climbing.

  • Iran parliament speaker, Israeli health minister have virus
    Associated Press

    Iran parliament speaker, Israeli health minister have virus

    Iran's parliament speaker has contracted the coronavirus, the country's highest-ranking government figure yet to catch the disease, while in Israel, several top officials entered quarantine when the health minister tested positive on Thursday. Iran's parliament announced Ali Larijani's illness on its website, saying he was receiving treatment in quarantine. Iran, the regional epicenter of the coronavirus, has been fighting one of the world's worst outbreaks.

  • Some Nuclear Submarine Crews May Not Even Know About the Pandemic
    Popular Mechanics

    Some Nuclear Submarine Crews May Not Even Know About the Pandemic

    On the flip side, a former nuclear submarine commander with the French Navy says the country's strategic nuclear submarine crews are probably unaware the pandemic is taking place. Since the viruses' detection in December 2019, the COVID-19 virus has quickly spread across the globe, with 826,222 infections recorded worldwide. It's hard to imagine a place now where the pandemic never happened, and where people are unaware it is taking place.

  • CDC warned of a coming pandemic two years ago
    Yahoo News Video

    CDC warned of a coming pandemic two years ago

    Two years ago, some of the nation's top public health officials gathered in an auditorium at Emory University in Atlanta to commemorate the 1918 influenza pandemic — also known as “the Spanish flu” — which had killed as many as 40 million people as it swept the globe.

  • Coronavirus turned the 2020 presidential race upside down, but not in Wisconsin
    LA Times

    Coronavirus turned the 2020 presidential race upside down, but not in Wisconsin

    Wisconsin, the next state to head to the polls, has done neither. State officials have urged voters to request absentee ballots by Thursday, leading to application numbers that have far surpassed both the 2016 presidential primary and general election. The state reported Wednesday that a record-setting 1,053,556 voters had requested absentee ballots.

  • Latest on the spread of the coronavirus around the world
    Reuters

    Latest on the spread of the coronavirus around the world

    Cases rose by 6,156, compared with the previous day and the death toll climbed by 140. Italy will extend lockdown restrictions to April 13, as data from this week suggests a slowdown of growth in total cases, though its national health institute says official death toll could be underestimated. Cases in Spain topped 100,000 on Wednesday, and two planes with protective equipment arrived to restock an overloaded public health system.

  • Trump: There Would Be ‘Death All Over’ If We’d Decided to Just ‘Ride It Out’
    The Daily Beast

    Trump: There Would Be ‘Death All Over’ If We’d Decided to Just ‘Ride It Out’

    After spending weeks downplaying the threat of the novel coronavirus, President Trump on Tuesday admitted that at least 100,000 Americans will likely die but said it would have been worse if he had listened to some people he claimed had great “common sense” who wanted to “just ride it out. It was not immediately clear who he was referring to, but the president himself had been pushing to loosen restrictions over the virus until just days ago, having suggested as recently as last week that, despite fatalities from the coronavirus health crisis growing, Americans could start to get back to normal by Easter since “we never turn the country off” for the flu.

  • Army attack helicopters teamed up with Navy ships to practice holding enemies 'at high risk' in the Middle East
    Business Insider

    Army attack helicopters teamed up with Navy ships to practice holding enemies 'at high risk' in the Middle East

    US Navy/MCS 3rd Class Matthew F. Jackson In March, US Navy surface ships, including a destroyer, worked with Army Apache helicopters to practice responding to threats at sea. The addition of Army aircraft expands the Navy's ability to do reconnaissance and to hold threats at bay, a Navy officer said. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

  • Japan expands ban on visitors as virus cases climb
    AFP

    Japan expands ban on visitors as virus cases climb

    Japan will bar visitors from the United States, China and most of Europe, the prime minister said Wednesday, as the country seeks to stem a recent rise in coronavirus cases. The entry ban, which will also apply to Australia, Britain, South Korea and many Southeast Asia countries, will take effect on Friday, Shinzo Abe's government said. Japan had already barred arrivals from parts of several European nations, China and South Korea.

  • Brazil: Amazon land defender Zezico Guajajara shot dead
    BBC

    Brazil: Amazon land defender Zezico Guajajara shot dead

    A member of a protected tribe in the Amazon has been killed by gunmen, authorities in the Brazilian state of Maranhao say. The body of Zezico Guajajara, of the Guajajara tribe, was found near his village on Tuesday. The former teacher was a supporter of Guardians of the Forest, a group formed to combat logging gangs in the area.

  • 12 Buildings That Show the Beauty of Deconstructed Architecture
    Architectural Digest

    12 Buildings That Show the Beauty of Deconstructed Architecture

    From Zaha Hadid's majestic MAXII in Italy to the stunning beauty of Frank Gehry's Vitra Design Museum, these structures elevate the environment they were built in Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • Saudi official urges Muslims to delay hajj plans over virus
    Associated Press

    Saudi official urges Muslims to delay hajj plans over virus

    A senior Saudi official urged more than 1 million Muslims intending to perform the hajj to delay making plans this year — comments suggesting the pilgrimage could be cancelled due to the new coronavirus pandemic. In February, the kingdom took the extraordinary decision to close off the holy cities of Mecca and Medina to foreigners over the virus, a step which wasn't taken even during the 1918 flu epidemic that killed tens of millions worldwide. Restrictions have tightened in the kingdom as it grapples with over 1,500 confirmed cases of the new virus.

  • California appears to be flattening the curve. But its testing lags behind other states
    The Guardian

    California appears to be flattening the curve. But its testing lags behind other states

    California has not seen the surge in coronavirus cases that have overwhelmed cities like New York and Detroit in the past week, which suggests that the state's early and restrictive shelter-in-place orders could be slowing the virus's spread. California implemented one of the earliest and strictest orders to stay at home in the United States in mid-March, and as of Wednesday, there were 8,584 confirmed Covid-19 cases and 183 deaths in the state compared with the 76,000 cases and 1,714 deaths in New York. Dr Deborah Birx, the White House's coronavirus taskforce coordinator, said on Tuesday that she was “reassured by what California has been able to do” to help control the virus with physical distancing orders.

  • McConnell Urges Pelosi to Abandon Effort to Use Coronavirus Relief Bill to Achieve Unrelated Policy Goals
    National Review

    McConnell Urges Pelosi to Abandon Effort to Use Coronavirus Relief Bill to Achieve Unrelated Policy Goals

    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell dismissed attempts by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to spearhead talks about a fourth coronavirus relief bill, saying that she should “stand down” on the proposal. “She needs to stand down on the notion that we're going to go along with taking advantage of the crisis to do things that are unrelated to the crisis,” McConnell said, calling the speaker's suggestions about fourth relief bill “premature.” The Senate majority leader's remarks come a week after Congress passed a massive $2 trillion stimulus package to offset the economic destruction caused by the coronavirus pandemic, which continues to spread across the country, causing businesses to shutter and lay off workers.

  • Philippine leader says coronavirus lockdown violators could be shot
    Yahoo News Video

    Philippine leader says coronavirus lockdown violators could be shot

    The president of the Philippines said Wednesday in a televised address that people who violate coronavirus lockdown rules could be shot.

  • China's Shenzhen bans the eating of cats and dogs after coronavirus
    Reuters

    China's Shenzhen bans the eating of cats and dogs after coronavirus

    The Chinese city of Shenzhen has banned the eating of dogs and cats as part of a wider clampdown on the wildlife trade since the emergence of the new coronavirus. Scientists suspect the coronavirus passed to humans from animals. Some of the earliest infections were found in people who had exposure to a wildlife market in the central city of Wuhan, where bats, snakes, civets and other animals were sold.

  • Woodworking Can Bring Solace in Times of Uncertainty
    Popular Mechanics

    Woodworking Can Bring Solace in Times of Uncertainty

    When things get stressful, it's worth slowing down and appreciating the simpler things. From Popular Mechanics

  • Trump news – live: Six-week-old baby dies of coronavirus White House tries to blame slow response on CDC and China
    The Independent

    Trump news – live: Six-week-old baby dies of coronavirus White House tries to blame slow response on CDC and China

    Donald Trump has issued his starkest warning yet on the threat posed by the coronavirus outbreak to the US, telling the country it is facing “a hell of a bad two weeks” and saying observing social distancing rules is “a matter of life and death”. I want every American to be prepared for the hard days that lie ahead,” he said at his latest briefing from the White House. This is going to be one of the roughest two or three weeks we've ever had in our country...