Guilford Coronavirus Update: Free Online Fitness Classes

This article originally appeared on the Guilford Patch

GUILFORD, CT — A Guilford fitness studio is offering free, online fitness classes.

Here's the press release about the free classes:

COVID-19 has disrupted all of our lives, our daily routines and our economic outlook. Many have found it challenging to adjust to the insular existence we are all facing. In response to this, a fitness studio in Guilford, CT has found a unique solution to assist adults of all ages to maintain an exercise routine, for body and mind, by providing Free LIVE on line classes. These classes are through Zoom, an easy to use online conferencing platform. The classes are taught by Simone Gell and Erin Schuster, both highly trained and certified teachers of Barre, Yoga, Osteo Fitness and Stretch.

Since its launch last week, TrueForm Studio LIVE classes have been averaging 40-50 participants. This boutique studio, which has been operating in Guilford for the past 7 years, has a dedicated following ranging in ages 18-80. TrueForm offers appropriate classes for ones fitness level and age. The studio’s owner, Simone Gell, indicated she “wanted shoreline residents who may feel isolated, lethargic and lonely to have the opportunity to join the TrueForm community. Given the uncertainty of the duration of this event and the economic insecurity surrounding it, I decided to go LIVE online free of charge. The studio will reopen as soon as permitted.”

Based on her anecdotal research and feedback from existing students, Simone has found “people are craving exercise and community and having a scheduled time to enjoy free classes together with others is far more effective than costly on demand content with monthly memberships that roll over and go unused.”

The studio is currently offering classes in Barre, Gentle Yoga, Stretch and Foam Roller and Osteo Fitness (a class designed for those with Arthritis/Osteoporosis). “TrueForm’s focus is to empower students by educating them in form and alignment. An aligned body trained in strength, stamina and flexibility translates to a confident individual who feels better and is equipped to handle life’s challenges.” says Gell.

At a time like this, we all need these skills.

For more information on TrueForm Studio and how to participate in these free LIVE classes, go to www.trueformstudio.com

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