What happens if you lose your COVID vaccine record card? CDC offers other options

Katie Camero

Everyone who gets a COVID-19 vaccine will be given what health officials call “second-dose reminder” cards.

Both the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna shots require two injections separated by about a month in order to gain full protection from infection with the coronavirus.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said the card also serves as a record-keeper in case vaccine registries or other systems are not available when people return for their second dose.

But don’t worry, if you lose your vaccination record card you can still get your second dose, a CDC spokesperson told McClatchy News. Because the card is simply a reminder, there are other options in case you misplace it.

What to do if you lose your COVID-19 vaccine record card

Most states have what the CDC calls “immunization information systems” used to help monitor vaccine uptake. This may look like texts, calls or emails that are sent to remind people of when to visit their vaccination site for their pre-scheduled second dose.

The clinic, organization or hospital center where someone received their first shot might also have their own systems in place that provide second dose reminders for patients.

V-safe” is another option, according to the CDC. It’s a smartphone-based tool that sends test messages and utilizes web surveys to offer health check-ins after you get your first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.

If desired, you can set up a reminder on the app after registration to remind you of your next appointment or to remind you to schedule one in the appropriate time frame.

VaxText” is another free text messaging platform that health care providers can offer to their patients where they can opt to get second dose reminders.

Other options include taking a picture of your record card with your phone or writing down your appointment date on an electronic calendar, the CDC said.

As of Jan. 13, more than 10.2 million people in the U.S. have received their first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, according to a CDC tracker.