Harry Reid is the Loser in FERC Fight

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Harry Reid is the Loser in FERC Fight

When Ron Binz announced Tuesday he withdrew his name as President Obama's nominee to chair the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the biggest loser in Washington was not Obama or Binz.

It was Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, who hand-picked Binz, a renewable-energy advocate, over Democratic Commissioner John Norris, who was Obama's initial choice but reportedly "too pro-coal" for Reid.

An aggressive campaign by conservative groups won this battle and Reid lost it.

Obama must now go back to the start, without his initial pick Norris as an option, because no one in town thinks Norris has a shot after blaming Reid for getting passed over.

Reid's office didn't respond to a request for comment. But of course, this is just an ember amid the raging flames of the first government shutdown in 17 years.

Reid has bigger problems now.

Amy Harder
aharder@nationaljournal.com

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