Health Officials Navigate Coronavirus Concerns Among Homeless Population

People experiencing homelessness in Denver could be vulnerable to coronavirus.

  • Birx warns of coming coronavirus hot spots across the U.S.
    Yahoo News

    Birx warns of coming coronavirus hot spots across the U.S.

    Louisiana is poised to become the next epicenter of the coronavirus crisis, White House officials said Thursday, citing new data that shows that 26 percent of the tests for COVID-19 in that state in recent days have come back positive. The New York area remains a “very clear and important hot zone,” Dr. Deborah Birx said at Thursday's briefing of the White House coronavirus task force as she revealed testing statistics on specific states. “What we're seeing finally is testing improving,” said Birx, a renowned veteran of the HIV/AIDS fight who is now serving as the response coordinator for the coronavirus task force.

  • Coronavirus poses special risk to millions of Americans with diabetes
    Yahoo News

    Coronavirus poses special risk to millions of Americans with diabetes

    As the worsening coronavirus pandemic continues to spread across the country, millions of Americans living with diabetes face heightened risks from COVID-19. Around 30 million Americans have diabetes, mostly of the type II (previously called “adult-onset”) variety. A quarter of U.S. adults with diabetes are over 65, an age that has been shown to delineate increased COVID-19 mortality rates.

  • The Trail Leading Back to the Wuhan Labs
    National Review

    The Trail Leading Back to the Wuhan Labs

    It is understandable that many would be wary of the notion that the origin of the coronavirus could be discovered by some documentary filmmaker who used to live in China. Matthew Tye, who creates YouTube videos, contends he has identified the source of the coronavirus — and a great deal of the information that he presents, obtained from public records posted on the Internet, checks out. The Wuhan Institute of Virology in China indeed posted a job opening on November 18, 2019, “asking for scientists to come research the relationship between the coronavirus and bats.”

  • Trump: Won't wear a coronavirus mask because it would interfere with foreign leader meetings
    USA TODAY

    Trump: Won't wear a coronavirus mask because it would interfere with foreign leader meetings

    President Donald Trump said Friday he would choose not to wear a coronavirus mask because it would interfere with his ability to meet with foreign presidents, prime ministers and "dictators." "Somehow sitting in the Oval Office, behind that beautiful Resolute Desk," Trump said, indicating he thought it would be uncomfortable wearing a mask as he met with "presidents, prime ministers, dictators, kings, queens – I don't know, somehow I don't see it for myself." Trump made the remark Friday during a White House news conference in which he announced the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would revise recommendations to advise people to start wearing masks in public to stop the spread of the coronavirus.

  • Chinese government rejects allegations that its face masks were defective, tells countries to 'double check' instructions
    Business Insider

    Chinese government rejects allegations that its face masks were defective, tells countries to 'double check' instructions

    REUTERS/Marko Djurica The Chinese government is rebuffing the notion that its face masks exported to other countries were "defective" and suggested that the nations did not "double-check" the instructions. China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs on Thursday claimed in a tweet that the "true story" behind the alleged faulty face masks imported by the Netherlands was that the Chinese manufacturer explicitly "stated clearly that they are non-surgical." Representatives from the Chinese government in recent weeks shifted the narrative surrounding the coronavirus's origins by questioning its validity.

  • Reuters

    Putin replaces head of remote Russian region after coronavirus outbreak

    Russian President Vladimir Putin replaced the head of a remote northern region on Thursday soon after a preliminary investigation was launched to check if more than 50 people in a local hospital had been infected by a doctor. Russia's Komi republic, 1,000 km (620 miles) northeast of Moscow, has reported 56 cases of the virus, more than any other region outside Moscow, its surrounding region and St. Petersburg. Fifty-five of those cases were related to a single hospital in the district of Ezhva in Komi's regional capital, Syktyvkar, according to a statement by the regional administration.

  • Stacey Abrams trends after Georgia governor said he didn't know about asymptomatic spread
    NBC News

    Stacey Abrams trends after Georgia governor said he didn't know about asymptomatic spread

    Stacey Abrams began trending on U.S. Twitter on Thursday after Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp admitted having only recently learned that asymptomatic individuals can spread the coronavirus — despite warnings from health experts as early as January. "This virus is now transmitting before people see signs," Kemp said. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, based in Atlanta, warned as early as Feb. 12 that the coronavirus could be spread by asymptomatic people.

  • Mexico murder rate reaches new high as violence rages amid Covid-19 spread
    The Guardian

    Mexico murder rate reaches new high as violence rages amid Covid-19 spread

    Photograph: Sergio Maldonado/Reuters Mexico s homicide rate raced to a new record in March, as violence raged even as Covid-19 spread across the country and authorities urged the population to stay home and practise social distancing. Mexico registered 2,585 homicides in March – the highest monthly figure since records began in 1997 – putting 2020 on track to break last year's record total for murders. The surge in killings comes as federal and state officials put resources into containing the Covid-19 crisis and confront the prospect of an already sluggish economy falling even further – potentially deepening the misery for the more than 40% of the population living in poverty.

  • 27 Best Home Office Decor Ideas to Keep You in the Zone
    Architectural Digest

    27 Best Home Office Decor Ideas to Keep You in the Zone

    Work from home and keep your sanity with these decor ideas that will help Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • 6-week-old in Connecticut dies from COVID-19 complications
    Yahoo News Video

    6-week-old in Connecticut dies from COVID-19 complications

    A 6-week-old has died after contracting coronavirus, becoming one of the youngest recorded deaths from COVID-19.

  • Some Coronavirus Patients Show Signs of Brain Ailments
    The New York Times

    Some Coronavirus Patients Show Signs of Brain Ailments

    Neurologists around the world say that a small subset of patients with COVID-19 are developing serious impairments of the brain. Although fever, cough and difficulty breathing are the typical hallmarks of infection with the new coronavirus, some patients exhibit altered mental status, or encephalopathy, a catchall term for brain disease or dysfunction that can have many underlying causes, as well as other serious conditions. The patient, who had chronic lung disease and Parkinson's, was flailing his arms and legs in jerky movements, and appeared to be having a seizure.

  • Associated Press

    US trade gap falls to $39.9 in February, lowest since 2016

    The U.S. trade deficit tumbled in February to the lowest level since 2016 as exports fell and imports fell more. The Commerce Department said Thursday that the gap between what the U.S. buys and what it sells abroad dropped 12.2% to $39.9 billion in February, the lowest since September 2016. President Donald Trump campaigned on a pledge to reduce America's massive trade imbalances, especially with China.

  • Coronavirus: In reversal, Pelosi suggests infrastructure may have to wait in favor of small business relief
    The Independent

    Coronavirus: In reversal, Pelosi suggests infrastructure may have to wait in favor of small business relief

    Speaker Nancy Pelosi suggested on Friday that a sweeping modernization of US infrastructure to help mitigate the coronavirus damage could take a back seat — again — to the needs of struggling small businesses and the overstretched health care system in the next legislative relief package. Ms Pelosi, other Democratic leaders, and even Donald Trump have been angling in recent days to include measures in the next coronavirus response bill that would pump hundreds of billions of dollars — or, in the president's case, trillions — into programs to expand broadband internet access, clean up US water systems, and revamp highways. "While I'm very much in favor of doing some of the things that we need to do to meet the needs — clean water, more broadband and the rest of that — that may have to be for a bill beyond this right now," Ms Pelosi said in an interview with CNBC on Friday.

  • China declared whistleblower doctor Li Wenliang a 'martyr' following a local campaign to silence him for speaking out about the coronavirus
    Business Insider

    China declared whistleblower doctor Li Wenliang a 'martyr' following a local campaign to silence him for speaking out about the coronavirus

    An investigation by the Chinese Communist Party found on March 19 that the actions of law enforcement in Wuhan was "irregular" and "improper." "Martyr" is the highest honor the Communist Party of China can bestow on a citizen killed working to serve the country. The country will honor him with three minutes of silence on Saturday.

  • Portugal tightens Easter travel restrictions due to coronavirus
    Reuters

    Portugal tightens Easter travel restrictions due to coronavirus

    Portugal's government tightened restrictions on movement to stop the spread of the coronavirus during the normally busy Easter holiday period, closing all airports to commercial flights and banning domestic travel from April 9-13. "The virus doesn't travel by itself," Portuguese Prime Minister Antonio Costa told reporters. Between April 9 and 13, a popular period for Portuguese abroad to travel to visit their families, airports will be shut to commercial flights, and only flights repatriating citizens or transporting goods will be allowed to operate.

  • FISA court orders FBI to review if wiretaps are invalid after errors found during investigation
    USA TODAY

    FISA court orders FBI to review if wiretaps are invalid after errors found during investigation

    The secretive court that approves sensitive government surveillance requests said Friday that a lack of confidence in the accuracy of FBI surveillance requests "appears well founded," and ordered the bureau to show whether errors in documents supporting 29 wiretap requests may have rendered the surveillance invalid. The directive from Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court Judge James Boasberg comes just days after an internal Justice Department review found new problems with the FBI's management of wiretap applications, concluding that the documents supporting the requests routinely contained errors or "inadequately supported facts." A DOJ inspector general's analysis of 29 surveillance requests from eight FBI field offices during the past five years concluded that "we do not have confidence" that the bureau followed standards to ensure their accuracy.

  • New Yorkers Are Right to Be Skeptical of Evangelical-Run Coronavirus Ward in Central Park
    The Daily Beast

    New Yorkers Are Right to Be Skeptical of Evangelical-Run Coronavirus Ward in Central Park

    If New York City wasn't under a strict stay-at-home order right now, protesters might be marching along Central Park. The 60-bed emergency field hospital is composed largely of tarp-wrapped tents and will function as a respiratory unit servicing overflow patients from Mount Sinai Hospital. City Mayor Bill de Blasio admitted he was “very concerned” about the operation and was sending people from his office to monitor Samaritan's Purse.

  • Asia virus latest: China mourns dead, S. Korea extends social distancing
    AFP

    Asia virus latest: China mourns dead, S. Korea extends social distancing

    Here are the latest developments in Asia related to the coronavirus pandemic: - China mourns virus victims - China came to a standstill to mourn the patients and medical staff who died because of the coronavirus outbreak, with the country observing a nationwide three-minute silence. At 10 am Saturday, Citizens paused as cars, trains and ships sounded their horns, and air-raid sirens rang out in memory of the more than 3,000 lives lost to the virus in mainland China. In Beijing's Tiananmen Square, the national flag flew at half-mast, and state media showed President Xi Jinping and other officials standing outside a government compound wearing white flowers.

  • Israel locks down ultra-Orthodox city hit hard by coronavirus
    NBC News

    Israel locks down ultra-Orthodox city hit hard by coronavirus

    Israeli police on Friday have surrounded and established roadblocks around an ultra-Orthodox Jewish city that has become a coronavirus hotspot. Police officers established roadblocks to restrict the movement in and out of Bnei Brak, where a small number of the ultra-Orthodox residents' apparent failure to comply with government social distancing requirements has prompted a dangerously high rate of contagion. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu warned Friday that if the ministry of health deemed it necessary the same restrictions could be placed on other locations within Israel.

  • A small trial finds that hydroxychloroquine is not effective for treating coronavirus
    The Conversation

    A small trial finds that hydroxychloroquine is not effective for treating coronavirus

    On Saturday the Food and Drug Administration approved the use of two antimalarial drugs, hydroxychloroquine and a related medication, chloroquine, for emergency use to treat COVID-19. The drugs were touted by President Trump as a “game changer” for COVID-19. The study comes on the heels of two others - one in France and one in China - that reported some benefits in the combination of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin for COVID-19 patients who didn't have severe symptoms of the virus.

  • Biden to name VP vetting team, thinking about Cabinet makeup
    Associated Press

    Biden to name VP vetting team, thinking about Cabinet makeup

    Joe Biden said Friday that he will announce a committee to oversee his vice presidential selection process and is already thinking about whom he'd choose to join his Cabinet. Biden, who holds a significant lead in delegates over Sen. Bernie Sanders in the Democratic presidential primary race but has yet to officially clinch the nomination, also said he's spoken to Sanders to let him know he'd be proceeding with the vice presidential vetting process. Biden, a former vice president himself, has previously committed to choosing a woman as his running mate.

  • Here's How the Army Will Pay New Recruits Who Can’t Get to Basic Training
    Military.com

    Here's How the Army Will Pay New Recruits Who Can’t Get to Basic Training

    The 1,400 recruits on hold because of the novel coronavirus pandemic may be eligible to be paid as privates under the new Future Soldier to Active Duty Program, U.S. Army Recruiting Command announced Thursday. "The majority of the delays are in areas experiencing the largest COVID-19 outbreaks: the New York City metropolitan area, the northeast United States, southern California, south Florida and Seattle," Lisa Ferguson, a spokeswoman for Recruiting Command, told Military.com. The program will pay future soldiers about $1,600 -- the base pay of an active-duty private -- as long as they have had their basic training dates rescheduled based on the virus risk level in their area, according to an April 2 news release posted on the command's website.

  • 'Not acceptable': Navy claims it fired the captain dealing with coronavirus outbreak for sending 'blast out' email to at least 20 people with 'unclassified' system
    Business Insider

    'Not acceptable': Navy claims it fired the captain dealing with coronavirus outbreak for sending 'blast out' email to at least 20 people with 'unclassified' system

    US Navy The Secretary of the Navy offered more details into his decision in relieving the commander of a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier dealing with a coronavirus outbreak. Capt. Brett Crozier of the USS Theodore Roosevelt penned a letter to his superiors about the urgent situation aboard his ship, which was dealing with the spread of the coronavirus. "The letter was sent over non-secure, unclassified email even though that ship possesses some of the most sophisticated communications and encryption equipment in the fleet," the Navy Secretary said.

  • 10 Great Deals on Apparel From REI’s 25% off Sale
    Popular Mechanics

    10 Great Deals on Apparel From REI’s 25% off Sale

    Act fast to score discounts on Patagonia, Nike, Smartwool, and more. From Popular Mechanics

  • Airline refutes Mexican authority's account of spring break coronavirus outbreak
    Reuters

    Airline refutes Mexican authority's account of spring break coronavirus outbreak

    College students from Texas who tested positive for the novel coronavirus after spring break in Los Cabos traveled to the Mexican beach resort on Viva Aerobus, the airline said, and were there a week later than reported by the local tourist board. At least part of the Texas group stayed at the luxury Pueblo Bonito Los Cabos hotel, two people familiar with the arrangements told Reuters. So far 49 students among the group from University of Texas at Austin have tested positive for the coronavirus upon their return to the United States, according to the university.