Here's what to be aware of when shopping for a used car

You may like what you see when it's on the lot, but there's a lot more that a mechanic can tell you when it's up on the lift.

  • Americans stranded at Pakistan airport after cruise ship was denied entry to multiple countries over coronavirus fears
    Yahoo News

    Americans stranded at Pakistan airport after cruise ship was denied entry to multiple countries over coronavirus fears

    A plane full of Americans and Canadians was stranded on a tarmac at an airport in Karachi, Pakistan, for several hours on Thursday after it was turned away from multiple countries due to fears of the coronavirus, according to a family member of two of the passengers. Kelly Chrjapin, whose parents were among those on the flight, said the plane contained more than 250 people, all of whom were American and Canadian nationals who had been traveling on the cruise ship MS Westerdam. One passenger from that boat tested positive for the coronavirus earlier this month.

  • Police: Couple forced boys off road, angered by Trump flags
    Associated Press

    Police: Couple forced boys off road, angered by Trump flags

    A northwestern Indiana couple allegedly used a car to force two teenage boys off a road, angered that the twin brothers were riding bicycles adorned with flags supporting President Donald Trump, before ripping one of the sibling's flag from his bike, police said Friday. Hobart police said Snapchat videos helped officers secure charges against Kyren Gregory Perry-Jones, 23, and Cailyn Marie Smith, 18, in connection with a July 22 incident. Police Capt. James Gonzales said the Hobart couple are accused of driving in their car, running the 14-year-old boys off of the road, and making threats toward them.

  • AOC launches plan to block non-progressive Democrats with all-female candidates: 'My ambition right now is to be a little less lonely in Congress'
    The Independent

    AOC launches plan to block non-progressive Democrats with all-female candidates: 'My ambition right now is to be a little less lonely in Congress'

    Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is planning to endorse an all-female group of progressive candidates to build the far left, with some of the challengers going against members already in the Democratic Party. Her endorsements of more than one dozen candidates from her new political action committee will include a progressive challenger to potentially unseat a Texas representative from her party. "I think my ambition right now is to be a little less lonely in Congress," she told the New York Times.

  • Quadruple murderer executed in Tennessee
    AFP

    Quadruple murderer executed in Tennessee

    A quadruple murderer was put to death in Tennessee on Thursday despite lawyers asking the US Supreme Court for a stay of execution. Nicholas Sutton, 58, was found guilty of stabbing a fellow inmate to death in 1985. Sutton's lawyers in January asked the state's Republican governor, Bill Lee, to grant clemency, citing expressions of support for Sutton from prison officials.

  • Democrat Warren, worried campaign will run out of cash, taps $3 million loan
    Reuters

    Democrat Warren, worried campaign will run out of cash, taps $3 million loan

    NEW YORK/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren raised more money than most of her Democratic presidential rivals in the weeks before the Iowa caucuses, but spent so heavily that her campaign took out a $3 million loan fearing she would run out of cash. Warren raised $10.4 million in contributions in January -- more than former Vice President Joe Biden's $9 million and former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg's $6 million -- but ended the month with only $2.3 million in cash, according to disclosures filed on Thursday. All of the presidential hopefuls were required to submit financial disclosures on Thursday, public documents that offer insights into how they are managing their multi-million campaign operations.

  • CDC is preparing for the 'likely' spread of coronavirus in the US, officials say
    USA TODAY

    CDC is preparing for the 'likely' spread of coronavirus in the US, officials say

    Health experts sounded the alarm Friday over the worldwide threat of the coronavirus, with officials warning of its "likely" community spread in the United States and the World Health Organization cautioning that "the window of opportunity is narrowing" for containing the outbreak worldwide. The COVID-19 coronavirus, which erupted in China in December, has killed at least 2,360 people and sickened at least 77,900 worldwide, the majority of cases in mainland China. Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, told reporters Friday that U.S. health officials are preparing for the coronavirus to become a pandemic.

  • South Korea accepted that its efforts to stop the coronavirus from infecting the country failed and says it's pivoting to containment
    Business Insider

    South Korea accepted that its efforts to stop the coronavirus from infecting the country failed and says it's pivoting to containment

    Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images With coronavirus cases soaring, the government in South Korea said on Friday that it had failed to keep the virus out of the country and must now focus on containment. South Korea is now the country with the most coronavirus infections outside China, with a total of 433 confirmed cases. The government has urged the 2.5 million people in Daegu to stay in their homes and has banned some public gatherings.

  • Twitter Has Reportedly Suspended 70 Pro-Bloomberg Accounts for Violating Its Platform Manipulation Policy
    Time

    Twitter Has Reportedly Suspended 70 Pro-Bloomberg Accounts for Violating Its Platform Manipulation Policy

    On Friday, Twitter began suspending 70 pro-Bloomberg accounts for violating a company policy put in place in response to the 2016 election, according to the Los Angeles Times. In a statement to TIME, Twitter confirmed that it has “taken enforcement action on a group of accounts for violating our rules against platform manipulation and spam.” Some accounts will be permanently suspended and others will have to go through steps to verify their owners. The suspended accounts, first reported on by the Times, usually used identical language and images in each tweet and many only began a few months.

  • A 15-month-old last seen in December was reported missing only this week
    NBC News

    A 15-month-old last seen in December was reported missing only this week

    A Tennessee sheriff said Friday he believes a 15-month-old girl — last seen in December but only reported missing this week — is still alive. Law enforcement agencies across the state were on the lookout for the toddler and a gray 2007 BMW, with Tennessee stickers, because "individuals traveling" in that vehicle "have information regarding Evelyn Boswell's whereabouts," the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation said. The little girl's name was added to the state's database of missing children on Tuesday with a notation: "Evelyn was entered as a missing child on Tuesday February 18, 2020 but was reportedly last seen on December 26, 2019."

  • A New York lawmaker wants to treat white supremacists like foreign jihadists. Is this the solution, or a new war on terror?
    Yahoo News

    A New York lawmaker wants to treat white supremacists like foreign jihadists. Is this the solution, or a new war on terror?

    If all else were to fail in his fight against the threat of domestic terrorism, Rep. Max Rose offered an unconventional plan to protect the Brooklynites who had come to hear him speak at a Jewish community center: He'd stand on guard duty at their places of worship himself. “I'll do it,” Rose told the people who came out to this low-slung stretch of Ocean Parkway, where mosques and synagogues sit next to auto repair shops and fast food joints. The first Jewish lawmaker to represent Staten Island — and the first Democrat elected by the Republican redoubt in a decade — Rose has recently emerged as a leading proponent of treating white supremacists no differently than law enforcement treats foreign terrorists.

  • Iowa Professor Bound and Gagged Husband Before His Death: Cops
    The Daily Beast

    Iowa Professor Bound and Gagged Husband Before His Death: Cops

    An Iowa professor has been charged for allegedly gagging and binding her husband to a chair with rope for hours before his death, authorities said on Wednesday evening. Gowun Park, a 41-year-old assistant economics professor at Simpson College, was charged with first-degree murder and first-degree kidnapping in the death of her 41-year-old husband, Sung Nam, on Saturday, West Des Moines police told The Daily Beast. Authorities allege Park bound her husband's hands and feet with zip ties before tying him to a chair in their West Des Moines home on Saturday between 10:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Park then allegedly stuffed “an item of clothing” into Nam's mouth to prevent him from yelling in protest before finally using duct tape to place a towel over his head to cover his eyes.

  • Housing crisis: Berkeley law would put renters first
    Associated Press

    Housing crisis: Berkeley law would put renters first

    The mayor of Berkeley, California, proposed a new housing policy Thursday aimed at giving renters first dibs when a property goes up for sale, as the state battles a severe housing shortage and homelessness that Gov. Gavin Newsom has declared his top priority. Berkeley Mayor Jesse Arreguin announced a proposed ordinance to give renters "the first refusal and right to purchase" when their apartment buildings or rented homes are put on the market. Berkeley's city council will vote on the idea later this month.

  • The biggest obstacle standing between Bernie Sanders and the White House
    The Independent

    The biggest obstacle standing between Bernie Sanders and the White House

    Buoyed by popular-vote wins in Iowa and New Hampshire and small donations from millions of supporters, Bernie Sanders enters the Nevada caucus with the lead in 10 national polls, with forecasters predicting his victory with as much as 32 per cent of the vote. Donald Trump and Mike Bloomberg have raised red-scare flags. Pete Buttigieg warns that the senator's ambitious plan would explode the growing deficit.

  • A recurring Biden campaign story about being arrested in South Africa is full of inconsistencies
    The Week

    A recurring Biden campaign story about being arrested in South Africa is full of inconsistencies

    Former Vice President Joe Biden has a pretty good tale to share — but it may be a little tall. Biden, who is running for president, has been spicing up his recent campaign stump speeches with a story of how he was arrested while in South Africa trying to see Nelson Mandela, The New York Times reports. During recent campaign speeches, Biden says he "had the great honor" of meeting Mandela and "of being arrested with our U.N. ambassador on the streets of Soweto." As Miami Herald reporter Alex Daugherty points out, Soweto is a ways away from Robben Island, where Mandela's maximum security prison was located.

  • Warren Reverses Pledge to Refuse PAC Money, Implies She’s Been Held to Sexist Double Standard
    National Review

    Warren Reverses Pledge to Refuse PAC Money, Implies She’s Been Held to Sexist Double Standard

    Senator Elizabeth Warren (D., Mass.) changed her tune on the nefarious influence of super PACs just days after receiving the backing of a newly formed PAC, telling reporters on Thursday that because “all of the men” in the race refused to rely entirely on individual donors, she shouldn't be expected to either. Warren, speaking to reporters in Nevada, tried to square her past disavowals of super PAC funding with her refusal to disavow a new PAC that made a $1 million television ad buy on her behalf this week. “The first day I got in this race, over a year ago, I said 'I hope every presidential candidate who comes in will agree — no Super PACs for any of us,” Warren explained.

  • More than 100 wild animals in China died from poisoning in a mass die-off seemingly triggered by coronavirus disinfectant
    Business Insider

    More than 100 wild animals in China died from poisoning in a mass die-off seemingly triggered by coronavirus disinfectant

    STR/AFP via Getty Images More than 100 wild animals were found dead in a Chinese megacity and tests show that they were poisoned by the disinfectant that's being used to combat the coronavirus. At least 17 species of animals, including wild boar, weasels, and blackbirds, were affected by the mass die-off. Nanchong Stray Animal Rescue claims that authorities are killing domesticated animals outright amid fears that they can spread the coronavirus.

  • Twitter Suspends 70 Accounts With Pro-Mike Bloomberg Tweets
    Bloomberg

    Twitter Suspends 70 Accounts With Pro-Mike Bloomberg Tweets

    Some of the suspensions will be permanent, while in some cases account owners will have to verify they have control of their accounts, the Twitter statement said. The campaign has reportedly hired hundreds of employees to pump out campaign messages on social media platforms. In accounts reviewed by the Los Angeles Times, which first reported the enforcement action, the organizers used identical texts, links and hashtags.

  • Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s progressive PAC makes first round of endorsements
    Yahoo News Video

    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s progressive PAC makes first round of endorsements

    Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez announced Friday her political action committee's first round of endorsements, which will include two progressive candidates challenging sitting Democratic members of Congress.

  • In Case on Wealth Test for Green Cards, a Scathing Sotomayor Dissent
    The New York Times

    In Case on Wealth Test for Green Cards, a Scathing Sotomayor Dissent

    The Supreme Court on Friday allowed the Trump administration to move forward with plans to deny green cards to immigrants who are thought to be likely to become “public charges” by making even occasional and minor use of public benefits like Medicaid, food stamps and housing vouchers. As in a similar case last month, the vote was 5 to 4, with the court's conservative justices in the majority. As before, the court's brief order included no reasons for lifting a preliminary injunction that had blocked the new program.

  • Reuters

    U.S. charges ex-DEA agent with laundering millions in drug funds

    U.S. authorities arrested a former Drug Enforcement Administration agent on Friday on charges he conspired with Colombian drug traffickers to steal millions of dollars the U.S. government had seized from suspected dealers. In an indictment unsealed Friday, prosecutors said Jose Irizarry had been "enriching himself by secretly using his position and his special access to information." He used the money, they said, to fund a lavish lifestyle of expensive homes and cars and a $30,000 Tiffany ring. Federal prosecutors said Irizarry used his position with the drug agency to launder money with the help of what they described as a "Colombia-based drug trafficking and money laundering organization" that he was ostensibly investigating.

  • First US patient has fully recovered from coronavirus in Washington state; nearly 800 still under watch
    USA TODAY

    First US patient has fully recovered from coronavirus in Washington state; nearly 800 still under watch

    A Washington state man who was the nation's first confirmed case of the new coronavirus has made a full recovery and is no longer quarantined, health officials announced. Almost 800 people remain on the state's watch list as health officials around the world battle to contain the virus, COVID-19, which has infected more than 76,000 people worldwide and caused 2,247 deaths, mostly in mainland China. In the USA, 15 cases have been confirmed, and one American has died in China.

  • US accuses Russia of huge coronavirus disinformation campaign
    The Independent

    US accuses Russia of huge coronavirus disinformation campaign

    US officials say thousands of social media accounts linked to Russia are part of a coordinated effort to spread disinformation about the new coronavirus. The campaign allegedly aims to damage the US's image and spread unfounded conspiracy theories that it is behind the outbreak which has infected nearly 78,000 globally and killed over 2,500 people. US State Department officials told AFP fake accounts were created and used on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram so the campaign could reach as many people as possible in multiple languages.

  • New Trump intelligence pick fits pattern of mistrust
    Yahoo News Video

    New Trump intelligence pick fits pattern of mistrust

    Intelligence experts interviewed by Yahoo News are skeptical that Richard Grenell, President Trump's pick to replace Adm. Joseph Maguire as acting director of national intelligence, is a good fit for the job.

  • Associated Press

    Judge dismisses Nunes lawsuit against Fusion GPS

    A federal judge on Friday dismissed a racketeering lawsuit brought by Republican Rep. Devin Nunes against the political research firm that enlisted a former British spy to look into Donald Trump's ties to Russia during the 2016 presidential campaign. Nunes, the former chairman of the House Intelligence Committee and a vocal ally of Trump, had accused Fusion GPS in a lawsuit last year of harassing him and trying to impede his panel's investigation into Russian election interference. The lawsuit, which was filed in federal court in Alexandria, Virginia, and also named a nonprofit advocacy group as a defendant, sought nearly $10 million in damages.

  • Airport worker with no license takes plane for spin near D.C., almost crashes, feds say
    NBC News

    Airport worker with no license takes plane for spin near D.C., almost crashes, feds say

    A Virginia man piloted at least one plane without a license in 2018, in a dangerous journey that ended with a "bounced" landing, federal authorities said. Ryan Guy Parker "knowingly and willfully" flew above suburban Washington D.C., posing a "significant risk of injury and death" to himself and the public, according to an affidavit by U.S. Department of Transportation Special Agent Bret Stolle. In a Sept. 27, 2018 trip out of Shannon Airport in Fredericksburg, Parker nearly crashed on touch down, Stolle wrote.