Highland Park 4th of July parade shooting survivors speak out

·2 min read

As Abby Brosio stood with her father-in-law watching the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois, on Monday morning, a hail of bullets began to fly from top of the building directly across the street.

"I remember looking around to try to figure out where the sound was coming from," Brosio told "Good Morning America" on Tuesday morning. "And I, in fact, looked up at the neighboring business across the street and saw the shooter on the roof and I just screamed that it was a shooter."

She said she saw "long hair and a gun." As she turned to pull her 1-year-old daughter and 3-year-old son into Gearhead Outfitters, a store managed by her husband, Tony, she was grazed by a bullet, she said.

PHOTO: An American flag blanket is seen abandoned along the parade route after a mass shooting at a Fourth of July parade in the Chicago suburb of Highland Park, Illinois, on July 4, 2022. (Cheney Orr/Reuters)
PHOTO: An American flag blanket is seen abandoned along the parade route after a mass shooting at a Fourth of July parade in the Chicago suburb of Highland Park, Illinois, on July 4, 2022. (Cheney Orr/Reuters)

Her father-in-law was shot in the leg, she said.

Six people were killed and more than 24 others were injured in Monday's mass shooting in Highland Park, a suburb north of Chicago, according to officials. Police said on Monday they took into custody a 22-year-old person of interest, Robert "Bobby" Crimo III, in connection with the incident.

PHOTO: Tony Brosio and  Abby Brosio appear on 'Good Morning America,' July 5, 2022. (ABC News)
PHOTO: Tony Brosio and Abby Brosio appear on 'Good Morning America,' July 5, 2022. (ABC News)

Tony Brosio was inside Gearhead Outfitters as the shooting began. As parade spectators rushed the store, looking to take cover, he helped coordinate. Video from inside the store shows crowds running inside. Some stumble, others glance behind them.

MORE: What we know about the victims of the July 4th Highland Park parade shooting

"We were just trying to get as many people as we possibly could inside," he told "GMA" on Tuesday. "Like I said, it was just instinct."

Both the Brosios had the feeling that it "could never happen" to them that they'd be in an active shooting situation, he said.

PHOTO: Belongings are shown left behind at the scene of a mass shooting along the route of a Fourth of July parade on July 4, 2022, in Highland Park, Illinois.  (Mark Borenstein/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Belongings are shown left behind at the scene of a mass shooting along the route of a Fourth of July parade on July 4, 2022, in Highland Park, Illinois. (Mark Borenstein/Getty Images)

"You alway have that, 'It could never happen here,'" he said. "It just did."

"It was like a dream. All I could say to myself was, 'This isn't real,'" Abby said.

As Abby and her father-in-law reached the safety of Gearhead Outfitters, she realized that they'd both been hit by bullets, she said. Both were taken to a local hospital and later released, she said.

Highland Park 4th of July parade shooting survivors speak out originally appeared on abcnews.go.com