Highway crash in Georgia kills six

A driver reportedly going in the wrong direction on I-95 slammed head-on into an SUV, killing a couple and their three children.

  • After more than 10,000 coronavirus deaths — the worst in the world — Italy is showing signs that its 3-week lockdown is working
    Business Insider

    After more than 10,000 coronavirus deaths — the worst in the world — Italy is showing signs that its 3-week lockdown is working

    Remo Casilli/Reuters Italy is showing very early signs that it's turning a corner with the coronavirus outbreak as the numbers of new reported deaths and cases have slowed, according to multiple reports. The country's strict three-week lockdown is due to be lifted on Friday, but officials have said it's likely to be extended. It's a sign that those under lockdown "save lives" by staying home, Luca Richeldi, a government health adviser, said on Sunday.

  • Rep. Velazquez has presumed COVID-19 infection, was near Pelosi, other lawmakers last week
    NBC News

    Rep. Velazquez has presumed COVID-19 infection, was near Pelosi, other lawmakers last week

    Rep. Nydia Velazquez said Monday that she's been "diagnosed with presumed coronavirus infection," three days after she spoke on the House floor and stood near 80-year-old House Speaker Nancy Pelosi during the signing of the $2.2 trillion coronavirus stimulus bill. In a statement, Velazquez, D-N.Y., 67, said she first started feeling sick "in the wee hours of Sunday morning." At the advice of The Attending Physician, neither COVID 19 laboratory testing nor a doctor's office visit was recommended.

  • U.S. spies find coronavirus spread in China, North Korea, Russia hard to chart
    Reuters

    U.S. spies find coronavirus spread in China, North Korea, Russia hard to chart

    As U.S. spy agencies seek to assemble a precise picture of the world's coronavirus outbreaks, they are finding serious gaps in their ability to assess the situation in China, Russia and North Korea, according to five U.S. government sources familiar with the intelligence reporting. The agencies also have limited insight into the full impact of the pandemic in Iran, although information on infections and deaths among the ruling class and public is becoming more available on official and social media, two sources said.

  • Mnuchin: Virus task force unanimously shunned Trump's quarantine idea
    Politico

    Mnuchin: Virus task force unanimously shunned Trump's quarantine idea

    The White House coronavirus task force unanimously shunned President Donald Trump's suggestion of a quarantine in the New York City area, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Sunday. The president “did very seriously consider” the idea of locking down the tri-state area of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut, Mnuchin said on “Fox News Sunday. But Trump was dissuaded after a meeting with the task force led by Vice President Mike Pence.

  • Wuhan Residents Dismiss Official Coronavirus Death Toll: ‘The Incinerators Have Been Working Around the Clock’
    National Review

    Wuhan Residents Dismiss Official Coronavirus Death Toll: ‘The Incinerators Have Been Working Around the Clock’

    Wuhan residents are increasingly skeptical of the Chinese Communist Party's reported coronavirus death count of approximately 2,500 deaths in the city to date, with most people believing the actual number is at least 40,000. “Maybe the authorities are gradually releasing the real figures, intentionally or unintentionally, so that people will gradually come to accept the reality,” a Wuhan resident, who gave only his surname Mao, told Radio Free Asia. A city source added that, based on the aggregation of funeral and cremation numbers, authorities likely know the real number and are keeping it under wraps.

  • Fit, healthy 33-year-old recounts falling ill to coronavirus
    Associated Press

    Fit, healthy 33-year-old recounts falling ill to coronavirus

    Still, Napoli, a lawyer in Rome, developed a cough and fever less than a week after Italy's premier locked down the entire nation, including the capital which had continued life as usual while the virus raged in the north. Until that day, Napoli was following his routine of work, jogging and swimming. He received a positive diagnosis for COVID-19 three days later.

  • If you're 'essential' enough to work through a coronavirus pandemic, you're essential enough to be paid living wage
    Los Angeles Times Opinion

    If you're 'essential' enough to work through a coronavirus pandemic, you're essential enough to be paid living wage

    Grocery stores are one of the only places where people are still allowed to congregate. If you're going to be exposed to the coronavirus, it will most likely be there. Aware of this danger, my 15 minutes inside the store were stressful, to say the least.

  • New Zealand, a country of about 5 million, has 18 million masks in its reserves, with 80,000 more being made every day
    INSIDER

    New Zealand, a country of about 5 million, has 18 million masks in its reserves, with 80,000 more being made every day

    In a post on Instagram on Friday, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said the country had 18 million masks in reserve, with 80,000 more being made a day. It's not clear how many of these are surgical masks compared to N95 respirators. The US, which has just under 330 million people, has a national stockpile has about 12 million N95 masks and 30 million surgical masks.

  • Coronavirus: Why are planes still flying?
    BBC

    Coronavirus: Why are planes still flying?

    Surprisingly, a number of global airlines are still running passenger flights, including British Airways (BA). Passenger flights are believed to have been cut by up to 95%, but that still means one in 20 are taking off. "We are working with European Union (EU) governments to try to keep some minimum flight links open for emergency reasons, even though the passenger loads on these flights will be very low," said Ryanair.

  • 29 Best Closet Organization Ideas to Maximize Space and Style
    Architectural Digest

    29 Best Closet Organization Ideas to Maximize Space and Style

    How to organize your closet like a pro Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • 'I don't know what he's trying to say': Cuomo on Trump's accusation that medical PPE is being stolen by health workers
    Yahoo News Video

    'I don't know what he's trying to say': Cuomo on Trump's accusation that medical PPE is being stolen by health workers

    At a coronavirus press briefing, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said he didn't know what President Trump was talking about with regard to his accusation that medical personnel were stealing personal protective equipment.

  • U.S. renews sanctions waivers allowing Iran nonproliferation work
    Reuters

    U.S. renews sanctions waivers allowing Iran nonproliferation work

    The United States has allowed Russian, Chinese and European companies to continue their work at Iranian nuclear sites to make it harder for Tehran to develop nuclear weapons, the U.S. State Department said on Monday. Reuters earlier reported that the decision to renew waivers to sanctions that bar non-U.S. firms from dealing with Iran's Atomic Energy Organization was expected on Monday, citing four sources familiar with the matter including a U.S. official. Jewish News Syndicate, a news outlet predominantly focused on Israel and the Jewish world, first reported that the United States was expected to renew the waivers, citing two sources familiar with the decision.

  • Mexico's president defends his handshake with 'El Chapo' Guzman's mother — a 'respectable old lady'
    Business Insider

    Mexico's president defends his handshake with 'El Chapo' Guzman's mother — a 'respectable old lady'

    Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador on Monday defended his weekend handshake with the mother of drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, calling her a "respectable old lady" and seeking to cast his critics as the principal menace to the country. In a 30-second video posted on Twitter on Sunday, Lopez Obrador could be seen approaching Maria Consuelo Loera's car, parked on a dirt road on the outskirts of Badiraguato, a mountainous municipality in the northwestern state of Sinaloa. Surrounded by onlookers, Lopez Obrador told Loera she need not get out of the car, they shook hands and after a brief exchange he told her he had "received her letter."

  • Bloomberg

    China Clashes at Virus Epicenter Show Risks Facing Xi Jinping

    China's leaders normally spend a lot of time and money on keeping the country's 1.4 billion people in line -- and that was before a global pandemic ravaging the world economy threatened to put millions out of work. A rare street clash over the weekend on the border of virus-stricken Hubei province shows the challenges President Xi Jinping faces as China looks to get its economy moving again after appearing to gets its Covid-19 outbreak under control. Hubei is only now emerging from a two-month lockdown that helped limit the virus's spread to other parts of China.

  • China's Huawei warns more US pressure may spur retaliation
    Associated Press

    China's Huawei warns more US pressure may spur retaliation

    Huawei's chairman warned Tuesday that more U.S. moves to increase pressure on the Chinese tech giant might trigger retaliation by Beijing that could damage its worldwide industry. Huawei Technologies Ltd., which makes smartphones and network equipment, reported that its 2019 sales rose by double digits despite curbs imposed in May on its access to U.S. components and technology. Huawei is at the center of tensions with Washington over technology and possible spying that helped to spark Trump's tariff war with China in 2018.

  • Dr. Birx predicts up to 200,000 coronavirus deaths 'if we do things almost perfectly'
    NBC News

    Dr. Birx predicts up to 200,000 coronavirus deaths 'if we do things almost perfectly'

    The White House coronavirus response coordinator said Monday that she is "very worried about every city in the United States" and projects 100,000 to 200,000 American deaths as a best case scenario. In an interview on "TODAY," Dr. Deborah Birx painted a grim message about the expected fatalities, echoing that they could hit more than 2 million without any measures, as coronavirus cases continue to climb throughout the country. "I think everyone understands now that you can go from five to 50 to 500 to 5,000 cases very quickly," Birx said.

  • Open coffins are left on roads to remind people to stay inside while soldiers shoot disinfectant from water cannons. Here's what lockdown for 57 million people in the Philippines looks like.
    INSIDER

    Open coffins are left on roads to remind people to stay inside while soldiers shoot disinfectant from water cannons. Here's what lockdown for 57 million people in the Philippines looks like.

    Ezra Acayan/Getty The Philippines' main island Luzon, which has a population of more than 57 million, is on lockdown. Along with people's movements being restricted, soldiers are covering residents and the streets in disinfectant, and open coffins have been left on the roads as a warning to people to stay inside. On Sunday, the Philippines reported 343 new coronavirus cases in a day — its highest one day increase yet.

  • U.S. is swiftly deporting migrant children at the border
    CBS News

    U.S. is swiftly deporting migrant children at the border

    Citing a public health order to curb the coronavirus pandemic, the Trump administration is swiftly deporting unaccompanied migrant minors apprehended near the U.S.-Mexico border, upending a long-standing practice required under a federal law designed to protect children from violence and exploitation. Despite initially maintaining that the new measures would not apply to unaccompanied minors, Customs and Border Protection on Monday said its officials could deny entry to children who cross the southern border alone under an order by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC. The agency said some minors could be excluded from the CDC directive if a border official "suspects trafficking or sees signs of illness."

  • Coronavirus lockdowns are working, according to data from digital thermometer app
    The Week

    Coronavirus lockdowns are working, according to data from digital thermometer app

    Three-quarters of Americans have been urged or ordered to stay at home, to the extent possible, to stop the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus, and those measures appear to be working, The New York Times reports, citing data from internet-connected thermometer company Kinsa. The thermometers and their app upload temperature readings to a centralized database, allowing Kinsa to track fevers across the country. It started mapping fevers to catch flu outbreaks in 2018, and it modified its software to look for "atypical" COVID-19 fevers earlier in March.

  • Tablighi Jamaat: Delhi Nizamuddin event sparks massive search for Covid-19 cases
    BBC

    Tablighi Jamaat: Delhi Nizamuddin event sparks massive search for Covid-19 cases

    Officials across India are searching for hundreds of people who attended a religious event in the capital that has set off several Covid-19 clusters. At least six regions have reported cases that can be directly traced to the days-long congregation at a mosque. Delhi officials are now clearing the building, where more than 1,000 people have been stranded since the government imposed a lockdown last week.

  • Indian police fire tear gas at jobless workers defying coronavirus lockdown
    Reuters

    Indian police fire tear gas at jobless workers defying coronavirus lockdown

    Police in India fired tear gas to disperse a stone-pelting crowd of migrant workers defying a three-week lockdown against the coronavirus that has left hundreds of thousands of poor without jobs and hungry, authorities said on Monday. Prime Minister Narendra Modi ordered the country's 1.3 billion people to remain indoors until April 15, declaring such self-isolation was the only hope to stop the viral pandemic. But the vast shutdown has triggered a humanitarian crisis, with hundreds of thousands of poor migrant laborers employed in big cities such as Delhi and Mumbai seeking to head to their homes in the countryside on foot after losing their jobs.

  • Taliban kill dozens of Afghan forces in two attacks
    AFP

    Taliban kill dozens of Afghan forces in two attacks

    The Taliban have killed about two dozen Afghan police and pro-government fighters, officials said Monday, in two attacks that come as the foes are supposed to be preparing for peace talks. In one of the incidents Sunday, the insurgents killed at least six soldiers and 13 police and pro-government militiamen at several outposts near a police headquarters building in northeastern Takhar province, provincial police spokesman Khalil Assir told AFP. A wedding party was being held in the building at the time, but the attackers did not reach the headquarters.

  • Wuhan's death toll could be astronomically higher than the Chinese government has reported, some residents say
    Business Insider

    Wuhan's death toll could be astronomically higher than the Chinese government has reported, some residents say

    Associated Press Officials in Wuhan, China, reported that 2,535 people in the city have died from COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus. But some residents contest the official death toll, citing an increase in the shipment of urns to the city's eight funeral homes. "The incinerators have been working round-the-clock," one resident told Radio Free Asia.

  • Prisoners riot in Iran; Netanyahu goes into self-quarantine
    Associated Press

    Prisoners riot in Iran; Netanyahu goes into self-quarantine

    Prisoners in southern Iran broke cameras and caused other damage during a riot, state media reported Monday, the latest in a series of violent prison disturbances in the country, which is battling the most severe coronavirus outbreak in the Middle East. Israel meanwhile announced that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will enter self-quarantine after an aide tested positive for the virus. His office says the 70-year-old leader has undergone a test and will remain in quarantine until he receives results or is cleared by the Health Ministry and his personal doctor.

  • First minor with coronavirus in New York City dies
    NBC News

    First minor with coronavirus in New York City dies

    The first death of a minor who tested positive for coronavirus in New York City was reported Monday, as the city's death toll rose to 790. Like the majority of those who have died from COVID-19, the minor had an underlying health condition. While the vast majority of COVID-19 deaths in the United States have been among people above 18-years-old, this is not the first U.S. death of a minor.