Hitler Went Crazy When the Allies Stole This Critical Technology

Warfare History Network
By USAAF - U.S. DefenseImagery photo VIRIN: DF-ST-83-04095, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5710173

Warfare History Network

Security, Europe

All about the radar.

Hitler Went Crazy When the Allies Stole This Critical Technology

Frost’s men were joined by Lieutenant Dennis Vernon’s detachment of airborne Royal Engineers. Since the force would spend some of its rare free time in the town’s pubs, the paratroopers were told that they were training for an important demonstration, a practice attack on the Isle of Wight. Understandably, that notion aroused little enthusiasm within C Company, even after its men were told that if the demonstration went well a real raid into France might follow. Frost, of course, was soon told the real objective, but could not tell his men.

Through the long, lovely days of the summer of 1940, Royal Air Force Spitfire and Hurricane fighter planes turned back the might of the Luftwaffe over southern and southeastern Britain. The Battle of Britain was won by the professionalism and courage of a handful of young pilots, by just enough of two fine fighter aircraft, and by a sophisticated system of fighter direction.

At the heart of British ability to concentrate outnumbered fighter assets against the mass of German attackers lay radar, then a relatively unheralded device. Britain had the lead in radar development, but it was no secret that the Germans were working on it as well.

England and Germany Locked in Technology Race

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