HK's legislature becomes protest battleground

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Digital: NO USE HONG KONG, NO USE TAIWAN, NO RESALE, MUST ON SCREEN COURTESY CAMPUS TV HKUSU, MUST ON SCREEN COURTESY TANYA CHAN. * *~

A second day of chaos in Hong Kong's legislature - rebel lawmakers took turns to protest as Chief Executive Carrie Lam tried to speak.

One by one, around a dozen pro-democracy lawmakers were dragged out the chamber chanting protest slogans.

For a second day, Lam was forced to leave the chamber, with proceedings suspended.

Every time she tried to re-enter, another lawmaker would interrupt proceedings.

Lam was due to face questions over her annual policy address - which she was forced to unveil via a video link on Wednesday (October 16), after some lawmakers staged a similar protest against her.

The protests, which began over a now-withdrawn extradition bill with China, have caused months of disruption inside this building.

Back in May there was an actual brawl between lawmakers.

In July, black-clad protesters broke in and ransacked the building.

And now - even after its restoration, it's far from business as usual.

By the end of Thursday's (October 17) session, only a handful of pro-democracy lawmakers remained sitting. Their colleagues had all been chased out the room.

The sounds of protest have become a familiar noise in the city.

And heading into the weekend, one of the city's biggest pro-democracy groups have another peaceful march planned.

The head of that group, Jimmy Sham, was rushed to the hospital Wednesday (October 16) evening - after a bloody attack that some lawmakers said might be a part of a plan to shed blood on peaceful protests:

(SOUNDBITE) (English) PAN-DEMOCRAT LAWMAKER, KENNETH LEUNG, SAYING:

"This is not a single incident since, July this year, more than seven legislators, district council candidates have been under vicious attacks and got hurt."

Protesters say they won't stop until all their demands are met.


But Lam offered no direct olive branch in her annual policy address.

Hoping instead to ease resentment by building more public housing.