Holidays for the rich: airlines slam UK plan

Airlines have slammed Britain's plans for restarting international travel.

They say expensive testing rules for trips to low-risk countries would mean that only wealthy people could take holidays abroad.

Under government proposals, airlines and passengers will not find out until early May whether international travel resumes from May 17th.

The industry says it needs more clarity.

Airlines and travel companies have been pummelled by the global health crisis.

And are desperate for a bumper summer.

The government has proposed a traffic light system, with countries falling into red, amber or green categories based on infection risks.

Green countries will require a PCR test which costs about 100 pounds, or $135, for travellers arriving back in the UK.

Airlines UK, an industry body which represents British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, Virgin Atlantic and others described it as "a further setback for an industry on its knees."

EasyJet says the cost of the test it is higher than some of its fares.

The government says it wants to make testing for travel cheaper and suggested that in time, the PCR test could be changed for a more affordable lateral flow test.

Video Transcript

- Airlines have slammed Britain's plans for restarting international travel. They say expensive testing rules for trips to low risk countries would mean that only wealthy people could take holidays abroad. Under government proposals, airlines and passengers will not find out until early May whether international travel resumes from May the 17th.

The industry says it needs more clarity. Airlines and travel companies have been pummeled by the global health crisis and are desperate for a bumper summer. The government has proposed a traffic light system with countries falling into red, amber, and green categories, based on infection risks. Green countries will require a PCR test, which costs about 100 pounds or $135 for travelers arriving back in the UK.

Airlines UK, an industry body, which represents British Airways, easyJet, Ryanair, Virgin Atlantic, and others described it as a further setback for an industry on its knees. EasyJet says the cost of the test is higher than some of its fares. The government says it wants to make testing for travel cheaper and suggested that in time, the PCR test could be changed for a more affordable lateral flow test.