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  • Ghislaine Maxwell was arrested at a $1 million luxury 4-bedroom New Hampshire house that was bought last year in cash
    INSIDER

    Ghislaine Maxwell was arrested at a $1 million luxury 4-bedroom New Hampshire house that was bought last year in cash

    REUTERS/Drone Base Ghislaine Maxwell was arrested Thursday at a $1 million house where authorities say she was hiding since the death of Jeffrey Epstein. Maxwell, a longtime friend of Epstein, was arrested on charges connected to the Epstein case. An FBI official said Maxwell "slithered away to a gorgeous property in New Hampshire, continuing to live a life of privilege while her victims live with the trauma inflicted upon them years ago."

  • Judge blocks Portland police from using physical force against journalists
    The Independent

    Judge blocks Portland police from using physical force against journalists

    The order comes after the police arrested journalists who were covering a protest on Tuesday. One of them, Lesley McLam, was taken into custody. The restraining order declares that the police “are enjoined from arresting, threatening to arrest, or using physical force directed against any person whom they know or reasonably should know is a journalist or legal observer … unless the police have probable cause to believe that such individual has committed a crime”.

  • Two people critically injured after car plows into protesters on Seattle freeway
    USA TODAY

    Two people critically injured after car plows into protesters on Seattle freeway

    A 27-year-old Seattle man was arrested Saturday after his white Jaguar struck and critically injured two women during a protest along a closed stretch of Interstate 5 in downtown Seattle, state police said. The driver, Dawit Kelete, of Seattle, was booked on two counts of vehicular assault and denied bail. Troopers did not know if the incident was a targeted attack, but impairment was not considered a factor, Washington State Patrol Capt. Ron Mead said.

  • Five ways Hong Kong has changed under China's security law
    AFP

    Five ways Hong Kong has changed under China's security law

    Beijing's new national security law for Hong Kong is the most radical shift in how the semi-autonomous city is run since it was handed back to China by Britain in 1997. China's authoritarian leaders say the powers will restore stability after a year of pro-democracy protests and will not stifle freedoms. A key pillar of Hong Kong's success has been an independent judiciary, insulated from mainland China's party-controlled courts and their conviction rates of around 99 percent.

  • Why U.S. F-35s, Stealth Bombers and Attack Drones Could Fail in a War
    The National Interest

    Why U.S. F-35s, Stealth Bombers and Attack Drones Could Fail in a War

    Fighter jets, stealth bombers, attack drones and air-traveling missiles all need to “operate at speed” in a fast-changing great power conflict era. When faced with fast, multi-frequency, long-range precision fire from enemy air defenses, air attackers simply must “operate at speed,” according to U.S. Air Forces, Europe Commander General Jeffrey Harrigian, who used the phrase in a discussion with The Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies. Harrigian, who is also now the Commander of U.S. Air Forces Africa, ran much of the air campaign during Operation Inherent Resolve against ISIS; he offered a first-hand war perspective in a conversation with retired Lieutenant General David Deptula, Dean of the Mitchell Institute.

  • Copenhagen's Little Mermaid labelled 'racist fish'
    Reuters

    Copenhagen's Little Mermaid labelled 'racist fish'

    Denmark woke up on Friday to the words "racist fish" scrawled across the base of the "Little Mermaid", the bronze statue honouring Hans Christian Andersen's famous fairy tale that perches on a rock in the sea off a pier in Copenhagen. "We consider it vandalism and have started an investigation," a spokesman for the Copenhagen police said. Protesters of the Black Lives Matter movement around the world have in recent months rallied against statues of historical figures who played a role in racist oppression, such as slave traders and colonialists.

  • 'How the hell are we going to do this?' The panic over reopening schools
    Politico

    'How the hell are we going to do this?' The panic over reopening schools

    Yet the beginning of the school year is nearing and worried parents are wondering if they will be able to count on in-person classes resuming by the time they must return to work, inextricably tying school reopenings to the revival of the economy. In Virginia, Fairfax County's teachers unions say teachers aren't comfortable returning to schools and are encouraging members to state their preference for online learning until more information about face-to-face instruction is available. In Texas, the governor is now requiring face masks in public spaces in counties with 20 or more Covid-19 cases — but his order didn't mention schools.

  • Japan flooding: Many feared dead in flooded care home
    BBC

    Japan flooding: Many feared dead in flooded care home

    Fifteen people are believed dead and nine are missing on Japan's southern island of Kyushu as devastating rains cause flooding and landslides. Fourteen victims were found in the same flooded nursing home while the other was pulled from a landslide. The deaths have yet to be formally certified.

  • New mutation of coronavirus spreads disease more easily, warns Fauci
    The Telegraph

    New mutation of coronavirus spreads disease more easily, warns Fauci

    A mutation of coronavirus able to spread more easily may have emerged, America's top infectious disease expert has warned as Texas made mask-wearing in public mandatory. Dr Anthony Fauci, who sits on the White House coronavirus task force, said there is data to suggest the existence of a new mutation of Covid-19 which is more “transmissible”. Texas, one of the states seeing a surge in both case numbers and hospitalisations, announced new restrictions ordering the use of face masks in certain situations.

  • Michael Cohen may have violated the terms of his prison release by eating out at a restaurant in Manhattan
    Business Insider

    Michael Cohen may have violated the terms of his prison release by eating out at a restaurant in Manhattan

    The New York Post obtained photos showing Michael Cohen eating out at a Manhattan restaurant Thursday night. Cohen is currently serving a three-year sentence under home confinement, and eating out appears to be a violation of the conditions of his release from a federal prison camp. Business Insider reached out to the Bureau of Prisons for comment but did not immediately receive a response Saturday morning.

  • Huge bird of prey catches shark-like fish and flies off in viral video
    The Independent

    Huge bird of prey catches shark-like fish and flies off in viral video

    Visitors to a beach last week would have seen a shark-like fish soaring above their heads thanks to one bird's actions. A video shared online showed one huge predatory bird seen with what appeared to be a shark suspended in its claws above crowds at South Carolina's Myrtle Beach. The woman who witnessed the stunt, Kelly Burbage, shared the video online on Friday where she appealed for wildlife experts to name the fish and the bird.

  • For nearly 160 years, St. George has been known as Utah's 'Dixie.' The name is all over the city. Is it time to change?
    USA TODAY

    For nearly 160 years, St. George has been known as Utah's 'Dixie.' The name is all over the city. Is it time to change?

    It doesn't take long to notice a familiar pattern when it comes to one particular word in St. George, Utah. The word has been subject to much controversy in St. George over the years — and now the debate is back. In the wake of the death of George Floyd, which sparked a worldwide Black Lives Matter and protests against racial inequality and police brutality, there's been a renewed drive to abolish statues and symbols with ties to the Confederacy, white supremacy and historical racial violence.

  • US, China left out as England slashes quarantine list
    AFP Relax News

    US, China left out as England slashes quarantine list

    Travellers from more than 70 "low-risk" countries and territories will no longer have to self-isolate when arriving in England, the UK government said Friday in a major easing of its coronavirus quarantine scheme. The list of exemptions mostly covers Europe -- but not Portugal -- and the Caribbean, Australia and New Zealand, although the United States and mainland China are notably omitted. The changes, which come into effect on July 10, represent a significant lifting of the mandatory 14-day self-quarantine imposed one month ago to stop new infections from abroad.

  • It Would Cost Trillions: The Day North Korea Collapses
    The National Interest

    It Would Cost Trillions: The Day North Korea Collapses

    The prospect of a peaceful Korean Unification, however remote it seems, would be a historical event worth planning for. Hoping for the best means there is a scenario where North Korea's collapse and regime change occur miraculously, opening doors to South Korea and the West to take over North Korea in what one hopes would be a peaceful absorption. In November 1989, West and East Berliners flocked to what was one of the most heavily guarded borders in the world and tore down parts of the Berlin Wall that had divided Germany for twenty-eight years.

  • U.S. Supreme Court blocks Alabama order easing voting restrictions
    Reuters

    U.S. Supreme Court blocks Alabama order easing voting restrictions

    Alabama requires voters to submit a photo identification when they apply for an absentee ballot, and it requires that ballot to be returned along with the signature of two witnesses or a notary. A U.S. district court judge in Birmingham, Alabama's largest city, issued a ruling in June that would have effectively freed voters from the photo I.D. requirement, in some counties, if they are 65 or older or have a disability. Under that ruling, voters with medical conditions that put them at risk of COVID-19 could sidestep the requirement to have their ballots signed by a witness.

  • School districts pushed to reopen say there isn't enough money to do it safely
    NBC News

    School districts pushed to reopen say there isn't enough money to do it safely

    A move like bringing on a second teacher who could teach half her students in another classroom seems highly unlikely, given her school district's budget is facing a $14 million deficit. "They have already tried to cut anywhere humanly possible," said Spies, 46, who worries that because she donated a kidney to her aunt in 2011, she would be at risk for complications if she gets COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. "With the safeguards they are attempting to have in place, I just don't know where they're going to get the money, or even the manpower, to ensure it's all happening."

  • Concern over coronavirus mars Trump's Mount Rushmore trip
    Yahoo News Video

    Concern over coronavirus mars Trump's Mount Rushmore trip

    President Trump will visit Mount Rushmore in South Dakota for a Fourth of July celebration, despite controversy about large crowd gatherings during the coronavirus pandemic.

  • India Kanpur: Eight policemen killed in clash with gang members
    BBC

    India Kanpur: Eight policemen killed in clash with gang members

    Eight Indian policemen have been killed, and seven more injured, in an encounter with gang members, reports say. The officers were fired upon during a raid in search of a notorious local gangster in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh. The gangster, Vikas Dubey, is accused in 60 criminal cases for various offences, including attempted murder.

  • Crusading ex-cop's arrest sparks police pushback in Russia
    AFP

    Crusading ex-cop's arrest sparks police pushback in Russia

    Supporters of the stocky, blue-eyed 35-year-old say that the real reason for his arrest is his Police Ombudsman project, a series of linked social media accounts dedicated to protecting police officers' rights and exposing abuse by their superiors. His case has sparked a rare public outcry among police, a key pillar of President Vladimir Putin's rule, that could eventually spell trouble for the Kremlin, observers say. Vorontsov has spent two months in pre-trial detention and on Thursday a Moscow court extended his arrest until August.

  • 5 Americans who flew by private jet to Italy were reportedly denied entry due to the EU ban on visitors from countries with high coronavirus infection rates
    Business Insider

    5 Americans who flew by private jet to Italy were reportedly denied entry due to the EU ban on visitors from countries with high coronavirus infection rates

    Five Americans who attempted to enter Italy after flying on a private jet to the island of Sardinia were rejected because of the EU's coronavirus restrictions. The travellers eventually flew out of the airport 14 hours after they first landed, CNN reported. Italy was once the worst-hit country but appears to have controlled its outbreak, while the US is still dealing with virus peaks.

  • Two women fight for lives after driver ploughs into preparations for anti-racism rally in Seattle
    The Telegraph

    Two women fight for lives after driver ploughs into preparations for anti-racism rally in Seattle

    SEATTLE (AP) _ Two women were struck by a car whose driver sped through a protest-related closure on a freeway in Seattle, authorities said early Saturday. A 24-year-old woman from Seattle suffered critical, life-threatening injuries and a 32-year-old woman from Bellingham had serious injuries, Washington State Patrol Capt. Ron Mead said. The driver, a 27-year-old man from Seattle, was in custody, Mead said, adding that impairment was not considered a factor.

  • 3 police officers have been fired over a photo in which cops took a selfie reenacting the chokehold used on Elijah McClain
    INSIDER

    3 police officers have been fired over a photo in which cops took a selfie reenacting the chokehold used on Elijah McClain

    Family photo/Handout via REUTERS Three Aurora, Colorado, police officers have been fired over a photograph that was taken near a memorial for 23-year-old Elijah McClain last year. The photo featured officers Jaron Jones, Erica Marrero, and Kyle Dittrich, smiling and reenacting the chokehold that the police used on McClain before he died. The officers had sent the picture to Jason Rosenblatt, one of three officers involved in McClain's death.

  • Just How Powerful Are China's Aircraft Carriers?
    The National Interest

    Just How Powerful Are China's Aircraft Carriers?

    Here's What You Need To Remember: China definitely still has a long way to go. Two aircraft carriers that are based on 1980s technology are in no way close to as capable as modern nuclear-powered carriers. While one of the United States' aircraft carriers, the USS Theodore Roosevelt is dealing with a corona virus outbreak that has now become deadly, one of China's aircraft carriers sailed past Taiwan in a show of force.

  • Trump has a plan to stay in the White House if he loses election, former senator says
    The Independent

    Trump has a plan to stay in the White House if he loses election, former senator says

    The former Democratic senator begins with an allegation that Mr Trump will attempt to retain power through voter suppression. Mr Wirth alleges there is a strategy to suppress voter turnout by purging voters - especially inner-city voters - from registration rolls and to suppress mail-in voting. He also believes physical polling locations will be limited, especially in urban areas, in an effort to create long lines on Election Day and discourage voting.

  • WHO sees first results from COVID drug trials within two weeks
    Reuters

    WHO sees first results from COVID drug trials within two weeks

    The World Health Organization (WHO) should soon get results from clinical trials it is conducting of drugs that might be effective in treating COVID-19 patients, its Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said on Friday. "Nearly 5,500 patients in 39 countries have so far been recruited into the Solidarity trial," he told a news briefing, referring to clinical studies the U.N. agency is conducting. "We expect interim results within the next two weeks."