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House Republicans could target Liz Cheney's committee assignment

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House Republicans have already stripped Rep. Liz Cheney of her leadership post. Now, they have one procedural tool left to punish the House member from Wyoming over what they view as political apostasy for repeatedly criticizing former President Donald Trump.

The House Republican Conference could, in theory, take away Cheney's sole committee assignment on the Armed Services panel. It's an option more GOP lawmakers could come to view favorably as the work of the Jan. 6 commission ramps up.

Cheney, at least for now, is the only Republican who will be a member of the select committee charged with investigating the Jan. 6 riots at the Capitol, when Trump supporters tried to disrupt the Electoral College count in the House and Senate, which made Joe Biden the next president. Cheney agreed to be a select committee member and was tapped for the role by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

On Tuesday, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy withdrew his five appointees after Pelosi nixed two of them, Reps. Jim Banks of Indiana and Jim Jordan of Ohio.

That leaves Cheney largely alone in the Republican Conference. As for taking away her committee assignments, GOP leaders, for now, are largely mum on the possibility.

McCarthy, a California Republican, told the Washington Examiner Thursday, when pressed whether Cheney would lose her committee assignment over her position on the Jan. 6 appointment by Pelosi, a California Democrat, he replied, “I think it’s a conference decision.”

In early July, when Cheney's name first surfaced as a possible across-the-aisle appointment by Pelosi, McCarthy told reporters, “I’m not making any threats about committee assignments. But you know how Congress works.”

McCarthy added at the time, “You get elected by your district, and you get your committees from your conference," adding, "I don’t know in history where someone would go get their committee assignments from the speaker and expect to have them from the conference as well.”

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Since then, Cheney became a member of the committee through Pelosi’s appointment. And Cheney, Republican colleagues say, has become a more distant figure.

Cheney is often missing or seen by herself these days, according to GOP House lawmakers. The embattled Wyoming Republican seldom communicates with her fellow Republicans since she made it clear she thinks Trump encouraged rioters to attack the capitol on Jan. 6.

“She’s rejected the GOP, not the other way around,” a Midwestern GOP member told the Washington Examiner. “But I don’t see her anywhere. She doesn’t circulate the floor on the R side. She just sort of hides.”

Republican rank and file are particularly incensed at Cheney over her vocally supporting Pelosi’s rejection of the Jan. 6 committee appointments made by McCarthy.

“She’s fairly on her own and thinks she can maximize her influence by being on this committee, but she’s actually minimizing her ability to influence others,” a Western Republican lawmaker said, adding, “She’s effectively siding with Pelosi.”

Cheney defenders, though, reject the notion that she is a pariah among conference members and that her policy stances are as conservative, if not more so, as Republican lawmakers.

Cheney, a two-term member, who was removed from conference leadership as its chairwoman back in May, now sits in judgment of her own GOP colleagues on the Jan. 6 committee as the only Republican member presently appointed by Pelosi.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

Cheney, daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, backed up Pelosi’s rejection of Banks and Jordan. McCarthy, Cheney told reporters on Thursday, is politicizing the investigation and wants to “prevent the American people from understanding what happened to block this investigation.”

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Tags: News, Congress, Liz Cheney, Kevin McCarthy, January 6, Nancy Pelosi

Original Author: Kerry Picket

Original Location: House Republicans could target Liz Cheney's committee assignment

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