Hurricane center watches 3 new potential storms; 2 have 60% odds of development and higher

·2 min read

The National Hurricane Center was watching three areas of interest Tuesday, all with medium-to-high odds of becoming the next tropical depression or storm.

First, meteorologists are looking at a broad trough of low pressure, which is producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms in the southwestern Caribbean Sea, according to the NHC’s 8 p.m. update.

Not much development is in store for the short-term forecast. Still, Atlantic conditions increase favorably later this week, giving this disturbance a 20% chance of forming into a tropical depression in the next two days and a 60% chance of doing so in the next five across the Yucatan Peninsula, and then into the Gulf of Mexico by Sunday.

Next, the NHC has its eyes on a broad trough of low pressure producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms over the central tropical Atlantic. Forecasters are giving the disturbance a 20% chance of becoming a depression in the next two days and a 70% chance of doing so in the next five. The disturbance is expected to move northwest at 15 mph through an unideal environment for development. However, it should enter a calm, warm Atlantic zone by the end of the week, making the formation of a tropical depression very likely, the NHC said.

Finally, meteorologists are also keeping watch over a tropical wave about a few hundred miles south-southwest of the Cabo Verde Islands. The wave has become better organized, according to the NHC, and has a 20% chance of developing in the next two days and a 30% chance of doing so in the next five. Although, upper-level winds are forecast to act as a stymie from the wave’s development.

Presently, the wave is forecast to move westward at 10 to 15 mph over the eastern tropical Atlantic.

In order to become tropical storms and receive names, the system would next organize a circular flow of air and require maximum sustained winds of 39 mph or more.

The following three tropical storm names are Ida, Julian, and Kate.

For now, none of the disturbances have a projected path toward Florida.

Jpedersen@orlandosentinel.com