Hurricane Fiona Becomes Category 4 Storm as It Heads for Bermuda, Canada While Caribbean Islands Recover

·3 min read
This aerial picture taken on September 20, 2022, shows a flooded area in Arecibo, Puerto Rico,
This aerial picture taken on September 20, 2022, shows a flooded area in Arecibo, Puerto Rico,

AFP via Getty Flooding in Puerto Rico from Hurricane Fiona

Hurricane Fiona continues to strengthen as it barrels toward its next two main targets: Bermuda and Canada.

The National Hurricane Center upgraded Fiona to a Category 4 storm on Wednesday, with its maximum sustained winds reaching 130 mph. "Some additional strengthening" is predicted through Wednesday night.

The storm is expected to hit Bermuda late Thursday, with 2 to 4 inches of rain predicted for the island, per the NHC's forecast.

The U.S. State Department has urged travelers to reconsider visiting Bermuda "due to the potential impact of Hurricane Fiona" in a travel advisory issued Tuesday.

RELATED: Hurricane Fiona: How You Can Help People in Puerto Rico

Hurricane Fiona has already left mass devastation in places like Puerto Rico, which was left entirely without power on Monday as the storm slammed into the island as a Category 1 storm.

Puerto Rico: In an aerial photo, floodwaters surround houses
Puerto Rico: In an aerial photo, floodwaters surround houses

Caribbean Air and Marine Branch/ZUMA Press Wire Flooding in Puerto Rico from Hurricane Fiona

The hurricane dropped 6 to 20 inches of rain on the island, which triggered landslides and floods that damaged homes, washed-out bridges and brought down power lines, according to USA Today.

Keith Turi, FEMA assistant administrator for recovery, said at least four people have died in the Caribbean, per the report.

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Many Puerto Ricans have fled the devastation, which comes five years after Hurricane Maria ravaged the island. Andy Roldan told ABC affiliate WCVB that the situation in there "is critical right now."

Carmen Peña also told WCVB that the situation at home is "bad."

"We didn't have radio. No light. No water. Nothing," Peña said at Boston Logan International Airport on Tuesday, shortly after his flight from Puerto Rico landed.

"I just called my aunt and asked her if they have any help," he continued. "They said no."

man clings to a concrete beam in Ponce, Puerto Rico during flooding
man clings to a concrete beam in Ponce, Puerto Rico during flooding

125th Military Police Battalion/ZUMA Press Wire Man in Puerto Rico gets stuck the floodwaters caused by Hurricane Fiona

Yolanda Rivera told CBS affiliate WBZ-TV that she and her loved ones "stayed in one room in a little corner that was safe, for a whole night" without any light whatsoever.

"We didn't want to stay there," Rivera told the outlet. "But that's really sad; that's the place you were born."

RELATED: Hurricane Fiona Creates 'Catastrophic' Floods and Power Outages In Puerto Rico

Governor Pedro Pierluisi requested a major disaster declaration on Tuesday following the "catastrophic" damage caused to Puerto Rico, according to USA Today.

Three days after the storm, only 26% of the population's power had been restored, per the outlet. More than a million people remain without power as of Wednesday morning, according to PowerOutage.us.

Neighbors work to recover their belongings after the flooding caused by Hurricane Fiona in the Los Sotos neighborhood of Higüey, Dominican Republic
Neighbors work to recover their belongings after the flooding caused by Hurricane Fiona in the Los Sotos neighborhood of Higüey, Dominican Republic

Ricardo Hernandez/AP/Shutterstock Family in Puerto Rico cleans up after Hurricane Fiona hits

The Dominican Republic is also struggling following Hurricane Fiona, with nearly 2 million customers left without water as of Tuesday evening, according to Major General Juan Méndez García, reports CNN.

Over 600 homes have been damaged in the Dominican Republic, as have at least 23 roads and 18 bridges, García added.

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Bermuda is Fiona's next target on Thursday, followed by portions of Canada on Friday. Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and western Newfoundland could see about 3 to 6 inches of rainfall from the storm, though some localities could see up to 10 inches of rain.

"Fiona is forecast to be a hurricane-force cyclone through Saturday," the NHC said on Wednesday.