'I'm a recovering politician': Al Gore shoots down prospect of running for office again

'I'm a recovering politician': Al Gore shoots down prospect of running for office again
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Al Gore speaks during a Q&A following a special screening of "An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power" at Event Cinemas Bondi Junction on July 10, 2017 in Sydney, Australia.
Al Gore speaks during a Q&A following a special screening of "An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power" at Event Cinemas Bondi Junction on July 10, 2017 in Sydney, Australia.Brendon Thorne/Getty Images for Paramount Pictures
  • Al Gore said he wouldn't consider another presidential bid.

  • The former vice president has been a leader in climate change advocacy over the past decades.

  • He said there needs to be more public sentiment on the issue.

Former Vice President Al Gore on Sunday shot down the idea of running for president — again.

"You know, I'm a recovering politician. And the longer I go without a relapse, the less likely one becomes," Al Gore told NBC's "Meet The Press," host Chuck Todd on Sunday.

Gore, who ran unsuccessfully for president in 2000, was responding to a question on if he'd consider running on a climate change platform similar to Washington Gov. Jay Inslee's 2020 bid. Gore, who won an Academy Award in 2006 for his climate change documentary "An Inconvenient Truth," has been an outspoken climate change activist for decades.

The former vice president said elections in countries such as Australia and Brazil could change their governments to pro-climate majorities and wants to see that kind of sea change in the US on the issue as well.

"Public sentiment is changing very dramatically, but we need more grassroots action on the part of Americans, not only in the upcoming congressional races and the presidential race in 2024, but in the local races, and in the state elections, as well," Gore said.

"We, the people, have to solve this. And we have to instruct those who are in positions of leadership to start doing the right thing."

He added, "Our survival as a species may depend upon it."

 

 

 

 

 

Read the original article on Business Insider