India hits infections record amid second wave

Vaccination centers in Maharashtra, India, were running out of doses and closing their doors, as India reported another record number of new COVID-19 infections and daily deaths at their highest for more than five months - 780 - on Friday.

The country is battling a second wave and inoculating about four million people a day, but there's a shortage of vaccine in places.

India's caseload is just over 13 million, the world's third-highest after the United States and Brazil.

Total deaths stand at more than 167,000.

The government has resisted imposing a national lockdown, but some states have expanded restrictions and police are enforcing night curfews in most cities.

The curbs have prompted migrant workers to cram onto trains back to their villages from major cities, risking spreading the outbreak further.

The government blames the resurgence mainly on crowding and a reluctance to wear masks.

But critics say India's leaders let down their guard after quelling the first surge late last year.

And have allowed and encouraged large gatherings such as festivals and religious events, as well as election rallies led by Prime Minister Narendra Modi and other major figures.

Most attendees haven't worn masks.

Video Transcript

- Vaccination centers in Maharashtra, India, were running out of doses and closing their doors. As India reported another record number of new COVID-19 infections and daily deaths at their highest for more than five months, 780 on Friday. The country is battling a second wave and inoculating about four million people a day. But there's a shortage of vaccine in places.

India's caseload is just over 13 million, the world's third highest after the United States and Brazil. Total deaths stand at more than 167,000. The government has resisted imposing a national lockdown, but some states have expanded restrictions and police are enforcing night curfews in most cities. The curbs have prompted migrant workers to cram onto trains back to their villages from major cities, risking spreading the outbreak further.

The government blames the resurgence mainly on crowding and a reluctance to wear masks. But critics say, India's leaders let down their guard after quelling the first surge late last year, and have allowed and encouraged large gatherings such as festivals and religious events, as well as election rallies held by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, and other major figures. Most attendees haven't worn masks.