Indiana Jones 5's Steven Spielberg replaced as director with James Mangold expected to take the helm

Joe Anderton
Photo credit: Paramount

From Digital Spy

Indiana Jones 5 has been a long time coming, but things are finally moving forward under Disney.

Unfortunately for fans who want to see Steven Spielberg direct Harrison Ford and his famous hat one more time, the legendary Schindler's List helmer has stepped down from directing the movie.

Variety has reported that Spielberg will remain with the project as hands-on producer, but chose to pass on the role of director to someone else so the younger generation could lead the franchise forward.

Photo credit: Paramount

Related: The surprisingly complex timeline of the Indiana Jones universe

Although a deal hasn't been closed just yet, it has been reported that Logan director James Mangold is in talks to helm the film, which would be great news indeed.

Harrison Ford recently explained why the film is taking so long.

He explained to HeyUGuys: "We've got some scheduling issues and a few script things to do but we are determined to get it right before we get it made."

Photo credit: Paramount

Related: 11 times Indiana Jones was actually kind of a douchebag

Meanwhile, Lucasfilm producer Kathleen Kennedy reiterated that the team were knocking the script into shape and that the film wouldn't actually be a reboot.

Instead, it's being described as a continuation (you'd think Harrison Ford starring would be a giveaway but you never know nowadays what these companies are planning).

"We're working away, getting the script where we want it to be. And then we'll be ready to go," she said while speaking to BBC News earlier this month.

Indiana Jones 5 is currently scheduled to be released by Disney on July 9, 2021.

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