Indiana woman said she couldn't move legs after vacationing in Dominican Republic

Justin Chan
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Indiana woman said she couldn't move legs after vacationing in Dominican Republic

An Indiana woman said she mysteriously fell sick while vacationing at an all-inclusive resort in the Dominican Republic in February, WTHR reports

An Indiana woman said she mysteriously fell sick while vacationing at an all-inclusive resort in the Dominican Republic in February, WTHR reports

Kristie Dilly told the station that she and her husband, along with two friends, had decided to spend eight days at the Bahia Principe resort in La Romana. The trip initially went well, she said. 

"We were able to eat, drink, play, excursions, golf, whatever we could imagine right there at the resort," Dilly recalled.

Things, however, took a turn for the worse toward the end of the trip. 

"Once day seven hit, I became very ill," she said. "Knowing I was leaving the next morning gave me a lot of comfort."

Unfortunately, Dilly said, her symptoms got worse on the flight back home.  

"Sweating profusely, every joint and muscle in my body was aching from my toes to my forehead; I was trembling, I couldn't swallow," she explained. "I couldn't move my legs, even out of the way for stewardesses to get through. I mean, I was just so ill."

After Dilly returned home, she said she immediately went to the hospital to get treated, but doctors were unfortunately unable to determine the cause of her sickness. They eventually gave her medication for her kidneys, which she said she'll have to take for the rest of her life. 

Dilly allegedly got sick just six weeks before Pennsylvania psychotherapist Miranda Schaup-Werner died at the same resort on May 25. Schaup-Werner was celebrating her ninth anniversary with her husband, Daniel Werner, when she allegedly collapsed after having a drink in her room. Authorities later determined that she died of respiratory failure and pulmonary edema. 

Five days after Schaup-Werner's death, Maryland couple Edward Nathaniel Holmes and Cynthia Day were found dead in their room at the resort as well. Police said they discovered medication for high blood pressure and determined that the two had also died of respiratory failure and pulmonary edema. 

Since June 2018, more than 10 suspicious deaths have occurred at resorts throughout the Dominican Republic. Many of them have involved the consumption of suspicious alcohol or the use of hotel amenities. Other victims include New Yorker Donette Edge Cannon, Pennsylvania woman Yvette Monique Sport, Maryland resident David Harrison, Californian Robert Wallace, Ohio resident Jerry Curran, California resident Robert Turlock, New York resident Leyla Cox, New Jersey resident Joseph Allen, New York resident Vittorio Caruso and Colorado resident Khalid Adkins.

Following reports of their deaths, the number of American tourists traveling to the Caribbean nation has since dropped significantly, according to CBS News. Flight bookings from the U.S. to the Dominican Republic, for example, dropped 74.3 percent from June 1 to June 19 compared to last year.  

Still, Dominican officials have insisted that their country is safe. 

"People die all over the world," Ministry of Public Health spokesman Carlos Suero told Fox News last month. "Unfortunately, very unfortunately for us, these tourists have died here. We had about 14 deaths last year here of U.S. tourists, and no one said a word. Now everyone is making a big deal of these."