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Inside the tiny house revolution

Katie Couric
·Global Anchor
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By Jenny Dubin

Yahoo Global News Anchor Katie Couric goes inside the tiny house movement to take a look at the revolutionary trend and learn how people are living small in both rural areas and the big city.

Everywhere you look these days, it seems less is more. And it’s not just hipsters who are saying no to living large. Texas empty nesters Jodi and Fred Zipp built a getaway that’s anything but a McMansion.

Graham Hill, the founder of LifeEdited, says that while Americans have supersized their households over the past 60 years, it hasn’t made them any happier. Hill is focused on designing and developing homes big on efficiency and small on space … starting with his own.

By 2050, two-thirds of the world’s population will reside in cities, and that’s got a lot of people thinking about livable — even moveable — spaces.

Jeff Wilson, a college professor in Austin, Texas, challenged himself to live in a 33-square-foot dumpster for a year as part of an experiment in living with less. That gave birth to his company, Kasita, dedicated to the concept.

Hill says that ultimately, living small leaves people with less to manage and gives them more time so folks can focus on experience, which is the stuff that he believes actually makes people happy.

For more information regarding the furniture in Graham Hill’s apartment, contact Resource Furniture.