Inside the tragic last months of ex-Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh's life

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Hello everyone! Welcome to this weekly roundup of Business Insider stories from co-Editor in Chief Matt Turner. Subscribe here to get this newsletter in your inbox every Sunday.

Read on for the reporting on former Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh's final months, tips on how to get a job in the Biden administration, and the rising stars of real estate.

Ton Hsieh graphic
Ton Hsieh graphic

Tony Hsieh spent most of his last nine months in Park City, Utah, where he flew in new contacts and created a community amidst the pandemic. Chris Farina/Corbis via Getty Images

Hello!

We're nearly there.

COVID-19 vaccines are expected to be approved by US regulators in the coming days. And as Shelby Livingston and Allana Akhtar reported, health systems and hospitals across the country are now gearing up to give the shots to their own workers.

Three healthcare systems - Intermountain Healthcare in Utah, Northwell Health in New York, and McLaren Health Care in Michigan - shared their plans on vaccinating staff. You can read the full story here:

  • 'This is game time': Hospitals across the country are gearing up to give the first COVID-19 shots to millions of healthcare workers

Also read:

  • OPINION: There's light at the end of the COVID tunnel, I just don't see it yet.

Tony Hsieh's final months

From Meghan Morris and Connor Perrett:

A fire truck and an ambulance whirred into one of Park City's tonier enclaves the Tuesday evening after Labor Day, summoned to action by an alarming report.

At a 9-bedroom estate, recently purchased by a newcomer to the picturesque ski town, there were "flames shooting into the air" and a hot air balloon was "going off," according to the fire department's logs.

It's not clear if something had gone wrong with the balloon, or what it was doing at the residential property on a Tuesday night - the report only notes that no one required medical attention and that emergency responders left after 45 minutes.

But five nights later they were back again, this time for reports of an "illegal burn" at the mansion, where they discovered propane heaters hidden in trees and a large stash of wood intended for an open fire. The mansion belonged to Tony Hsieh, the longtime CEO of internet ecommerce powerhouse Zappos.

For a period of several months during the summer of 2020, Hsieh's property was the site of extravagant parties that drew a crowd of techies, free-spirits, hangers-ons, and locals - and often complaints from neighbors.

You can read the full story here:

  • Tony Hsieh sold Zappos for $1.2 billion in his 30s. He was dead by 46. Inside his final Park City months, where he hoped to deliver more happiness as he spiraled.

How to land a job in the Biden administration

Biden transition
Biden transition

U.S. President-elect Joe Biden speaks to the media after receiving a briefing from the transition COVID-19 advisory board on November 09, 2020 at the Queen Theater in Wilmington, Delaware. Mr. Biden spoke about how his administration would respond to the coronavirus pandemic. Joe Raedle/Getty Images

From Robin Bravender:

So you want to go work for Joe Biden.

You're in luck. The president-elect has thousands of jobs to dole out inside the White House and federal agencies.

But you'll probably want to get moving quickly since the incoming team is anxious to get up to full strength as it races to replace outgoing Trump administration staffers with its own people. You're not the only one hoping to get a job on the new team, and you can expect stiff competition.

"There will be tens of thousands of people who are very excited about this administration and want to be a participant in it," says Katherine Archuleta, who led the Obama administration's Office of Personnel Management, the federal agency that manages government employees.

Read the full story here:

  • Joe Biden is hiring about 4,000 political staffers to work in the White House and federal agencies. Here's how you can boost your chances getting a job in the new administration, according to 3 experts.

Also read:

  • Brad Parscale starts talking. Trumpworld frets.

  • Biden wants to move beyond the Trump era. But the Justice Department and New York state might not be so ready to play along.

  • Don Jr. eyes a run for NRA chief. It's one more way the Trump family is making big plays to cement itself in GOP conservative politics for the next 4 years.

Rising stars of real estate

2x1
2x1

NorthSpyre; CBRE; Luna Hamdi; Basis Investment Group; Yuqing Liu/Business Insider

From Alex Nicoll, Dan Geiger, Libertina Brandt, and Natasha Solo-Lyons:

The pandemic has upended the real-estate industry, forcing offices and shops to reinvent themselves and causing millions of Americans to relocate or reconsider their home bases for work, financial, or personal reasons.

Against this backdrop, we're spotlighting professionals who are thriving, seizing opportunities despite, or because of, COVID-19's effects on commercial and residential real estate in the US.

These 30 young professionals stood out as the vanguard of the next generation in real estate, from prodigies who've risen through the ranks and innovated at established firms to startup founders looking to disrupt pockets of the sector with deeply traditional roots.

Read the full story here:

  • Meet 2020's rising stars of real estate, the young visionaries making waves at big-name firms like CBRE and Compass and industry-shaking startups

Also read:

  • Jared Kushner's name is radioactive in real estate right now. Some developers and investors say they're avoiding deals with his family's company, while others report they're getting penalized for past partnerships.

  • How Joe Biden's housing policy threatens real-estate investing

ICYMI: Inside Google's firing of a top AI researcher

Timnit Gebru
Timnit Gebru

Timnit Gebru, co-lead of Google's ethical artificial intelligence team Kimberly White/Getty Images

On Wednesday, one of Google's top AI ethics leaders announced she had been fired. Observers were confused by the decision, but inside Google, tensions between Timnit Gebru and senior management had been building for days, Hugh Langley reported. Read the full story here:

  • Inside Google's firing of a top AI researcher, and the academic paper that started the battle: 'People are seriously pissed'

Also read:

  • DeepMind's protein-folding breakthrough triggers fierce debate among skeptical scientists: 'Until they share their code, nobody in the field cares'

WATCH: How to get hired in private equity

Reed Alexander this week spoke with Matt Breitfelder, the global head of human capital at Apollo Global Management; Sara Diniz, vice president in human resources at Bain Capital; James Cherubim, head of talent acquisition at The Carlyle Group; and Anthony Keizner, co-managing partner at Odyssey Search Partners.

You can watch their conversation here:

  • 4 private-equity recruiting execs from top firms like the Carlyle Group, Apollo, and Bain Capital break down how to land a job in the ultra competitive PE world

Here are some headlines from the past week that you might have missed.

- Matt

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