Intel provides STEM crafts, virtual reality at Hartford Fair

·3 min read
Christa Flores (right), a STEM educator with Intel Future Skills, helps Silas Hamlin, 6, troubleshoot his design for a ScribbleBot made with markers, a plastic cup, and some circuitry while he works with his mom Brittany Hamlin and sisters Blakely, 2, Bellamy, 3, and Isla, 4, on different STEM activities at Intel's booth at the Hartford Independent Fair on Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2022 at the Hartford Fairgrounds. Intel will host a both from 3 p.m. - 8 p.m. through Friday with stem activities, information, and other activities for Licking County families. The program aims to teach kids skills like patience, grit, and embracing mistakes as well as technical skills like design and creative problem solving.
Christa Flores (right), a STEM educator with Intel Future Skills, helps Silas Hamlin, 6, troubleshoot his design for a ScribbleBot made with markers, a plastic cup, and some circuitry while he works with his mom Brittany Hamlin and sisters Blakely, 2, Bellamy, 3, and Isla, 4, on different STEM activities at Intel's booth at the Hartford Independent Fair on Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2022 at the Hartford Fairgrounds. Intel will host a both from 3 p.m. - 8 p.m. through Friday with stem activities, information, and other activities for Licking County families. The program aims to teach kids skills like patience, grit, and embracing mistakes as well as technical skills like design and creative problem solving.

CROTON − Intel Corporation’s manufacturing of computer chips in Licking County won’t begin until 2025, but the company provided a glimpse into its facilities and technology Wednesday at the Hartford Fair.

The company showcased its capabilities and provided Science, Technology, Engineering and Math crafts for children in a tent at the fair. Intel’s last day at the fair will be Friday.

More:Hartford Fair to kick off with first ever beer garden in Croton

The reactions from fairgoers who visited the Intel displays was mostly positive, although one woman said, “They’re not going to buy me.”

Cara McLain, of Alexandria, said she sees a company trying to get involved in the community.

“I thought it was very fun for the kids, very interactive,” McLain said. “They’re learning science and don’t even realize it. I think they’re bringing jobs and I think they are trying to do right by the community they’ll be a part of. People are a little fearful of a large operation.”

Mike and Cathy Evans, of Utica, said they generally have a favorable view of Intel.

“We think it’s positive,” Cathy said. “We hate to see the farmland go.” Mike added, “But it brings jobs to the area.”

Dave Sahr works with daughters Sadie, 11, and Stella, 6, on a paper circuit project at Intel's booth at the Hartford Independent Fair on Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2022 at the Hartford Fairgrounds. Intel will host a both from 3 p.m. - 8 p.m. through Friday with stem activities, information, and other activities for Licking County families.
Dave Sahr works with daughters Sadie, 11, and Stella, 6, on a paper circuit project at Intel's booth at the Hartford Independent Fair on Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2022 at the Hartford Fairgrounds. Intel will host a both from 3 p.m. - 8 p.m. through Friday with stem activities, information, and other activities for Licking County families.

Intel begins construction this year on the largest commercial development in Ohio history, a $20 billion computer chip manufacturing operation which could grow to a $100 billion investment, just south of Johnstown, on Jersey Township land annexed into New Albany.

The company expects production to start in 2025 and employment to reach 3,000, with an average wage of $135,000. The project is also expected to create 7,000 construction jobs and 10,000 indirect jobs.

Emily Smith, the Intel director of Ohio Public Affairs, said the Intel Future Skills projects were brought to life through the company’s skill-based volunteer program. Employees donated their time and talent at the fair to assist the children.

“Based on the same design thinking methodology used by our world’s top innovators, Intel Future Skills is a proven learning platform that builds a student’s confidence and capacity for creative problem solving,” Smith said.

“Students are challenged with hands-on, real-world innovation projects that encourage them to think differently, fail fast, and develop a growth mindset.”

The activities included scribble bot, a simple robot created to autonomously scribble or draw on paper; slime recipes, created and tested before the child concocts a new slime creation of their own design; and paper circuits, which uses simple materials of conductive tape, LEDs, and a coin-cell battery to build a flat paper circuit.

Licking Valley senior Daniel McNeal works on a paper circuit project at Intel's booth at the Hartford Independent Fair on Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2022 at the Hartford Fairgrounds. Intel will host a both from 3 p.m. - 8 p.m. through Friday with stem activities, information, and other activities for Licking County families.
Licking Valley senior Daniel McNeal works on a paper circuit project at Intel's booth at the Hartford Independent Fair on Wednesday, Aug. 10, 2022 at the Hartford Fairgrounds. Intel will host a both from 3 p.m. - 8 p.m. through Friday with stem activities, information, and other activities for Licking County families.

There are also interesting activities and displays for adults, including a Positronic egg-shaped chair providing a 360-degree video experience, using Intel Immersive Cinema with a virtual reality headset.

The 6-minute virtual reality experiences include: First Man: Journey to the Moon; Scent of a Song musical by A R Rahman; and How to Train Your Dragon.

Three flat video screens provide a 360-degree tour of Intel fabrication facilities in Oregon.

A LumoPlay sports experience of a soccer game uses an Intel Realsense camera and a Intel NUC PC to monitor motion of the players and allow them to play virtual soccer.

A robot, called a Mini-Gita, made by Piaggio Fast Forward, follows the user and carries items for them.

Fair Manager Rod Arter said Thursday the Intel booth has been very popular, answering questions people have about the newcomer to the community.

“Everybody wants to know what it’s about," Arter said. "They want you to understand they’re going to be a good neighbor. They’re reaching out to the youth. That’s their main focus. We’ve had good crowds. It's working well for them.”

kmallett@newarkadvocate.com

740-328-8545

Twitter: @kmallett1958

This article originally appeared on Newark Advocate: Intel provides STEM crafts for kids, virtual reality at Hartford Fair