Iran says 'smart satellite' killed top scientist

The killing of Iran's top nuclear scientist last month was aided by artificial intelligence, and a "satellite-controlled smart system" remotely operating a machine gun mounted on the back of a pick-up truck.

That's reportedly according to a senior military commander in the country.

The semi-official Tasnim news agency quoted Ali Fadavi of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards as saying on Sunday (December 6) that no terrorists were on the ground as Mohsen Fakhrizadeh was gunned down in his car.

Iran has blamed Israel and a foreign-based opposition group for the assassination, while Israel has neither confirmed or denied the allegation.

The Islamic Republic has given contradictory details since Fakhrizadeh's death. His car is said to have been ambushed on a highway near Tehran on November 27.

Israeli security cabinet minister Yoav Galant even said he was "not aware" such technologies described in the Iranian accounts existed.

But the Iranian commander, Fadavi, said "during the operation artificial intelligence and face recognition were used," and cited that Fakhrizadeh's wife who was also in the car was not injured.

He'd been speaking after Iranian authorities said they had found "clues about the assassins," though they have yet to announce any arrests.

Video Transcript

- The killing of Iran's top nuclear scientist last month was aided by artificial intelligence and a satellite-controlled smart system remotely operating a machine gun mounted on the back of a pickup truck. The semi-official Tasnim news agency quoted Ali Fadavi of Iran's Revolutionary Guard as saying on Sunday that no terrorists were on the ground as Mohsen Fahkrizadeh was gunned down in his car.

Iran has blamed Israel and a foreign-based opposition group for the assassination while Israel had neither confirmed or denied the allegation.

The Islamic Republic has given contradictory details since Fahkrizadeh's death. His car is said to have been ambushed on a highway near Tehran on November 27. Israeli security cabinet minister Yoav Galant said even he was not aware such technologies described in the Iranian accounts existed, but the Iranian commander, Fadavi said, quote, "during the operation, artificial intelligence and face recognition were used" and cited the fact that Fahkrizadeh's wife, who was also in the car, was not injured.

He'd been speaking after Iranian authorities said that they had found clues about the assassins, though they have yet to announce any arrests.