Irritated by loss, Trump avoids talk of future

Hunkered down in what one former White House official called the “presidential man cave” of the Oval Office, President Donald Trump does not want to talk about what lies ahead once he leaves office next month.

With this week’s Electoral College vote certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s win, White House staffers are searching for their next jobs. First lady Melania Trump has looked for a school in Florida, where the couple is expected to reside, for their son Barron, People magazine reported.

Trump, however, wants no conversation about the future beyond the White House – that includes, for now, any talk of another run in 2024.

He has largely closed himself off from the public in recent weeks, communicating mostly through tweets – and has done little to show he is focused on governing other than speaking at an event about coronavirus vaccine development, during which he continued his unsubstantiated claims of fraud in the presidential election.

Nor has he played a significant role in responding to the computer hack that targeted the U.S. government, one administration official said.

Trump on Twitter continues to encourage lawmakers to help him in his bid to overturn the election result - and is irked at top Senate Republican Mitch McConnell for finally announcing this week that he considers Biden the president-elect.

Meanwhile, outside the White House, a cacophony of noise erupts daily from the construction of platforms for Biden’s Inauguration Day events on January 20th.

Trump has in the past toyed with the idea of announcing a 2024 run on Inauguration Day to divert attention from Biden, a source said.

But some have advised him to delay such an announcement, because being an official candidate could invite an immediate and heightened level of scrutiny he may not want.

Trump faces a range of civil and criminal legal actions related to his family’s businesses and his activities before he took office, which could accelerate once he loses the legal protections granted to him by the presidency.

Video Transcript

- Hunkered down in what one former White House official called the presidential man cave of the Oval Office, President Donald Trump does not want to talk about what lies ahead once he leaves office next month. With this week's Electoral College vote certifying President-elect Joe Biden's win, White House staffers are searching for their next jobs. First Lady Melania Trump has looked for a school in Florida where the couple is expected to reside for their son Barron, "People" magazine reported.

Trump, however, wants no conversation about the future beyond the White House. That includes, for now, any talk of another run in 2024. He has largely closed himself off from the public in recent weeks, communicating mostly through tweets, and has done little to show he is focused on governing other than speaking at an event about coronavirus vaccine development during which he continued his unsubstantiated claims of fraud in the presidential election.

DONALD TRUMP: You can't have fraud and deception and all of the things that they did.

- Nor has he played a significant role in responding to the computer hack that targeted the US government, one administration official said. Trump on Twitter continues to encourage lawmakers to help him in his bid to overturn the election result.

MITCH MCCONNELL: So today I want to congratulate President-elect Joe Biden.

- And he's irked a top Senate Republican, Mitch McConnell, for finally announcing this week that he considers Biden the president-elect.

Meanwhile, outside the White House, a cacophony of noise erupts daily from the construction of platforms for Biden's Inauguration Day events on January 20. Trump has in the past toyed with the idea of announcing a 2024 run on Inauguration Day to divert attention from Biden, a source said. But some have advised him to delay such an announcement because being an official candidate could invite an immediate and heightened level of scrutiny he may not want.

Trump faces a range of civil and criminal legal actions related to his family's businesses and his activities before he took office, which could accelerate once he loses the legal protections granted to him by the presidency.