ITALY'S TOUGHER LOCKDOWN RESTRICTIONS WILL BE IN PLACE FROM THURSDAY UNTIL MARCH 25 - PRIME MINISTER'S OFFICE

ITALY'S TOUGHER LOCKDOWN RESTRICTIONS WILL BE IN PLACE FROM THURSDAY UNTIL MARCH 25 - PRIME MINISTER'S OFFICE

  • Liberty University students choose sides after fallout from coronavirus reporting
    Yahoo News

    Liberty University students choose sides after fallout from coronavirus reporting

    The New York Times reported this week that almost a dozen Liberty University students have come down with COVID-19 symptoms since the school reopened last week, according to a bombshell article published Sunday that cites a local physician in Lynchburg, Va., where the evangelical university is situated. “We've lost the ability to corral this thing,” Dr. Thomas W. Eppes Jr. said he told Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr., according to the article. The Times identified Eppes as the head of the school's student health service, but he does not appear on the Liberty University website and a school spokesman told Yahoo News he has no official connection to the university.

  • Russian plane with coronavirus medical gear lands in U.S. after Trump-Putin call
    NBC News

    Russian plane with coronavirus medical gear lands in U.S. after Trump-Putin call

    MOSCOW/WASHINGTON - Russia sent the United States medical equipment on Wednesday to help fight the coronavirus pandemic, a public relations coup for Russian President Vladimir Putin after he discussed the crisis with U.S. President Donald Trump. Trump, struggling to fill shortages of ventilators and personal protective equipment, accepted Putin's offer in a phone call on Monday. A Russian military transport plane left an airfield outside Moscow and arrived at New York's John F. Kennedy in late afternoon on Wednesday.

  • China's Shenzhen bans the eating of cats and dogs after coronavirus
    Reuters

    China's Shenzhen bans the eating of cats and dogs after coronavirus

    The Chinese city of Shenzhen has banned the eating of dogs and cats as part of a wider clampdown on the wildlife trade since the emergence of the new coronavirus. Scientists suspect the coronavirus passed to humans from animals. Some of the earliest infections were found in people who had exposure to a wildlife market in the central city of Wuhan, where bats, snakes, civets and other animals were sold.

  • Russian plane makes its way to U.S. with coronavirus medical equipment
    Yahoo News Video

    Russian plane makes its way to U.S. with coronavirus medical equipment

    A Russian military transport plane was headed to the United States on Wednesday carrying tons of medical equipment and masks to help Washington fight the coronavirus outbreak, Russian state TV reported and a U.S. official said.

  • North Korea insists it is free of coronavirus
    AFP

    North Korea insists it is free of coronavirus

    North Korea remains totally free of the coronavirus, a senior health official in Pyongyang has insisted, despite mounting scepticism overseas as confirmed global infections near one million. The already isolated, nuclear-armed North quickly shut down its borders after the virus was first detected in neighbouring China in January, and imposed strict containment measures. Pak Myong Su, director of the anti-epidemic department of the North's Central Emergency Anti-epidemic Headquarters, insisted that the efforts had been completely successful.

  • Navy says it can't empty Roosevelt amid coronavirus because of its weapons, nuclear reactor
    USA TODAY

    Navy says it can't empty Roosevelt amid coronavirus because of its weapons, nuclear reactor

    WASHINGTON – The coronavirus outbreak aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt escalated Wednesday as more sailors tested positive for the virus and U.S. Navy officials scrambled to respond to the desperate evacuation plea from the aircraft carrier's captain. As of midday Wednesday, 93 crew members had tested positive for the virus, and 593 tested negative, Thomas Modly, acting Secretary of the Navy, told reporters during a briefing Wednesday. There are approximately 5,000 crew members on board.

  • Social Security recipients won't need tax return to receive stimulus payment
    Politico

    Social Security recipients won't need tax return to receive stimulus payment

    Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin Wednesday announced that Social Security recipients would not have to file tax returns in order to receive coronavirus stimulus payments. The reversal comes after complaints from lawmakers that an IRS plan to require seniors to file simplified returns would place an undue burden on them amid widespread shutdowns and social distancing guidelines implemented in the wake of the coronavirus outbreak. In a statement, Mnuchin said: “Social Security recipients who are not typically required to file a tax return need to take no action, and will receive their payment directly to their bank account.

  • Defense lawyer in death of 7 motorcyclists: Biker at fault
    Associated Press

    Defense lawyer in death of 7 motorcyclists: Biker at fault

    One of the motorcyclists in a crash that killed him and six fellow bikers on a north woods highway was drunk and actually was the one who hit a pickup and caused the accident, the lawyer for the truck driver charged with homicide said in a document made public Tuesday. A New Hampshire State Police account of the June 21 crash in the community of Randolph “was deeply flawed," the lawyer for truck driver Volodymyr Zhukovskyy, 24, of West Springfield, Massachusetts, said in a motion filed Friday that seeks a hearing to set him free on bail. State police initially determined that the flatbed trailer he was hauling was 1 1/2 feet over the center line at the time of impact, the motion said.

  • An evangelical pastor who was charged after holding in-person church services says he doesn't like livestreams because he can't touch parishioners
    INSIDER

    An evangelical pastor who was charged after holding in-person church services says he doesn't like livestreams because he can't touch parishioners

    Tony Spell, an evangelical pastor at the Life Tabernacle Church in suburban Baton Rouge, Louisiana, faces six misdemeanor charges after continuing in-person church services despite the state's stay-at-home order. Spell has held several services with hundreds of people in attendance over the last several weeks, and on Tuesday hosted 300 people after being charged with violating the governor's order that bans large gatherings. As many churches turn to live streams to protect parishioners from the novel coronavirus, Spell told Insider he prefers in-person services, where he can "lay hands" on his congregation.

  • 28 Texas spring breakers who just returned from Cabo have tested positive for the coronavirus
    Business Insider

    28 Texas spring breakers who just returned from Cabo have tested positive for the coronavirus

    Victor Ruiz Garcia/Reuters Twenty-eight Texas spring breakers who recently vacationed in Cabo have tested positive for the coronavirus, tweeted Tony Plohetski of local station KVUE-TV. They chartered a plane with 70 people to get to Cabo, he said. Spring breakers, who are Gen Z, have been called out for crowding beaches and partying on booze cruises and ignoring calls for social distancing during the coronavirus pandemic.

  • US asks Juan Guaido to renounce claim to Venezuela leadership – for the time being
    The Independent

    US asks Juan Guaido to renounce claim to Venezuela leadership – for the time being

    The United States has called on Venezuela's Juan Guaido to temporarily renounce his claim to the presidency as it recalibrates its strategy to oust leader Nicolas Maduro. The shift came after more than a year of faltering US-led efforts to oust the leftist Mr Maduro. Mr Guaido came under growing pressure from authorities, who on Tuesday summoned him to answer charges of attempting a coup.

  • Reuters

    Israel links coronavirus aid for Gaza to recovering soldiers

    Israel on Wednesday linked any assistance it might offer for the Gaza Strip's efforts against coronavirus to progress in its attempt to recover two Israeli soldiers lost during the 2014 war in the Palestinian enclave. Blockaded and impoverished, Islamist Hamas-ruled Gaza has reported 12 coronavirus cases and authorities worry that local health facilities - with just 96 ventilators for a population of 2 million - are insufficient to contain a contagion. Both Israel and Hamas have closed the Gaza border to non-essential traffic as a precaution against the spread of the infection.

  • One country is refusing to shut down to stop the coronavirus
    NBC News

    One country is refusing to shut down to stop the coronavirus

    While officials from Montreal to Moscow have placed populations under some form of lockdown designed to slow the spread of the coronavirus, one man continues to hold firm to the notion that the rest of the world has lost its mind: Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko. “It is better to die on your feet than live on your knees!” Lukashenko told a Belarusian television reporter Saturday when asked whether the coronavirus could stop him from hitting the rink for a propaganda-filled hockey game. Lukashenko, one of the longest-serving leaders in the former Soviet Union, has been in power for over 25 years.

  • 12 Buildings That Show the Beauty of Deconstructed Architecture
    Architectural Digest

    12 Buildings That Show the Beauty of Deconstructed Architecture

    From Zaha Hadid's majestic MAXII in Italy to the stunning beauty of Frank Gehry's Vitra Design Museum, these structures elevate the environment they were built in Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • Angry Wuhan next-of-kin seek answers over virus handling
    AFP

    Angry Wuhan next-of-kin seek answers over virus handling

    Zhang took his elderly father to a Wuhan hospital for a surgical procedure in January, just as coronavirus was consuming the central Chinese city. Devastated and angry, Zhang is now demanding answers from a government that he accuses of incompetence and lying about the extent of the virus. Zhang says he has linked online with dozens of other people whose grief over lost loved ones is paired with anger.

  • Russia sends plane with medical supplies to U.S. for coronavirus response
    Politico

    Russia sends plane with medical supplies to U.S. for coronavirus response

    Russia is sending a planeload of masks and other supplies to help the United States fight the coronavirus pandemic as the number of cases threatens to top 200,000 across the country. The plane will arrive today, after President Donald Trump accepted an offer on Monday by Russian President Vladimir Putin to send personal protective equipment and other gear, a senior administration official confirmed to POLITICO. The Russian government first announced that the plane, an An-124 Ruslan cargo aircraft filled with equipment to help America battle the pandemic, was en route early today.

  • China is bracing for a second wave of coronavirus
    The Week

    China is bracing for a second wave of coronavirus

    A Chinese county that was largely unscathed by the novel COVID-19 coronavirus went into lockdown Wednesday, signaling fears of a possible second wave in the country where the virus originated, The South China Morning Post reports. The county of Jia in Henan province, home to 600,000 people, is now in lockdown after infections reportedly spread at a local hospital. There were previously only 12 confirmed cases in Henan, despite it being situated just north of Hubei province, where China's epicenter, Wuhan, is located.

  • Pakistan court overturns conviction in death of Daniel Pearl
    Associated Press

    Pakistan court overturns conviction in death of Daniel Pearl

    A Pakistani court on Thursday overturned the murder conviction of a British Pakistani man found guilty of the 2002 kidnapping and killing of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl. Instead, the court found Ahmed Omar Saeed Sheikh guilty of the lesser charge of kidnapping and sentenced him to seven years in prison. Pearl disappeared Jan. 23, 2002 in Karachi while researching links between Pakistani militants and Richard C. Reid, who became known as the “shoe-bomber” after he was arrested on a flight from Paris to Miami with explosives in his shoes.

  • A New Jersey doctor is the first emergency physician to die from coronavirus in the US
    USA TODAY

    A New Jersey doctor is the first emergency physician to die from coronavirus in the US

    An East Orange General Hospital doctor on Wednesday became the first emergency physician to die from likely coronavirus complications, the American College of Emergency Physicians said in a statement. Frank Gabrin, 60, of New York City died in his husband's arms just days after he developed symptoms consistent with those of the virus. "He was just an amazing man," said Debra Vasalech Lyons, who was friends with Gabrin for 20 years.

  • Nancy Pelosi's idea to retroactively lift the limit on state and local tax deductions would be almost useless for people who need the most help
    Business Insider

    Nancy Pelosi's idea to retroactively lift the limit on state and local tax deductions would be almost useless for people who need the most help

    Business Insider Tom Brenner/Reuters Pelosi is calling for another economic relief package to get more equipment for embattled healthcare workers, as well as relief for households. The House speaker said one measure under consideration is retroactively repealing the SALT cap, which puts a $10,000 limit on the amount of state and local tax deductions that households can claim each year on their tax bill. But that measure would disproportionately benefit richer households, and leave out the vast majority of middle-class ones from getting any money.

  • Latest on the spread of the coronavirus around the world
    Reuters

    Latest on the spread of the coronavirus around the world

    Transport hubs that should be teeming with travellers such as New York's Grand Central Terminal or Istanbul's Eminonu ferry docks are all but deserted. * Italy will extend lockdown restrictions to April 13, as data from this week suggests a slowdown of growth in total cases, though its national health institute says official death toll could be underestimated. * Cases in Spain topped 100,000 on Wednesday, and two planes with protective equipment arrived to restock an overloaded public health system.

  • Shenzhen becomes first Chinese city to ban eating cats and dogs
    BBC

    Shenzhen becomes first Chinese city to ban eating cats and dogs

    Shenzhen has become the first Chinese city to ban the sale and consumption of dog and cat meat. It comes after the coronavirus outbreak was linked to wildlife meat, prompting Chinese authorities to ban the trade and consumption of wild animals. Shenzhen went a step further, extending the ban to dogs and cats.

  • U.S. is swiftly deporting migrant children at the border
    CBS News

    U.S. is swiftly deporting migrant children at the border

    Citing a public health order to curb the coronavirus pandemic, the Trump administration is swiftly deporting unaccompanied migrant minors apprehended near the U.S.-Mexico border, upending a long-standing practice required under a federal law designed to protect children from violence and exploitation. Despite initially maintaining that the new measures would not apply to unaccompanied minors, Customs and Border Protection on Monday said its officials could deny entry to children who cross the southern border alone under an order by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC. The agency said some minors could be excluded from the CDC directive if a border official "suspects trafficking or sees signs of illness."

  • Japan expands ban on visitors as virus cases climb
    AFP

    Japan expands ban on visitors as virus cases climb

    Japan will bar visitors from the United States, China and most of Europe, the prime minister said Wednesday, as the country seeks to stem a recent rise in coronavirus cases. The entry ban, which will also apply to Australia, Britain, South Korea and many Southeast Asia countries, will take effect on Friday, Shinzo Abe's government said. Japan had already barred arrivals from parts of several European nations, China and South Korea.

  • Coronavirus will be ‘imprinted on the personality of our nation for a very long time,’ Fauci warns
    Politico

    Coronavirus will be ‘imprinted on the personality of our nation for a very long time,’ Fauci warns

    Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, predicted on Wednesday that the effects of the coronavirus pandemic will be “imprinted on the personality of our nation” for years to come. The stark comments represented a new kind of diagnosis from the country's top infectious disease expert, who has emerged as a steadying fixture in the national consciousness as one of the leading administration officials working to both combat and better understand the public health crisis. In a podcast interview with CNN's Sanjay Gupta, the 79-year-old physician and immunologist elaborated on the “profound” mental and emotional burdens wrought by the novel coronavirus, made evident during conversations with his three daughters.