Ivanka Trump won't challenge Rubio for Florida Senate seat

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Fin Gómez
·1 min read
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Ivanka Trump will not be challenging Florida GOP Senator Marco Rubio for his U.S. Senate seat in 2022, a source close to President Trump's daughter confirmed to CBS News.

It was during a conversation between Ivanka Trump and Rubio a few weeks ago — not long after the rioting at the Capitol in January 6 — when she informed him of her decision not to run. 

In a statement provided to CBS News, Mr. Trump's daughter, who was one of his top White House advisers, called the Florida senator a "good personal friend."

"I know he will continue to drive meaningful progress on issues we both care deeply about," she said. 

Speculation among Florida politicos had ramped up after Ms. Trump, her husband, Jared Kushner, and their children, had moved to the Sunshine state from New York after her father's reelection loss to President Biden. The New York Times first reported that she would not run.

Another former senior White House official, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, is so far the top contender in her race for Arkansas governor. There has also been some speculation that Lara Trump, the wife of Mr. Trump's son, Eric Trump, could mount a political run in North Carolina for retiring GOP Senator Richard Burr's seat.

Rubio has not responded to a request for comment.

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