Jeff Goldblum On Being A Dad At 70: ‘It’s Revivifying’

Jeff Goldblum On Being A Dad At 70: ‘It’s Revivifying’

Jeff Goldblum became a father later on in life, and he wouldn't have it any other way.

The actor and musician, 70, who has two young children with his wife Emilie Livingston, stopped by Studio 6A on Thursday and sat down with Hoda Kotb and Jenna Bush Hager during their week of live shows.

While chatting with the pair, the "Jurassic World: Dominion" star opened up about what it's like to raise his two sons, Charlie, 7, and River, 5.

“So what is fatherhood like when you hit 70?” Hoda asked, and said she finds that being an older parent is “such fun.” The TODAY anchor, 58, has two young children herself: daughters Haley, 5, and Hope, 3.

“It’s amazing, it’s revivifying, and makes my relationship with Emilie, frankly, enhanced” Goldblum gushed.

Jeff Goldblum, wife Emilie Livingston, and sons Charlie Ocean Goldblum and River Joe Goldblum  (Axelle/Bauer-Griffin / FilmMagic)
Jeff Goldblum, wife Emilie Livingston, and sons Charlie Ocean Goldblum and River Joe Goldblum (Axelle/Bauer-Griffin / FilmMagic)

The proud husband went on to explain how having children makes marriage even more wonderful.

"Seeing (my wife) in this new role is unbelievable. She’s heroic beyond imagination," he said.

The family of four has a special dynamic that Goldblum cherishes, calling it "spectacular." But he's not afraid to admit that parenting is one tough job.

"And it’s challenging and it’s sometimes maddening and very volatile. As you know, at 3 and 5, 5 and 7 they can be like feral creatures unleashed. Oh yeah, and sweet and amazing. It’s great,” he said.

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Over the summer, Goldblum sat down with Sunday TODAY’s Willie Geist to chat about his own childhood and his love of performing.

“I was obsessed by it,” he said at the time.

Having parents who were on board with his desire to act was also extremely helpful for Goldblum.

“They were okay with it and supported it, and then before long I started to get jobs and make a living at it,” he said.

This article was originally published on TODAY.com