John McCain's Wife Cindy Makes It Clear She Will Not Campaign for 'Dear Friend' Joe Biden in 2020

Joelle Goldstein

Cindy McCain has nothing but good things to say about Joe Biden — but that doesn’t necessarily mean she’ll be backing his possible presidential campaign any time soon.

Following reports that Cindy, 64, and her family would be supporting Biden, 76, in an upcoming run for the presidency, the widow of John McCain quickly shut down those rumors.

In a tweet shared on Wednesday, Cindy explained that while Biden was a “dear friend” of hers, she did not plan on getting involved with any political campaigns.

“Joe Biden is a wonderful man and dear friend of the McCain Family,” she wrote. “However, I have no intention of getting involved in presidential politics.”

Cindy McCain and Joe Biden | Norm Hall/Getty Images; Bruce Glikas/Bruce Glikas/FilmMagic
Cindy McCain/Twitter

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On Tuesday, the Washington Post reported that the former vice president will at last officially announce his bid for the 2020 presidency.

The newspaper said that Biden will make the announcement this coming Thursday in a video and is expected to travel to Pittsburgh, Iowa, New Hampshire and South Carolina over the next week.

A day later, the Washington Examiner wrote in a story that “at some point during the White House race, McCain’s widow Cindy, 64, and daughter Meghan, 34, a host on The View, will offer their public support in the hope of removing Trump from office in 2020.”

It appears the report then prompted Cindy to speak out and deny those claims.

Joe Biden and Cindy McCain | Andreas Gebert/picture-alliance/dpa/AP Images

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Despite being on opposite sides of the political divide, Biden and the McCains have been close for quite some time. Before his death, Sen. McCain asked that Biden, his longtime friend and Senate colleague, deliver a eulogy in his honor, according to CBS News.

During John’s private memorial service at North Phoenix Baptist Church in Arizona in August, Biden tearfully explained how he “loved John McCain” and “always thought of John as a brother.”

Biden went on to recall how the two quickly “hit it off” when they first met in the 1970s, while John was serving as a liaison between the Navy and the Senate. The two later worked together in the U.S. Senate for more than 20 years.

He added that their “great friendship” transcended whatever political differences they had. “Because above all, we understood the same thing: All politics is personal. It’s all about trust,” Biden said. “I trusted John with my life.”

John McCain and Joe Biden (right) | AP/REX/Shutterstock

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John and Cindy’s daughter Meghan McCain also recently came to Biden’s defense after several women accused him of inappropriate behavior earlier this month.

“Joe Biden is one of the truly decent and compassionate men in all of American politics,” she tweeted. “He has helped me through my father’s diagnosis, treatment and ultimate passing more than anyone of my father’s friends combined.”

“I wish there was more empathy from our politicians not less,” The View co-host, 34, added.

Following the accusations, Biden vowed he would adjust to the changing social norms of personal space, as the intentions of his past actions were never to make anyone feel uncomfortable.

Meghan McCain and Joe Biden

RELATED: Joe Biden Vows to Respect Personal Space Following Accusations of Inappropriate Behavior

Biden, who served as vice president from 2009-2017 under President Barack Obama, previously argued he’s the best person to take office.

In December 2018, he told a crowd at the University of Montana, “I’ll be as straight with you as I can. I think I’m the most qualified person in the country to be president.”

“The issues that we face as a country today are the issues that have been in my wheelhouse, that I’ve worked on my whole life,” he continued.

“No one should run for the job unless they believe that they would be qualified doing the job,” he added at the time. “I’ve been doing this my whole adult life, and the issues that are the most consequential relating to the plight of the middle class and our foreign policy are things that I have — even my critics would acknowledge, I may not be right but I know a great deal about it.”