Julie Bindel wins case against council that ‘deplatformed’ her

Julie Bindel has won her legal case against Nottingham Council after it cancelled an event where she was due to speak - Ken McKay/ITV/Rex/Shutterstock
Julie Bindel has won her legal case against Nottingham Council after it cancelled an event where she was due to speak - Ken McKay/ITV/Rex/Shutterstock

Julie Bindel has won her legal case against Nottingham council after it cancelled an event where she was due to speak.

The radical feminist writer, lesbian activist and co-founder of the law reform group Justice for Women took legal action after local authority officials “deplatformed” her the day before her talk.

She claimed that she only found out that the 90-minute event at Aspley library, in Nottingham, in June had been cancelled - due to her gender-critical views - when she was on the train up from London.

She said she was paying her own expenses and had no plan to talk about transgender issues. She ended up speaking in the library car park.

'Implications for every single feminist’

Talking to The Telegraph about the case, Bindel said: “I got so sick of it basically. Every single time I was doing a talk, nothing to do about trans ideology but on the violence against women and how to counter it, the host or the venue were bullied out of it, so I was publicly deplatformed.”

Following her victory, Bindel said: “I consider it to be deeply offensive and problematic for public bodies to decide that I am too controversial and even dangerous for women to listen to when I am talking about campaigning to end rape and domestic abuse.

“I am a feminist campaigner. It is particularly important that women in deprived communities have the opportunity to come together.

“Public spaces which enable women to do so are essential. It is nothing short of outrageous that my voice is silenced when there are women requesting to hear it.

“Over the past decade and more, feminists have been rebranded as bigots and fascists and accused of discriminating against trans people for merely speaking about the experience of being women.

“If Nottingham City Council - or any public body - can ban me simply because they do not share my views, they can do that to any of us. This has implications for every single feminist.”

JK Rowling, the Harry Potter author, also took to Twitter to congratulate Bindel, saying:

In June, the council said it cancelled Bindel’s talk because of “the speaker’s views on transgender rights”. In a statement at the time, it said: “Nottingham is an inclusive city and as a council we support our LGBT community and have committed to supporting trans rights as human rights through Stonewall.”

Following the ruling on Friday, a spokesman for Nottingham City Council said that it “now accepts that its decision to cancel the event was procedurally unlawful”.

The spokesman added: “Nottingham City Council apologises to Ms Bindel and Nottingham Women for Change for cancelling the event in this way and for the inconvenience caused as a result of this decision.

“It has agreed to make payment to Julie Bindel, Nottingham Women for Change and to ticket holders in respect of their reasonable losses incurred as a result of the cancellation of the event.”

This was not the first time that Bindel has been no-platformed due to her gender-critical views. She has previously been accused of transphobia because she does not believe that trans women can legitimately say they are women.

In March, Bindel claimed she had been deplatformed after a talk she was due to give at the University of York was postponed at the last minute, following after an outcry from some students who accused her of holding views that are “biphobic, transphobic, and misogynistic”.