We Just Learned *So* Much About Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s Life in the U.S.

We Just Learned *So* Much About Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s Life in the U.S.
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We Just Learned *So* Much About Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s Life in the U.S.

Petition for Harry to get his own late-night show!

The cat is out of the bag: Prince Harry is now going by "Haz." But, the only caveat is, you must be his wife Meghan Markle in order to call him that—or James Corden. Corden and Haz took a tour of Los Angeles on the February 25th episode of The Late Late Show, and we learned so much about the Southern California lives of Harry and Meghan that we feel as though we could write a tell-all book.

However, the tell-all book of their current day-to-day might not be too interesting. According to Harry, a typical night in for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex looks pretty much the same any other couple with a young son. After giving Archie a bath and reading him a book, "we go downstairs, Meg might cook a meal, might order a takeaway, go upstairs, sit in bed, turn the TV on, watch some Jeopardy, maybe watch a little bit of Netflix," Harry told Corden.

And because we all want to know, Harry says Netflix's The Crown is "loosely based on the truth," but it's purely fictional. "It gives you a rough idea of what that lifestyle, what the pressures of putting duty and service above family and everything else, what can come from that." He did say, though, "I'm way more comfortable with The Crown than I am seeing the stories written about my family or my wife or myself."

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"He is hysterical," Harry told Corden of his son Archie, who is just over a year-and-a-half. "He's got the most amazing personality," and his first word was....crocodile. Okay, smarty pants.

"My grandmother asked what Archie wanted for Christmas, and Meg said a waffle maker. [Queen Elizabeth II] sent us a waffle maker...so breakfast now, Meg makes up a beautiful organic mix, in the waffle maker...he loves it." Thanks grandma, Lizzy.

The royal grandparents are also just as hilariously technically challenged as all grandparents are. They've Zoomed Harry and Meghan a few times and Harry said that instead of hitting "leave chat," Prince Phillip simply closes the computer with gusto.

He and Meghan moved to Santa Barbara after deciding to distance themselves from the royal lifestyle and British press. Though they are no longer senior members of the royal family, and have resigned from their posts and duties, Harry reaffirms that they never "walked away," but simply took a step back in order to protect their own mental health and family structure.

"My life is always going to be about public service, and Meghan signed up to that, and the two of us enjoy doing that," Harry said of life in Southern California post-lockdown. He admits he has no idea what that will actually look like, but knows that their mission will be the same stateside as it was in the U.K.—"trying to make people happy and trying to change the world in any small way that we can."

If Meghan and Haz being citizens of the U.S. means we'll be getting more late-night appearances from them, we may be more stoked for their new California phase than they are.