Kinzinger says Cipollone didn’t contradict ‘what anybody said’ in testimony

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Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.), a member of the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, said on Sunday the panel plans to detail portions of former Trump White House Counsel Pat Cipollone’s recent eight-hour testimony in its upcoming hearings.

“At no point was there any contradiction of what anybody said, but the rest I’ll have to leave to the presentation for the committee,” Kinzinger told George Stephanopoulos, anchor of ABC’s “This Week.”

Cipollone testified before the committee behind closed doors on Friday after the panel subpoenaed him late last month.

The subpoena came after explosive public testimony by Cassidy Hutchinson, who served as an aide to then-White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows.

Hutchinson told the House committee that Cipollone warned her “we’re going to get charged with every crime imaginable” if Trump went to the Capitol on Jan. 6 and urged Meadows to take action on the day of the riot.

Other moments of Hutchinson’s testimony have come into question after Secret Service agents reportedly indicated they were prepared to refute her allegations that Trump lunged for the steering wheel of his Secret Service vehicle on Jan. 6 in attempts to go to the Capitol.

Kinzinger’s comments on Sunday were in line with multiple other members of the House panel, who said on other Sunday talk shows that Cipollone did not contradict other witnesses.

“We’re not going to bring somebody in and just sit around and ask them about what other people said, too,” Kinzinger said on ABC. “We’re getting their information, their front, their position.”

The committee has scheduled its next public hearing for Tuesday morning.

Meanwhile, Oath Keepers leader Stewart Rhodes’s attorney said last week that he would be willing to testify again before the committee and waive his Fifth Amendment rights if it was live and in person.

The leader of the far-right militia group, who is currently incarcerated, had testified before the committee’s investigators for more than six hours in February in private.

“Any one of these things we’ll take a look at as long as it’s under oath,” Kinzinger said on Sunday when asked about Rhodes’s conditions.

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