Kobe Bryant tributes pour in at Super Bowl LIV one week after his death

Jack Baer
Writer
Kobe Bryant and his daughter Gianna Bryant are honored along with all of the helicopter crash victims before the NFL Super Bowl 54 football game between the San Francisco 49ers and Kansas City Chiefs Sunday, Feb. 2, 2020, in Miami Gardens, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

The tragic deaths of Kobe Bryant, his 13-year-old daughter Gianna and seven others in a helicopter crash have been felt throughout the sports world, so it was only natural they managed to reach its biggest stage.

A full week removed from the crash, tributes to Bryant showed up in full force at Super Bowl LIV at Hard Rock Stadium. It started with San Francisco 49ers cornerback Richard Sherman showing up to the game in an old Bryant All-Star jersey.

Kansas City Chiefs offensive lineman Cameron Erving made a similar fashion choice.

Sherman also recorded a pregame segment reciting a poem called “Dear Football,” which was more than a little similar to Bryant’s Oscar-winning short film “Dear Basketball.”

Several players also suited up with cleats dedicated to Bryant’s memory.

The official recognition of Bryant’s death came as all the players took the field. They lined up at the 24-yard line’, with a brief moment of silence held while the victims’ names were shown on the big screen.

The tributes continued after the game, with victorious Chiefs running back LeSean McCoy sporting a Bryant Lakers jersey in the locker room. McCoy described Bryant as his idol.

All of that goes to show just how much Bryant’s legacy reached beyond the basketball world. His death has been mourned everywhere, not just in the United States and not just among athletes and sports fans. He was truly a global cultural figure, and the loss of him and eight others still feels surreal.

More from Yahoo Sports

  • Trump on Stone sentencing: 'I'd love to see Roger exonerated'
    Yahoo News

    Trump on Stone sentencing: 'I'd love to see Roger exonerated'

    President Trump on Thursday weighed in on the sentencing of his longtime friend and ally Roger Stone to 40 months in federal prison for lying to Congress, obstruction and witness tampering. Speaking at a Las Vegas graduation ceremony at the city's Metropolitan Police Department headquarters for ex-offenders two days after issuing 11 pardons and commutations, Trump said he was following the Stone case “very closely,” and that “I'd love to see Roger exonerated. I want to see it play out to its fullest because Roger has a very good chance of exoneration in my opinion,” the president said.

  • A Google manager has been arrested and charged with murder after his wife was reported missing in Hawaii
    Business Insider

    A Google manager has been arrested and charged with murder after his wife was reported missing in Hawaii

    Hawaii Police Department Google product manager Sonam Saxena has been arrested in connection with the disappearance of his wife, Smriti Saxena. Smriti, who was a Microsoft business program manager, was reported missing by Sonam on Tuesday while the Seattle couple was vacationing in Hawaii. A body that could be Smriti's was discovered on a beach on Wednesday, and Sonam was arrested and charged with second-degree murder.

  • Racist German Shooter Exposes the Global Network of Hate
    The Daily Beast

    Racist German Shooter Exposes the Global Network of Hate

    Late Wednesday night in the central German city Hanau, a gunman that police have identified as 43-year-old Tobias Rathjen opened fire at two shisha bars. They're the kind of places favored by people who enjoy a laid-back atmosphere as they puff tobacco bubbling through water-filled hookahs, and on any given evening, many of those folks may be from Turkish, Kurdish, or North African backgrounds. They're quiet places for conversation and minding your own business.

  • Intelligence employee pleads guilty to leaking classified info to journalists
    USA TODAY

    Intelligence employee pleads guilty to leaking classified info to journalists

    WASHINGTON – Henry Kyle Frese pleaded guilty Thursday in federal court to illegally transmitting national defense information to journalists. Frese, 31, was employed as a counterterrorism analyst for the Defense Intelligence Agency from February 2018 to October 2019, and held a top-secret clearance. “Frese violated the trust placed in him by the American people when he disclosed sensitive national security information for personal gain,” said Assistant Attorney General for National Security John Demers in a statement.

  • US judge sides with migrants in case against Border Patrol
    Associated Press

    US judge sides with migrants in case against Border Patrol

    A U.S. judge in Arizona sided Wednesday with migrants who have long-complained about inhumane and unsanitary conditions in some U.S. Border Patrol facilities in the state. The ruling came weeks after the conclusion of a seven-day trial in which attorneys for migrants who sued in 2015 argued that the agency holds immigrants in extremely cold, overcrowded, unsanitary and inhumane conditions. The order makes permanent a preliminary injunction that U.S. District Court Judge David C. Bury issued in 2016 requiring the Tucson Sector to provide clean mats and thin blankets to migrants held for longer than 12 hours and to allow them to clean themselves.

  • China says will help manage Mekong as report warns of dam danger
    Reuters

    China says will help manage Mekong as report warns of dam danger

    VIENTIANE/BANGKOK (Reuters) - China on Thursday said it was helping its downstream neighbors cope with a prolonged drought by releasing more water from its dams on the Mekong River, adding it would consider sharing information on hydrology to provide further assistance in the future. The statement came as a new economic report predicted that the building of dams to harness hydropower on the Mekong River would reshape the economies of five countries along the waterway, fuelling long-term inflation and dependence on China. The drought over the past year has severely hurt farming and fishing in Laos, Thailand, Cambodia, Myanmar and Vietnam, and many blame China's 11 dams on the upper Mekong - which China calls the Lancang River - as well as climate change.

  • Chuck Todd gets existential with billionaire Michael Bloomberg: 'Should you exist?'
    The Week

    Chuck Todd gets existential with billionaire Michael Bloomberg: 'Should you exist?'

    Some of former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's rivals don't think he should exist. Or rather, they don't think the billions of dollars he has in the bank should've ever been his. So during Wednesday night's Democratic, Meet The Press host Chuck Todd posed the very meta question to Bloomberg himself.

  • Elizabeth Warren trolls Republican donor with ad in his paper telling him how much tax she'll make him pay
    The Independent

    Elizabeth Warren trolls Republican donor with ad in his paper telling him how much tax she'll make him pay

    Elizabeth Warren has bought ad space in a newspaper owned by Republican mega-donor Sheldon Adelson, taunting the billionaire with an estimate for how much he would pay during the first year of her presidency with her promised 2 per cent wealth tax. “With that small wealth tax, we can invest in Nevada families,” it continues. Ms Warren's ad was printed in the newspaper the morning after she seemed to dominate the Democratic debate in the same city by mounting a full-throated attack on another billionaire, democratic presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg.

  • 9 Rural Farms of the 21st Century Featuring Stunning Modern Design
    Architectural Digest

    9 Rural Farms of the 21st Century Featuring Stunning Modern Design

    From Italy to Tasmania, a new book covers those farms with an eye on both sustainability and beautiful design Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • Rohrabacher confirms he offered Trump pardon to Assange for proof Russia didn't hack DNC email
    Yahoo News

    Rohrabacher confirms he offered Trump pardon to Assange for proof Russia didn't hack DNC email

    Former California Republican congressman Dana Rohrabacher confirmed in a new interview that during a three-hour meeting at the Ecuadorian Embassy in August 2017, he told Julian Assange he would get President Trump to give him a pardon if he turned over information proving the Russians had not been the source of internal Democratic National Committee emails published by WikiLeaks. In a phone interview with Yahoo News, Rohrabacher said his goal during the meeting was to find proof for a widely debunked conspiracy theory: that WikiLeaks' real source for the DNC emails was not Russian intelligence agents, as U.S. officials have since concluded, but former DNC staffer Seth Rich, who was murdered on the streets of Washington in July 2016 in what police believe was a botched robbery.

  • South Korea accepted that its efforts to stop the coronavirus infecting the country failed, and says it's pivoting to containment
    Business Insider

    South Korea accepted that its efforts to stop the coronavirus infecting the country failed, and says it's pivoting to containment

    With coronavirus cases soaring, the government in South Korea said Friday that it has failed to keep the virus out of the country, and must now focus on containment. It is the most-infected place outside China. The country has urged people in a city of 2.5 million people to stay in their homes and banned some public gatherings.

  • Virginia lawmakers reject assault weapons ban over fears of potential civil war
    Yahoo News Video

    Virginia lawmakers reject assault weapons ban over fears of potential civil war

    Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam's push to ban the sale of assault weapons has failed after members of his own party balked at the proposal. Senators voted to shelve the bill for the year and ask the state crime commission to study the issue, an outcome that drew cheers from a committee room packed with gun advocates.

  • Man who bought 100-round magazine for Dayton mass shooter sentenced to 32 months
    USA TODAY

    Man who bought 100-round magazine for Dayton mass shooter sentenced to 32 months

    Corrections & Clarifications: Ethan Kollie bought the upper receiver for the semiautomatic rifle used by Connor Betts. CINCINNATI — A man who bought the 100-round magazine and parts for the assault-style rifle used by Connor Betts in last year's mass shooting in Dayton was sentenced Thursday to 32 months in prison. Prosecutors say Ethan Kollie didn't appear to know about Betts' plans.

  • Airport worker with no license takes plane for spin near D.C., almost crashes, feds say
    NBC News

    Airport worker with no license takes plane for spin near D.C., almost crashes, feds say

    A Virginia man piloted at least one plane without a license in 2018, in a dangerous journey that ended with a "bounced" landing, federal authorities said. Ryan Guy Parker "knowingly and willfully" flew above suburban Washington D.C., posing a "significant risk of injury and death" to himself and the public, according to an affidavit by U.S. Department of Transportation Special Agent Bret Stolle. In a Sept. 27, 2018 trip out of Shannon Airport in Fredericksburg, Parker nearly crashed on touch down, Stolle wrote.

  • Debate shows Bernie Sanders could win most votes but be denied nomination
    The Guardian

    Debate shows Bernie Sanders could win most votes but be denied nomination

    Amid the Mike Bloomberg pile-on and the Pete Buttigieg-Amy Klobuchar squabbling, there was a key point that slipped by almost unnoticed during Wednesday's tumultuous Democratic debate – one that could potentially prevent Bernie Sanders from becoming the nominee. Towards the end, each of the six candidates was asked if – at the Democratic national convention this summer in Milwaukee – they would support the person who has won the most delegates – even if that person hasn't achieved a majority. It might seem a wonky, opaque detail, but it raises the prospect that Sanders, who has a commanding lead in the polls and has emerged as the frontrunner, could win the most pledged delegates – those allocated on the basis of votes during the marathon Democratic primaries – but be swindled, at the last, by the Democratic party elite.

  • Bloomberg Downplays Chinese Pollution: ‘It’s India That Is Even a Bigger Problem’
    National Review

    Bloomberg Downplays Chinese Pollution: ‘It’s India That Is Even a Bigger Problem’

    Former New York city mayor Mike Bloomberg downplayed China's contribution to climate change during Wednesday night's Democratic debate, arguing that the rapidly industrializing superpower has “slowed down” its  pollution in recent years. While China has made progress in curbing emissions in recent years, it remains the world's largest emitter of carbon dioxide due to its massive population and commensurate manufacturing base. Bloomberg has repeatedly defended the Chinese Communist Party in the past, and said in September that “Xi Jinping is not a dictator,” when asked a similar question on PBS's Firing Line on how to limit China's greenhouse emissions.

  • Democrat Warren, worried campaign will run out of cash, taps $3 million loan
    Reuters

    Democrat Warren, worried campaign will run out of cash, taps $3 million loan

    NEW YORK/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren raised more money than most of her Democratic presidential rivals in the weeks before the Iowa caucuses, but spent so heavily that her campaign took out a $3 million loan fearing she would run out of cash. Warren raised $10.4 million in contributions in January -- more than former Vice President Joe Biden's $9 million and former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg's $6 million -- but ended the month with only $2.3 million in cash, according to disclosures filed on Thursday. All of the presidential hopefuls were required to submit financial disclosures on Thursday, public documents that offer insights into how they are managing their multi-million campaign operations.

  • A police officer was fired and told to immediately turn in his uniform at a town meeting, so he stripped down to his underwear and walked home in the snow
    INSIDER

    A police officer was fired and told to immediately turn in his uniform at a town meeting, so he stripped down to his underwear and walked home in the snow

    Richard Lee, the police chief of Croydon, New Hampshire, had a cold walk home Tuesday night. At a town hall meeting that evening, Lee was stripped of his duties as the only police officer in Croydon. In turn, he stripped down to his underwear so that he could return his uniform, according to the New Hampshire Union Leader.

  • Don't Sleep on Russia's Super-Fast "Avangard" Hypersonic Missile
    The National Interest

    Don't Sleep on Russia's Super-Fast "Avangard" Hypersonic Missile

    Key point: Why have a regular missile, when you can have a faster hypersonic one that is harder to shoot down? That is the logic behind Russia's impressive Avangard missile. Russian President Vladimir Putin's March 1, 2018 annual annual state-of-the-nation address became his most-cited since his 2007 Munich speech.

  • The Mormon Church's secretive $100 billion fund revealed huge stakes in Apple, Google, and Microsoft. Here are its 10 biggest holdings.
    Business Insider

    The Mormon Church's secretive $100 billion fund revealed huge stakes in Apple, Google, and Microsoft. Here are its 10 biggest holdings.

    The Mormon Church's secretive $100 billion investment fund revealed massive stakes in Microsoft, Apple, and other tech titans for the first time this month. Ensign Peak Advisors, the investing arm of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, boasted a $40 billion stock portfolio at the end of December, according to Securities and Exchange Commission filings. The fund — which is more than 50 years old — held $6 billion worth of shares in just five companies: Microsoft, Apple, Google-parent Alphabet, Amazon, and Intel.

  • Tennessee prisoner to face electric chair for killing inmate
    Yahoo News Video

    Tennessee prisoner to face electric chair for killing inmate

    A Tennessee inmate is scheduled Thursday to become the fifth to die in the state's electric chair in the past 16 months. Each of those inmates chose electrocution over the state's preferred execution method — lethal injection.

  • 26 of the Best Stainless-Steel Bathroom Faucets 
    Architectural Digest

    26 of the Best Stainless-Steel Bathroom Faucets 

    Take a shine to these faucets Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • Death row inmate scheduled to die by electric chair loses last attempt at life in prison
    The Independent

    Death row inmate scheduled to die by electric chair loses last attempt at life in prison

    The Tennessee governor has denied clemency to a murderer on death row following a last-ditch effort to get him life in prison made by multiple people, including a former guard who says the man saved his life. Nicholas Sutton, 58, is scheduled to die by electric chair on Thursday evening for the 1985 murder of inmate Carl Estep. His attorneys filed an appeal for clemency on 14 January, and it included multiple people advocating for removing Mr Sutton from death row.

  • Trump Stews Over McCabe But Is Wary of Driving Barr to Resign
    Bloomberg

    Trump Stews Over McCabe But Is Wary of Driving Barr to Resign

    Donald Trump was surprised and angered by the Justice Department's decision not to charge Andrew McCabe with crimes, but the president is wary of acting against the former deputy FBI director out of concern he might push Attorney General William Barr to resign, according to people familiar with the matter. The Justice Department gave the White House no advance notice of its decision on McCabe, meaning Trump found out along with the public when it was announced on Tuesday, three of the people said. That created fresh point of potential tension between Trump and Barr, who has publicly criticized Trump's tweets about criminal cases DOJ is pursuing and has privately told associates he may quit.

  • Mike Bloomberg’s Monumental Failure to Prepare
    Politico

    Mike Bloomberg’s Monumental Failure to Prepare

    If you know you're going to be called on the carpet for your dismissive comments about women, and charges of mistreatment of women in your company, do you really argue that the women signed nondiscrimination agreements “consensually,” and then brush aside Elizabeth Warren's demand that he release women from those agreements? Do you dismiss years of offensive comments by referring to “a joke I told”? Do you offer an anodyne apology for stop-and-frisk policing, then let your opponents detail the suffering that policy inflicted on countless black and brown young men, and let your foes remind you of how persistently you embraced that policy?