Kyler Murray unfollowing Arizona Cardinals triggers speculation about contract, salary

Is Kyler Murray unhappy about his contract situation with the Arizona Cardinals?

Some believe that his unfollowing the team on Instagram and Twitter and scrubbing his Instagram account of Cardinals photos is in relation to his contract status with the team.

Murray is currently eligible for a contract extension, but is under contract with the Cardinals for one more season.

Arizona can also keep Murray under contract through 2023 by exercising a fifth-year option that will pay him $25 million.

The 10 highest paid quarterbacks in the NFL all made $30 million or more last season.

Murray made $8.8 million and is set to make almost $11.4 million in 2022.

More: Is Kyler Murray trying to send a message to Arizona Cardinals with social media changes?

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Pro Football Talk's Mike Florio speculated that Murray's social media changes could deal with displeasure over his contract.

He wrote: "While it’s possible that the two sides have reached an impasse in talks on a second deal, it’s also possible that the team is trying to kick the can for another year, like the Ravens did with Lamar Jackson and the Browns have done with Baker Mayfield. Maybe Murray wants his reward now, not in a year. Regardless, Monday’s move was no accident. In the event that it was, or that it’s simply being misinterpreted, enough of a stink has been made to prompt Murray to put the toothpaste back in the tube, if he didn’t intended his gesture to create real questions about whether he’s truly committed to his current team. As it stands, those questions are hovering. They’ll stay there until Murray clarifies his intentions and desires."

More: NFL's highest paid quarterbacks: Patrick Mahomes, Josh Allen, Dak Prescott lead list

Is Kyler Murray unhappy with his contract situation with the Arizona Cardinals?
Is Kyler Murray unhappy with his contract situation with the Arizona Cardinals?

Cards Wire's Jess Root wrote that it doesn't make sense for the Cardinals to extend Murray right now.

He wrote: "However, from the team’s side, 2022 gives them one final year of a low cap hit where they can add talent around him and try to go for a title before his contract numbers balloon. They arguably would be at a competitive disadvantage to extend him now. Plus, the Cardinals already have salary cap issues. They are currently projected to begin the offseason over the cap by more than $800,000. On the other hand, if Murray improves even more, ends the season strong and the Cardinals make a run through the playoffs, the price tag could increase the per-year average from $5-$10 million."

More: Kyler Murray unfollows Cardinals on social media, scrubs them from his Instagram account

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Many speculated on social media that Murray's social media actions were to try to help get a new contract with the Cardinals.

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Cards Wire's Jess Root contributed to this story.

More: Arizona Cardinals' Kyler Murray deserves less blame for playoff loss to Los Angeles Rams

Reach Jeremy Cluff at jeremy.cluff@arizonarepublic.com. Follow him on Twitter @Jeremy_Cluff.

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This article originally appeared on Arizona Republic: Kyler Murray unfollowing Arizona Cardinals causes contract speculation