The Latest: Condemned man waits to hear if he will be spared

1 / 5

Death Penalty Racism

Abu-Ali Abdur'Rahman, front left, enters the courtroom for a hearing Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019, in Nashville, Tenn. Abdur'Rahman, who was convicted of murder and is scheduled to be executed next April, claims that prosecutors' racially motivated dismissal of potential black jurors resulted in an unfair trial. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The Latest on a proposed deal to convert a condemned Tennessee prisoner's sentence from death to life in prison (all times local):

5:55 p.m.

A condemned Tennessee prisoner is waiting to hear whether he will be spared the death chamber after he claimed prosecutors illegally excluded African Americans from the jury pool.

Abu-Ali Abdur'Rahman (ah-BOO'-ah-LEE') (AHB'-dur-RAK'-mahn), who is black, faces an April 16 execution date for the 1986 murder of Patrick Daniels.

But Nashville's district attorney has agreed to convert Abdur'Rahman's sentence to life. The judge promised to decide Thursday whether to accept the agreement, but no decision was announced by the close of business.

Abdur'Rahman's claim relies on a 2016 U.S. Supreme Court decision in a Georgia case where prosecutors illegally excluded African Americans from a jury.

In general, the high court has been making it tougher for defense attorneys to overturn verdicts because of mistakes made at trial. But the court has made it easier when it comes to biased juries.

___

1:10 p.m.

A condemned Tennessee prisoner is waiting to hear whether he will be spared the death chamber after he claimed prosecutors illegally excluded African Americans from the jury pool.

Abu-Ali Abdur'Rahman (ah-BOO'-ah-LEE') (AHB'-dur-RAK'-mahn), who is black, faces an April 16 execution date for the 1986 murder of Patrick Daniels.

But Nashville's district attorney has agreed to convert Abdur'Rahman's sentence to life. The judge promised to decide on Thursday whether to accept the agreement.

Abdur'Rahman's claim relies on a 2016 U.S. Supreme Court decision in a Georgia case where prosecutors illegally excluded African Americans from a jury.

In general, the high court has been making it tougher for defense attorneys to overturn verdicts because of mistakes made at trial. But the court has made it easier when it comes to biased juries.