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Lawmakers agree on panel to probe Jan. 6 attack

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U.S. House members have reached a deal to push forward with a bipartisan, independent commission to investigate the Jan. 6 storming of U.S. Capitol.

In a statement, the Democratic chairman of the Homeland Security Committee Bennie Thompson and ranking Republican member John Katko said on Friday they would introduce legislation before the House as soon as next week to set up the investigative panel.

It will be modeled after the one used to probe the attacks of September 11th.

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi praised the agreement, calling January 6th (quote) "one of the darkest days in our history."

Like the Sept. 11 panel, this one would have five commissioners appointed by each party as well as the authority to issue subpoenas to carry out its investigation.

The lawmakers said its report and "recommendations to prevent future attacks" would be due by Dec. 31.

The agreement paves the way for the panel's creation after a partisan fight over the scope of the investigation - and as Republican committee members increasingly downplay the events of the day in an effort to defend former President Donald Trump and his supporters.

Both the House and the Senate would have to approve the bill, which would then go to President Joe Biden to sign into law.

Video Transcript

- US House members have reached a deal to push forward with a bipartisan, independent commission to investigate the January 6 storming of the US Capitol. In a statement, the Democratic Chairman of the Homeland Security Committee, Bennie Thompson, and ranking Republican member, John Katko, said on Friday they would introduce legislation before the House as soon as next week to set up the investigative panel. It will be modeled after the one used to probe the attacks of September 11.

US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi praised the agreement calling January 6, quote, "one of the darkest days in our history." Like the September 11 panel, this one would have five commissioners appointed by each party, as well as the authority to issue subpoenas to carry out its investigation. The lawmaker said its report and recommendations to prevent future attacks would be due by December 31. The agreement paves the way for the panel's creation after a partisan fight over the scope of the investigation, and as Republican committee members increasingly downplay the events of the day in an effort to defend former President Donald Trump and his supporters. Both the House and the Senate would have to approve the bill, which would then go to President Joe Biden to sign into law.