Learning Welsh in lockdown... around the world

The coronavirus pandemic has sparked a rise in people wanting to learn a new language. Many of them are trying to master Welsh, not just in the UK but around the globe.

Video Transcript

NICOLE GALLEGOS: [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH]

TOMAS MORAN: I'll give you an eight out of 10 for that.

- [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH] Trinidad.

[NON-ENGLISH SPEECH] Boulder, Colorado.

- [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH] Australia.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

NICOLE GALLEGOS: I heard that the Gallegos people are a combination of Spanish and Welsh people that came to the land many years ago. So Gallegos kind of has a little bit of Welsh in it. It would be super, super cool if I could go and study there after I finish studying here.

TOMAS MORAN: At The Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama in Cardiff, is it?

NICOLE GALLEGOS: Yes, that's right.

TOMAS MORAN: I wasn't quite good enough to get in there. So if you do, you'll have done very well.

NICOLE GALLEGOS: Thank you. I hope so.

JEN BAILEY: Some people live in Wales. And some of them like me come from across the world, no particular family connection, no reason whatsoever to learn Welsh. And that gave a tribe, and it gave a validation. It's not completely weird to learn Welsh.

RICHARD MORSE: [NON-ENGLISH SPEECH] We were surprised initially that anyone would be interested in wanting to learn online. I've been running online chat clubs all over the world. People from all over the world connecting. And I just put up the chat club. And it fills up within a few hours. And then I have to turn people away.