Letters to the Editor: 'Stop the count'? Who's really trying to steal the election?

·2 min read
Maricopa County Sheriff's Deputies stand at the door of the Maricopa County Recorder's Office as President Donald Trump supporters rally outside, Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2020, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Matt York)
Sheriff's deputies stand at the door of the Maricopa County Recorder's Office as supporters of President Trump rally in Phoenix on Nov. 4. (Associated Press)

To the editor: President Trump and his backers are pointing the finger and blaming the Democrats for trying to steal the election. ("Trump's fraud claim is the only nakedly corrupt thing about the election thus far. Count the votes," editorial, Nov. 4)

Yet, they are the ones screaming "stop the count" in Pennsylvania and filing lawsuits against multiple states. Three fingers are pointing back at them.

Who is trying to steal the election?

Sheryl Kinne, Van Nuys

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To the editor: There is nothing ambiguous about the legal definition of election day. It was established by the 28th Congress in 1845 as the "Tuesday next after the first Monday in the month of November." It did not say any day in November.

In those horse-and-buggy days, people allowed themselves enough time to arrive at a polling location that day, not a day or a week later.

Today, in bad weather, we allow enough time to meet airline schedules, doctor's appointments and the like. A postmarked letter won't change that fact.

Miss the time and you miss the flight. It's as simple as that.

Richard Stegemeier, Anaheim

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To the editor: Trump's declaration of victory well before the vote count is completed and certified is cinematic.

I am reminded of Humphrey Bogart's character in "The Caine Mutiny" — to paraphrase, "Who stole the strawberries?" while nervously fidgeting his fingers.

Similar? Yes it is.

Kim MacConnel, Encinitas

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To the editor: This is how a loser sounds when he's going down:

"The sun was in my eyes."

"My shoelaces were too tight."

"The dog ate my homework."

"Stop counting the ballots in Pennsylvania and Georgia."

"Keep counting the ballots in Arizona and Nevada."

How can Republicans possibly be expected to be taken seriously when even Trump has said that if everyone was able to vote, his party would lose?

Peter Maradudin, Seattle

This story originally appeared in Los Angeles Times.