Letters: I'll take my beliefs over your 'facts' and scientific surveys, studies

·3 min read

My beliefs over your facts

In response to the Aug. 14 editorial, "Unwelcome in Ohio," please don’t publish opinions and say they are “fact-based” and that you strive for neutrality.

More:Unwelcomed in Ohio. Leaders working to make state less attractive, not more | Our View

Results of a survey are not “facts.” You determined based on the results of the survey that abortion is favored by the young and educated, that is an interpretation, not a fact. It is missing a critical piece of information. What were the religious beliefs of those who responded to the survey? Most Catholics, and many other people of faith, regardless of age or level of education, are opposed to abortion because quite simply the fifth commandment says, “Thou shall not kill."

Some of us believe that in the case of rape, incest or a risk to the unborn child or the mother, there should be exceptions, but we don’t believe abortion is a “human right.” It should not be used as a form of birth control because someone has had irresponsible sex.

We believe it should be about the human right of that unborn child to live because he or she has no choice.

More:Why you should forget almost everything you see in surveys of Americans' views on abortion

The question that continues to be debated is at what point is it a “child.” Here are facts more compelling than a survey. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, in 38 states, 76%, have fetal homicide laws. So, if you murder a pregnant woman, it would be considered two counts of homicide or if a pregnant woman is hurt and the unborn child dies, it would be a homicide. In 29 of those 38 states, 58%, have fetal homicide laws that apply to the earliest stages of pregnancy.

If it is considered homicide if someone else kills a pregnant person, why is it not considered homicide if the mother decides to kill the unborn child?

Diana Lewis, Johnstown

Letters to the Editor
Letters to the Editor

We need to see the affidavits

In order for a search warrant to be approved, sworn statements (affidavits) must be provided to a judge or magistrate who then reviews them for probable cause. If probable cause is deemed, a search warrant is authorized and a search for criminal evidence is instigated.

"I personally approved the decision to seek a search warrant." Attorney General Merrick Garland says.
"I personally approved the decision to seek a search warrant." Attorney General Merrick Garland says.

More:Ohio Republicans criticize Mar-a-Lago search, Democrats blast 'political pressure' on FBI

The results of an executed search warrant can be challenged if the persons providing the affidavits are shown to have provided false information or if the judge/magistrate is shown to have misinterpreted the data. In either case, the evidence found would then be inadmissible in a court of law.

Regarding the Mar-A-Lago search: We do not know who provided the affidavits and if the affirmers swore to factual statements.

We do not know that the attorney general was truly neutral.

We do not know if he made a politically based decision. We can speculate, but that does no one any good. We can make knee-jerk sound bites, but that helps no one.

More:The search warrant for Trump's Mar-a-Lago home has been released. Here's what it says.

Until it is shown that the affirmers were dishonest or that the attorney general was unscrupulous, we cannot say that the search warrant was either valid or invalid.

I truly want to know. I truly need to know, but I don’t want to guess.

Mike Kindt, Ashville

How about painting occupied homes?

Really?

I read the Aug. 15 article, "Dilapidated homes get fresh, bold look," about the artist painting houses slated for demolition.

I am wondering how many houses these artists could have painted in Whitehall that are still lived in.

I understand that it is art, but 15 people for three days?

There has to be a better use of their time. I would donate to this cause if they would be willing to help people in need.

David Waller, Grove City

This article originally appeared on The Columbus Dispatch: Letters: My beliefs over your facts, We need to see the affidavits