LGBTQ community unites with black activists for Pride

BROADCAST AND DIGITAL RESTRICTIONS~**

Broadcasters: FOR USE OF CLIPS FROM NATIVE SON FORUM MUST COURTESY NATIVE SON AND NOT FOR LIBRARY USE. NO RESALES. / FOR USE OF J. AUGUST RICHARDS INSTAGRAM VIDEO MUST COURTESY @JAUGUSTRICHARDS AND NOT FOR LIBRARY USE. NO RESALES. Digital: FOR USE OF CLIPS FROM NATIVE SON FORUM MUST COURTESY NATIVE SON AND NOT FOR LIBRARY USE. NO RESALES. / FOR USE OF J. AUGUST RICHARDS INSTAGRAM VIDEO MUST COURTESY @JAUGUSTRICHARDS AND NOT FOR LIBRARY USE. NO RESALES.~**

This was New York City’s Pride parade last year.

And this is more like what it will look like this year – a forum on Zoom in which members of the LGBTQ community will team up with black activists for discussions about social justice.

Sarah Kate Ellis is the President and CEO of GLAAD.

“We're going to talk about, how do we change things? How can white people be better allies, LGBTQ people, white people, be better allies. What is the change that we need to get behind? How can we point people in our community to what change needs to happen? And so, I think there'll be more of a conversation around racial justice and how we can support it and how we can be there to move it forward."

Initiatives between African-American and LGBTQ communities are multiplying in the wake of global protests calling for racial equality.

Ellis sees this as the LGBTQ community returning to its roots, noting that Pride started as a riot led by two trans women of color at the Stonewall Inn in New York in 1969.

"Pride has always been intersectional and making sure that we're representing our community. Black trans people, people of color, people with disabilities. I think that we're in a moment, right? And we can step up even further, even more in this moment."

This forum – held earlier in the week - was organized by Emil Wilbekin, founder of the gay empowerment group Native Son. Some 100 black, gay executives and entrepreneurs participated.

“Black gay men are stepping up and leading. And I think it's our time to, to not just to lead, but to actually be in the light and to empower our own community as we empower the world."

J. August Richards, a gay black actor on the NBC series "Council of Dads," said he doesn't mind missing out on the usual celebrations because of the momentum from global demonstrations.

“I think that we're asking people to show up for us. We're asking for allies, you know? So, I think it's a beautiful thing. There is a large conversation to be had about queer and gay people of color. And, you know, we experience a different set of circumstances in which to either come out or live your life openly or different challenges. And so, I think it's amazing and I pray that it doesn't end here. I hope that there is a continued conversation and a continued inclusion and a continued invitation, that's what I hope for."