Jan. 6 live: Outtakes show Trump refusing to say 'the election is over' in video to rioters

Jan. 6 live: Outtakes show Trump refusing to say 'the election is over' in video to rioters
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  • Thursday's Jan. 6 hearing detailed Donald Trump's actions as his supporters stormed the Capitol.

  • The committee showed outtakes of Trump's video after the riot, in which he refused to say "the election is over."

  • The committee also displayed footage of Sen. Josh Hawley fleeing the Capitol during the riot

Trump's awkward Jan. 7 video outtakes reveal his behavior behind the scenes as he argued with Ivanka, slammed the podium, and fumbled over his words

 

A series of video clips shown by House January 6 committee gave shocking insight into former President Donald Trump's behavior behind the scenes.

The video from January 7 last year — around 24 hours after rioters swarmed the Capitol — was played during the January 6 panel's eighth public hearing on Thursday.

The panel was shown a take where Trump appeared to struggle with disavowing the violence during the riot, and another where he banged on the podium in frustration after failing to say the word "defiled."

In another take, Trump paused partway through his address and began debating the language with his daughter Ivanka. He refused to say four words suggested by aides: "The election is over."


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Video shows Jan. 6 hearing room burst into laughter when shown footage of Josh Hawley fleeing the Capitol riot

Josh Hawley on January 6
An image of Sen. Josh Hawley, a Missouri Republican, is shown during a January 6 committee hearingTasos Katopodis/Getty Images

A video shows attendees of Thursday's January 6 committee hearing erupting into laughter when they were shown footage of GOP Sen. Josh Hawley fleeing the Capitol during the insurrection.

Rep. Elaine Luria, a Democrat on the committee, said that hours before fleeing, Hawley was seen raising his fist "in solidarity" with the protesters, and that a Capitol Police officer told the panel that the gesture "riled up the crowd."

The committee then played never-seen-before footage of Hawley running across a hallway and down a flight of stairs as the Capitol riot was underway.

Footage from inside the January 6 hearing room on Thursday showed the audience bursting into laughter as the clip was played.

Michael Fanone, a former DC Police officer who was brutally beaten by January 6 rioters, said Hawley "ran like a coward" and called him a "clown."


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Sarah Matthews previously said Trump tweet about Pence was like 'pouring gasoline on the fire'

Sarah Matthews behind nameplate and microphone in commitee room
Sarah Matthews, former deputy White House press secretary, testifies before the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6 Attack on the US Capitol in the Cannon House Office Building on July 21, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty Images

Sarah Matthews, former deputy press secretary for the Trump White House, testified before the House Select Committee investigating the Capitol attack on Thursday night.

Matthews was the deputy press secretary in the final months of Donald Trump's presidency. She was one of several aides to resign on the day of the Capitol riot on January 6, 2021.

She said in February that Trump's tweet about Mike Pence not having "the courage" to overturn the election was like "pouring gasoline on the fire."

She elaborated on that sentiment during her testimony on Thursday night.

"I thought the tweet about the vice president was the last thing that was needed in that moment," Matthews told lawmakers.

"It was essentially him giving the green light to these people — telling them that what they were doing at the steps of the Capitol, and entering the Capitol, was okay, that they were justified in their anger," she added. "And he shouldn't have been doing that. He should have been telling these people to go home and to leave and to condemn the violence that we are seeing."


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New video shows Trump wouldn't say the 'election is over' as he practiced his speech on January 7, 2021

An unedited video of then-President Donald Trump recording an address to the nation on January 7, 2021, is displayed on a screen during a hearing by the House Select Committee to investigate the January 6th attack on the US Capitol.
An unedited video of then-President Donald Trump recording an address to the nation on January 7, 2021, is displayed on a screen during a hearing by the House Select Committee to investigate the January 6th attack on the US Capitol.Al Drago/Getty Images

A day after the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol, Trump condemned his riotous supporters, saying they did not represent "our movement" or the country.

But he refused to say four words his aides suggested: "The election is over."

For the first time Thursday, the House committee investigating the Capitol attack aired unedited footage of Trump recording his national address on January 7, 2021, in which he declared that rioters involved in the insurrection "broke the law" and "will pay."

It was a marked change in tone from the day of the attack, in which Trump recorded a video telling the angry mob: ""Go home. We love you, you're very special."


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The House GOP appears to have mistakenly tweeted 'this is heresy' in response to the latest January 6 hearing when it meant to say 'hearsay'


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Twitter is having a field day with the January 6 committee's juxtaposition of Josh Hawley raising his fist in solidarity with the protesters and fleeing hours later

The Jan. 6 committee showed the photo of Sen. Josh Hawley raising his fist in solidarity with protesters storming the Capitol.

Then they played a video of him running from the protesters he helped rile.

Twitter users had a field day with chicken, Forrest Gump and running gifs, some set to music.


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Rep. Adam Kinzinger says Kevin McCarthy was 'scared and begging for help' from Trump and his family members on January 6

Kevin McCarthy
House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA).Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

"Leader McCarthy, who was one of the president's strongest supporters, was scared and begging for help. President Trump turned him down, so he tried to call the president's children," Kinzinger, an Illinois Republican and member of the January 6 committee, said during Thursday's hearing.


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The House Republicans' official Twitter account attacked a January 6 witness who currently works for House Republicans

A deleted tweet from the official House Republican account
A deleted tweet sent by the official House Republicans' Twitter accountScreenshot/Twitter

"Just another liar and pawn in Pelosi's witch-hunt," the @HouseGOP account wrote in a now-deleted tweet that retweeted Sarah Matthews, who served as Trump's deputy press secretary.

She is testifying before the January 6 committee on Thursday and is now the communications director for Republicans on the House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis.


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Jared Kushner testified to the January 6 committee that he was taking a shower as his father-in-law's supporters stormed the Capitol

An image of Jared Kushner, Former White House Senior Advisor to former President Donald Trump is displayed on a screen during the third hearing held by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 16, 2022 in the Cannon House Office Building in Washington, DC.
An image of Jared Kushner shown during a hearing for the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol.Tom Brenner-Pool/Getty Images

"So I heard my phone ringing, turned the shower off, saw it was Leader McCarthy, who I had a good relationship with," Kushner said in video testimony the committee played on Thursday.

"He told me it was getting really ugly over at the Capitol, and said please, anything you could do to help, I would appreciate it."


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Trump was 'pouring gasoline on the fire' with Pence tweet, making January 6 'much worse,' former aide Sarah Matthews testifies

Sarah Matthews behind nameplate and microphone in commitee room
Sarah Matthews, former deputy White House press secretary, testifies before the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6 Attack on the US Capitol in the Cannon House Office Building on July 21, 2022 in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty Images

Then-President Donald Trump disregarded pleas from his own staff calling for him to seek an end to the January 6, 2021, violence and instead he sent a tweet attacking his own vice president that was akin to "pouring gasoline on the fire and making it much worse," a former aide testified Thursday.

"Mike Pence didn't have the courage to do what should have been done to protect our Country and our Constitution," Trump tweeted at 2:24 p.m. on January 6, 2021.

"I thought the tweet about the vice president was the last thing that was needed in that moment," Sarah Matthews, a former White House deputy press secretary, told the January 6 committee on Thursday.


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January 6 committee played video of Sen. Josh Hawley sprinting from the Capitol just hours after his famous fist-raised photo

Josh Hawley on January 6
An image of Sen. Josh Hawley, a Missouri Republican, is shown during a January 6 committee hearing on Thursday, July 21, 2022.Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Republican Sen. Josh Hawley fled during the attack on the Capitol just like the rest of his colleagues, the House January 6 committee pointed out in a juxtaposition between thefamous photo of the Missouri Republican raising his fist to protesters compared to a new security camera video showing him sprinting to safety.

The panel played previously undisclosed Capitol security footage showing Hawley, circled in case viewers didn't recognize him, running away. There was audible laughter in the hearing room as the footage was played.


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Members of Pence's security detail feared for their lives and were calling loved ones to say goodbye as violence escalated at the Capitol

January 6 hearing
House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol hold a prime-time hearing in the Cannon House Office Building on July 21, 2022.Win McNamee/Getty Images

Members of then-Vice President Mike Pence's security detail were calling their loved ones to "say goodbye" as violence escalated at the Capitol on January 6, 2021, a former White House security official told the January 6 committee in testimony played on Thursday evening.

"The members of the VP detail at this time were starting to fear for their own lives. There was a lot of yelling, a lot of very personal calls over the radio, so it was disturbing. I don't like talking about it," the official, who was unnamed for security purposes, told the committee.


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Trump's official White House photographer was told 'no photographs' as the Capitol came under siege

Trump overcoat oval office
The House January 6 committee displayed a photograph of Trump in the Oval Office shortly after the "Stop the Steal" rally.Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

On January 6, 2021, then-President Donald Trump's official White House photographer wanted to do her job. As a mob of Trump supporters stormed the Capitol, the photographer wanted to document the sitting president because, as she put it, it was "very important" for history.

But the instruction to the official White House photographer, Shealah Craighead, was clear: "No photographs."

For the famously ratings-conscious Trump, it was a rare moment of eschewing a camera lens.


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Former White House security official says that if Trump walked to the Capitol on January 6 it would have become 'an insurrection, a coup'

January 6 committee hearing
Audio of a former Trump security official's testimony is played during a House January 6 committee hearing.Alex Brandon-Pool/Getty Images

A former Trump White House security official said that there were fears that if President Donald Trump marched to the Capitol on January 6 that a "coup" could be underway.

"To be completely honest, we were all in a state of shock," an unnamed security aide testified before the House January 6 committee. "I think the actual physical feasibility of doing it, and then also, we knew what that implicated and what that meant, that this was no longer a rally, that this was going to move to something else if he physically walked to the Capitol."

Crucially, the security official's testimony appears to confirm what former Trump aide Cassidy Hutchinson previously told the panel.


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The US's top general said he was puzzled Trump didn't call on the military to help respond to the January 6 attack

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley.
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley.Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mark Milley expressed puzzlement over Trump's inaction on January 6, 2021.

"Nothing? No call? nothing? Zero?" he told members of the House January 6 committee.

The committee played a video of his testimony during its Thursday hearing.


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A timeline of what Trump was doing as his MAGA mob attacked the US Capitol

An image of President Donald Trump appears on video screens before his speech to supporters from the Ellipse at the White House
An image of former President Donald Trump appears on video screens before his speech to supporters from the Ellipse at the White House.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

The January 6 Committee's eighth primetime hearing on Thursday zeroed in on Trump's actions — and refusal to act — during the 187 minutes that his supporters violently breached the US Capitol before he recorded a video urging them to "go home."

White House phone records provide a detailed accounting of Trump's many phone calls to aides, lawyers, and members of Congress before and after the riots.

But the phone records contain a nearly seven-hour gap between 11:17 a.m. and 6:54 p.m., a crucial period of time during which Trump spoke at a rally urging attendees to protest the certification of electoral votes, pressured Vice President Mike Pence, and watched the siege on the Capitol unfold on Fox News from his private dining room off the Oval Office, according to aides.

This timeline outlines what we do know about Trump's actions as the riot unfolded:


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Jan. 6 panel has summertime plans

Rep. Liz Cheney speaks during a January 6 committee hearing
Jan. 6 Committee vice-chair Liz CheneySaul Loeb/AFP

The January 6 Committee leaders kicked off Thursday's hearing by outlining their plans for more summertime work as their panel continues its investigation of the 2021 insurrection at the Capitol.

Rep. Bennie Thompson, the panel's chairman, said via video that there'd be more hearings in September. A few moments later, Rep. Liz Cheney, said the panel plans to spend the August recess "pursuing emerging information on multiple fronts" before turning to additional hearings.

"The damn has begun to break," Cheney said.

 

 

Latest hearing will focus on Trump's reaction to the Capitol riot — and his alleged inaction to stop it.

Donald Trump
Former President Donald Trump gives the keynote address at the Faith and Freedom Coalition during their annual conference on June 17, 2022, in Nashville, Tennessee.Seth Herald/Getty Images

The House panel investigating the Capitol riot on January 6, 2021 will hold its eighth hearing on Thursday night.

The hearing — scheduled to start at 8 p.m. ET — will focus on Trump's actions during the deadly insurrection at the Capitol building.

Committee members have argued that Trump knew of the violence and refused to take actions to prevent or stop it, despite the pleas from advisors in his inner circle.

Former national security adviser Matthew Pottinger and Sarah Matthews, former deputy press secretary in the Trump administration, are expected to testify.

The committee is expected to add to the public's understanding of the critical 187 minutes between when Trump stirred up a crowd of his supporters at the Ellipse to when he posted a video to Twitter asking them to "go home."


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Rep. Kinzinger says Trump acted like an angry child during January 6 attack

Republican Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois during a hearing on Capitol Hill on March 10, 2021.
Republican Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois during a hearing on Capitol Hill on March 10, 2021.Ting Shen-Pool/Getty Images

GOP Rep. Adam Kinzinger, who is expected to play a leading role in Thursday's primetime hearing, will focus on Trump's mindset and actions as he watched his supporters assault law enforcement and desecrate the Capitol.

In an interview with The Bulwark, Kinzinger said Trump "was someone who knew exactly what he was doing."


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Trump spent most of the January 6 attack watching TV in the White House dining room: new video

Trump
Former President Donald Trump speaks during a "Save America" rally in Anchorage, Alaska, on July 9, 2022.Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Trump spent the bulk of his time during the Capitol attack watching reports of the insurrection on TV, according to video testimony given to the January 6 House panel.

Ahead of Thursday night's hearing on how Trump reacted to the storming of the Capitol, Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., a member of the House Select Committee, shared a video compilation of the depositions on Twitter.


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Secret Service may have violated federal law by deleting messages around January 6

The leaders of the January 6 hearings say the Secret Service may have violated federal law by undergoing a process that led to text messages from the time of the Capitol riot to be deleted.

"The procedure for preserving content prior to this purge appears to have been contrary to federal records retention requirements and may represent a possible violation of the Federal Records Act," a letter from Reps. Bennie Thompson and Liz Cheney said.

So far, the committee had received one text message from the agency.

Jan. 6 hearings are 'undoubtedly starting to take a toll' on Trump's popularity, former ambassador says

Former White House counsel Pat Cipollone appears on a video display above the House January 6 committee.
Former White House counsel Pat Cipollone is seen on a video display during the seventh hearing held by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on July 12, 2022.Sarah Silbiger-Pool/Getty Images

A former ambassador who served during the Trump administration says the former president's popularity is taking a hit as more revelations about Trump's actions before and during the Capitol riot come out.

Attorney Randy Evans, who was ambassador to Luxembourg, said the hearings' "steadiness, the repetitiveness, has had a corrosive effect."

Evans added it's "all undoubtedly starting to take a toll — how much, I don't know. But the bigger question is whether it starts to eat through the Teflon. There are some signs that maybe it has. But it's too early to say right now."


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Secret Service has only submitted 1 text to the Jan. 6 committee: panel member

The House panel investigating the Capitol riot has received just one text message from the Secret Service in response to a subpoena, Rep. Zoe Lofgren said.

"In their letter they gave no indication that they have secured the phones in question and done some forensic work with them. That's something we want to know," Lofgren told MSNBC on Tuesday.

"Obviously, this doesn't look good ... Coincidences can happen but we really need to get to the bottom of this and get a lot more information than we have currently."


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Jan. 6 panel subpoenas Secret Service for text messages as DHS watchdog accuses agents of deleting them after being asked

A US Secret Service agent takes position outside the White House
A US Secret Service agent takes position outside the White House in November 2020.J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo

The House committee investigating the Capitol riot has issued a subpoena to the US Secret Service after the Department of Homeland Security inspector general accused the agency of deleting text messages after being asked.

Rep. Bennie Thompson, the committee's chairperson, said in a Friday letter to Secret Service director James Murray that the panel was seeking text messages from January 5 and 6, 2021.

Thompson mentioned three previous requests for information, sent in January, March, and August of last year, pertaining to all communications between DHS officials and then-President Donald Trump about the Capitol riot.


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The Jan. 6 witness Trump tried to call is a White House support staffer, reports say

The Jan. 6 committee witness whom former President Donald Trump is alleged to have tried to contact is a White House support staffer, reports say.

At Tuesday's hearing, committee member Rep. Liz Cheney claimed that Trump sought to contact a witness who had not appeared publically, in what she characterized as a form of witness tampering.

CNN first reported, citing two sources, that Trump made the call to the witness after the June 28 testimony by another witness, the former White House staffer Cassidy Hutchinson.

According to the report, the support staffer was in a position to corroborate parts of Hutchinson's testimony, and had been providing evidence to the committee.

NBC News later said it had confirmed CNN's reporting. Neither outlet named the person.


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Watergate star witness predicts criminal charges after latest Jan. 6 testimony: 'Trump is in trouble'

John Dean
Former White House Counsel John Dean testifying on Capitol Hill on June 10, 2019.SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

John Dean, a key witness in the Watergate investigation, said that former President Donald Trump and others will likely face legal repercussions from evidence presented at Tuesday's January 6 committee hearing.

In an interview with CNN, Dean highlighted testimony by former members of extremist group the Oath Keepers, who were part of the mob that stormed the Capitol.

Dean described them as "really classic authoritarian followers, following the leader."

He argued that the testimony proves the extent to which the rioters believed they had been sent by Trump, which he said could be used by prosecutors were they to bring charges against the former president.


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Trump 'liked the crazies' and wanted Alex Jones and Ali Alexander as Jan. 6 rally speakers despite red flags raised, former spokesperson says

Katrina Pierson, a former campaign spokesperson for Donald Trump and one of the organizers of the January 6 "Stop the Steal" rally, said Trump wanted Alex Jones and Ali Alexander to speak at the event despite the "red flags" they raised.

On Tuesday, Rep. Stephanie Murphy, a member of the House select committee investigating the Capitol riot, played a video of Pierson's testimony to the panel in which Pierson commented on Trump's love for "crazies" like Jones and Alexander.

"Yes, I was talking about President Trump. He loved people who viciously defended him in public," Pierson said in her deposition.


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Photo shows Mark Meadows escorting Rudy Giuliani from the White House following 'UNHINGED' West Wing meeting about 2020 election results

A photo that Cassidy Hutchinson took of Mark Meadows leading Rudy Giuliani away from the Oval Office.
A photo that Cassidy Hutchinson took of Mark Meadows leading Rudy Giuliani away from the Oval Office.Courtesy of CSPAN

Former Trump White House chief of staff Mark Meadows had to escort former Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani from the Oval Office following a chaotic, late-night December 2020 West Wing meeting about the election results, according to new January 6 testimony.

Cassidy Hutchinson, the former Trump White House aide whose explosive testimony stunned Washington last month, shared with the House Select Committee investigating the Capitol riot a photo she took of Meadows leading  Giuliani away from the Oval Office following the turbulent gathering, which was the site of a face-off between Trump's legal allies and White House lawyers over efforts to promote the then-president's baseless claims of election fraud, according to testimony.

The January 6 panel shared the photo alongside real-time text messages Hutchinson was sending from the meeting during its seventh live hearing on Tuesday.

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Former Twitter employee feared people were going to die on January 6

A former Twitter employee told the House committee investigating the attack on the US Capitol that activity on the platform raised concerns that there would be deadly violence in Washington on January 6.

The former employee, whose voice was obscured in a recording played during Tuesday's hearing, testified about trying and failing to get the company to intervene as former President Donald Trump's extremist supporters used the platform to repeat his statements about the upcoming protests to the 2020 election results.

On the night of January 5, the employee testified about slacking a colleague, a message to the effect of, "When people are shooting each other tomorrow, I will try and rest in the knowledge that we tried."

The former employee was on a team responsible for platform and content moderation policies during 2020 and 2021.

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Oath Keepers attorney used the 'Queer Eye' loft kitchen from Season 3 as her video background before the January 6 committee

Oath Keepers attorney Kellye SoRelle
Oath Keepers attorney Kellye SoRelle.C-SPAN

Testifying remotely before the House Select Committee investigating the January 6 insurrection, the Oath Keepers' attorney and acting president used a green screen background from the Netflix show "Queer Eye."

Erin Ryan, host of Crooked Media's "Hysteria" podcast, tweeted out a screenshot of the remote deposition from Oath Keepers acting president Kellye SoRelle alongside an image from the third season of the streaming series, which Ryan said she found from a reverse Google image search.

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Rep. Liz Cheney ends hearing with bombshell: Donald Trump called a witness in the House January 6 investigation

Former President Donald Trump called a witness in the congressional inquiry into the January 6, 2021 attack on the Capitol, Rep. Liz Cheney said Tuesday, prompting House investigators to notify the Justice Department.

"After our last hearing, President Trump tried to call a witness in our investigation. A witness you have not yet seen in these hearings. That person declined to answer or respond to President Trump's call and, instead, alerted their lawyer to the call," said Cheney, a Wyoming Republican, in a bombshell revelation that concluded the House January 6 committee's seventh public hearing.

"Their lawyer alerted us, and this committee has supplied that information to the Department of Justice," she added. "Let me say one more time: We will take any effort to influence witness testimony very seriously."

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The January 6 investigators obtained a video of Roger Stone reciting the Proud Boys' 'Fraternity Creed,' the first step for initiation to the extremist group

An image of Roger Stone projected on a video screen above the January 6 committee.
An image of Roger Stone is shown on a screen as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, July 12, 2022.Doug Mills/Pool via AP

New details emerged at Tuesday's January 6 committee hearing on the close ties between Roger Stone and extremist groups, including that the longtime Donald Trump confidante was recorded reciting the Proud Boys' so-called "Fraternity Creed."

Rep. Jamie Raskin, who co-chaired the public hearing, described reciting the creed as "the first level of initiation" into the far-right group, five members of which are scheduled to be tried on seditious conspiracy charges in December.

"Stone's ties to the Proud Boys go back many years," Raskin said. "He's even taken their so-called "Fraternity Creed," required for the first level of initiation to the group."

Video then played showing Stone in a crowded outdoor setting, saying, "Hi, I'm Roger Stone. I'm a Western chauvinist, and I refuse to apologize for the creation of the modern world."

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Trump planned to call on his supporters to march to the Capitol on January 6, according to a draft tweet

The House committee investigating the Capitol riot on Tuesday revealed a draft tweet in which President Donald Trump called on his supporters to go to the US Capitol after his speech on January 6, 2021.

"I will be making a Big Speech at 10AM on January 6th at the Ellipse (South of the White House). Please arrive early, massive crowds expected. March to the Capitol after. Stop the Steal!!" Trump wrote in the draft tweet, which is undated.

Trump never sent the tweet, but its existence, along with other messages exchanged between rally organizers, offer proof that the march to the Capitol was premeditated, the January 6 committee said.

Democratic Rep. Stephanie Murphy of Florida presented the evidence during Tuesday's hearing, and said: "The evidence confirms that this was not a spontaneous call to action, but rather it was a deliberate strategy decided upon in advance by the president."

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Trump's ex-campaign manger Brad Parscale said in private texts that Trump is to blame for Capitol rioter's death

In a series of texts revealed at the 7th hearing of the House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection, President Donald Trump's former campaign manger Brad Parscale suggested in a message to former Trump campaign spokeswoman Katrina Pierson that Trump's words led to the death of a capitol rioter.

Messages show Pierson tried to push back, writing that "it wasn't the rhetoric."

"Katrina," Parscale wrote back. "Yes it was."


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Pat Cipollone suggested Pence should get the Presidential Medal of Freedom for refusing to block the Electoral Collage count certification

A video of Pat Cipollone, former White House counsel, is shown as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, July 12, 2022.
A video of Pat Cipollone, former White House counsel, is shown as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, July 12, 2022.Doug Mills/Pool via AP

"I think the vice president did the right thing, I think he did the courageous thing," Cipollone said in testimony revealed at the House January 6 committee's seventh public hearing on Tuesday. "I have a great deal of respect for Vice President Pence."

Cipollone added that he didn't think Pence had any "legal authority" to do anything other than refuse to give into President Donald Trump's pressure campaign and interfere with the Electoral College certification on January 6, 2021.


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11 House Republicans met with Trump to strategize overturning the election results on January 6, and 5 of them later asked for pardons

According to Democratic Rep. Stephanie Murphy of Florida, a member of the January 6 committee, several Republicans met at the White House on December 21, 2020, as part of an effort to "disseminate his false claims and to encourage members of the public to fight the outcome on January 6."

Vice President Mike Pence, White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, and Rudy Giuliani were all at the meeting, along with President Donald Trump.

According to White House visitor logs, Rep. Brian Babin of Texas, Rep. Andy Biggs of Arizona, Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida, Rep. Louie Gohmert of Texas, Rep. Paul Gosar of Florida, Rep. Andy Harris of Maryland, Rep. Jody Hice of Georgia, Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio, Rep. Scott Perry of Pennsylvania, and Rep-elect Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia all attended the meeting.


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Former Twitter employee tells January 6 committee that Trump received special treatment from Twitter

Trump tweet displayed on screen behind January 6 committee
An evidence tweet is shown on a screen during a full committee hearing on "the January 6th Investigation," on Capitol Hill on July 12, 2022, in Washington, DC. - The House committee probing the 2021 assault on the US Capitol is examining connections between associates of former US President Donald Trump and far right-wing extremist groups at its seventh hearing on Tuesday.SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

"I believe that Twitter relished in the knowledge that they were also the favorite and most used service of the former president and enjoyed having that sort of power within the social media ecosystem," the former Twitter employee told investigators in testimony aired in Tuesday's hearing of the congressional committee investigating January 6.

The employee, whose identity was kept secret, was introduced by Rep. Jamie Raskin as having worked on Twitter's content moderation team from 2020 to 2021.


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Cassidy Hutchinson texted a fellow White House aide 'the west wing is UNHINGED' as Oval Office meeting almost devolved into a brawl

Cassidy Hutchinson
Cassidy Hutchinson, a top former aide to Trump White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, testifies during the sixth hearing by the House Select Committee on the January 6th insurrection in the Cannon House Office Building on June 28, 2022 in Washington, DC.Andrew Harnik-Pool/Getty Images

According to messages released by the House January 6 committee, Hutchinson texted the message to another top aide, Anthony Ornato.

It was sent amid the scene of a December 2020 Oval Office meeting as Trump attorney Sidney Powell and White House lawyers clashed over efforts to push Trump's debunked election fraud claims.


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Former White House counsel Pat Cipollone 'set a new land speed record' trying to break up a meeting between Trump, Michael Flynn, and Overstock's CEO, Sidney Powell said

Democratic Rep. Jamie Raskin of Maryland, one of the committee members leading Tuesday's January 6 hearing, said former President Donald Trump, election lawyer Sidney Powell, former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn, and Patrick Byrne, the CEO of Overstock.com, had met to discuss an ongoing effort to reverse the results of the 2020 election.

Powell told investigators in previously recorded testimony, however, that the group had "probably no more than 10 or 15 minutes" with Trump before Pat Cipollone, then the White House Counsel, intercepted the meeting.

"I bet Pat Cipollone set a new land speed record," Powell quipped.

Rep. Jamie Raskin says the 'oldest domestic enemy' of US democracy' is 'whipping up mob violence to destroy fair elections'

Vice Chair Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., left, listens as Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., speaks as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, July 12, 2022.
Vice Chair Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., left, listens as Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., speaks as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, July 12, 2022.AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

"The problem of politicians whipping up mob violence to destroy fair elections is the oldest domestic enemy of constitutional democracy in America," Raskin said in his opening statement during Tuesday's January 6 hearing.

He mentioned a time during Abraham Lincoln's presidency, when an 1837 racist mob in Alton, Illinois, during which rioters broke into an abolitionist newspaper's office and murdered the paper's editor, Elijah Lovejoy.

"If racist mobs are encouraged by politicians to rampage and terrorize, Lincoln said, they will violate the rights of other citizens and quickly destroy the bonds of social trust necessary for democracy to work," Raskin said.


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Convicted Capitol rioter testifying in front of the committee warned that a 'Civil War will ensue' if Trump got robbed in 2020

Stephen Ayres, who pleaded guilty last month to disorderly conduct in connection to the January 6, 2021, Capitol riot, is set to testify in from to the House committee investigating the January 6 attack.

His testimony is expected to underscore how Trump summoned supporters to Washington DC on the day Congress was scheduled to certify the results of the 2020 presidential election.

On December 26, 2020, Ayres posted to Twitter: "If the [deep state] robs president Trump!!! Civil War will ensue!"

It was posted days after Trump called for a "big protest" in his own tweet.


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Ex-White House counsel Pat Cipollone was against Trump naming Sidney Powell special counsel

A video of former White House counsel Pat Cipollone is shown as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, July 12, 2022.
A video of former White House counsel Pat Cipollone is shown as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, July 12, 2022.AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

In previously unseen footage from his deposition to the House Select Committee last Friday, Cipollone spoke about Powell being Trump's pick to be special counsel for the Department of Justice to investigate repeatedly disproven wide spread voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election.

"I was vehemently opposed," Cipollone said when asked about Powell being made special counsel. "I didn't think she should've been appointed to anything."


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Rep. Jamie Raskin says Trump 'electrified and galvanized' his extremist supporters with a tweet calling for a 'big protest'

Jamie Raskin listens as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, July 12, 2022.
Jamie Raskin listens as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, July 12, 2022.AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Raskin, a Maryland Democrat, referenced a December 19, 2020, tweet from Trump during the House's January 6 committee hearing on Tuesday.

"Big protest in D.C. on January 6th," Trump's tweet said. "Be there, will be wild!"

Raskin said that Trump's tweet spurred on "the dangerous extremists in the Oathkeepers, the Proud Boys and other racist and white nationalist groups spoiling for a fight against the government."

"Here were thousands of enraged Trump followers, thoroughly convinced by the Big Lie who traveled from across the country to join Trump's wild rally to 'stop the steal,'" he added. "With the proper incitement by political leaders, and the proper instigation from the extremists, many members of this crowd could be led to storm the Capitol, confront the vice president in Congress and try to overturn the 2020 election results."


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Ivanka Trump told the House January 6 committee that she believed her father lost re-election 'probably prior' to a formal Electoral Collage vote in December 2020

Ivanka Trump
Ivanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Ivanka Trump told the House January 6 committee that she believed her father lost the 2020 presidential election likely before a formal Electoral College vote on December 14, 2020.

"Was that an important day for you? Did that affect your planning or your realization as to whether or not there was going to be an end to this administration?" an attorney for the committee asked Ivanka Trump in video taped testimony.

"I think it was my sentiment, probably prior as well," Ivanka Trump said in response.


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Pat Cipollone's testimony 'met our expectations," Cheney says

WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 29 : White House Counsel Pat Cipollone arrives before President Donald J. Trump participates in a signing ceremony for H.R. 1327, an act to permanently authorize the September 11th victim compensation fund, in the Rose Garden at the White House on Monday, July 29, 2019 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Former White House Counsel Pat Cipollone.Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

January 6 committee vice chair and Republican Rep. Liz Cheney said former White House Counsel Pat Cipollone testified before the panel — and that his testimony "met our expectations."

The House committee then aired several clips of Cipollone's sworn testimony at the start of their seventh hearing on Tuesday.

Cipollone told the January 6 committee that he agreed Trump should concede the 2020 election and that he lost to Democratic nominee Joe Biden fair and square.

 

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Cheney: Trump is 'not an impressionable child'

Liz Cheney
GOP Rep. Liz CheneyAP Photo/ Andrew Harnik)

GOP Rep. Liz Cheney pushed back on excuses for former President Donald Trump's actions during the Capitol riot, saying he was not simply misled about his election lies but knew they were false.

"President Trump is a 76-year-old man," Cheney said as the January 6 committee began its hearing on Tuesday. "He is not an impressionable child. Just like everyone else in our country, he is responsible for his own actions and his own choices."

Cheney said evidence shows Trump was warned "over and over" that there was no sign of widespread election fraud.

"No rational or sane man in his position could disregard that information and reach the opposite conclusion," she said, "and Donald Trump cannot escape responsibility by being willfully blind."


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Jan. 6 committee's next hearing expected to link Trump even more closely to the Capitol attack

House Jan 6 panel
Lawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

From its very first hearing, the House committee investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol made a point of connecting former President Donald Trump to the violence of that day.

A month later, the House panel is poised to delve even deeper. At its next public hearing, set for 1 p.m. ET Tuesday, the committee is expected to focus on how the violent pro-Trump mob coalesced on January 6 and the involvement of far-right groups, including the Proud Boys and the Oath Keepers.

Committee aides said Monday during a background call with reporters that the panel's seventh hearing would underscore how a single tweet from Trump mobilized his supporters, proving a "pivotal moment that spurred a chain of events, including pre-planning by Proud Boys."

"Big protest in D.C. on January 6th," Trump tweeted on December 19, 2020. "Be there, will be wild!"

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Cassidy Hutchinson's testimony jolted the DOJ into focusing on Trump in its Jan 6 investigation, report says

Cassidy Hutchinson
Cassidy Hutchinson testifying before the Jan. 6 committee on June 28, 2022.Jacquelyn Martin/AP Photo

Testimony by Jan. 6 witness Cassidy Hutchinson sparked debate among top Justice Department officials about Donald Trump's potential criminal culpability for the Capitol riot, The New York Times reported. 

The June 28 testimony by the former White House aide prompted officials to discuss Trump's actions on January 6, 2021, and questions about potential legal ramifications for the former president, sources told The Times.

Present at some of the discussions were Attorney General Merrick Garland, and Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco, the report said.


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Cassidy Hutchinson and Rep. Liz Cheney have forged an 'unlikely bond' amid January 6 testimony process, per report

Cassidy Hutchinson, the former Trump White House aide whose explosive January 6 testimony stunned Washington last month, has found a friend and ally in Rep. Liz Cheney, the Wyoming Republican who has been ostracized from the GOP for criticizing the former president and serving as vice-chair on the House Select Committee investigating the January 6 Capitol riot, according to The New York Times.

The two Republican women — both on the outs with the party's overwhelming Trump faction — have developed an unlikely bond in recent weeks as the January 6 panel riot zeroes in on increasingly damning testimony against former President Donald Trump.

The congresswomen admires Hutchinson's dedication to country over personal power, according to The Times.

"I have been incredibly moved by young women that I have met and that have come forward to testify in the Jan. 6 committee," Cheney said in a recent speech at the Reagan Library.


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A bad day for Steve Bannon

Steve Bannon court sign
Steve Bannon asked to delay his mid-July trial by at least three months.Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Monday was not a good day in court for Steve Bannon.

The former Trump aide lost on several key pre-trial motions ahead of his upcoming July 18 federal trial on contempt of Congress charges.

U.S. District Court Judge Carl Nichols, a Trump appointee, ruled from the bench that Bannon's defense attorneys couldn't use several of their planned arguments. Nichols also denied Bannon's bid to have the trial date delayed.

Insider's Ryan Barber was at the courthouse in Washington, DC, and has more in his dispatch linked below.


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'That mob on the Mall'

An Oath Keeper from Idaho in Bozeman, Montana.
An Oath Keeper from Idaho in Bozeman, Montana.William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images

We've got a handy preview for you on Tuesday's next big House January 6 hearing, which will focus on the right-wing extremist groups that in the words of Rep. Adam Schiff helped lead "that mob on the Mall."

Laura Italiano breaks down the five potential bombshells she'll be looking out for when the panel convenes at 1 pm. Check out what those are here:


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The most shocking revelations from the January 6 committee's first hearings on the Capitol attack

Cassidy Hutchinson
Cassidy Hutchinson, former aide to Trump White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, testifies as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol continues to reveal its findings of a year-long investigation, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, June 28, 2022.Jacquelyn Martin/AP Photo

The next January 6 committee hearing is scheduled for July 12, at 10 a.m. ET.

Catch up on the biggest revelations from the public hearings thus far.


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Teasing new witnesses, Rep. Adam Kinzinger says of Trump and his allies: 'They're all scared. They should be.'

Adam Kinzinger
Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL).Andrew Harnik-Pool/Getty Images

In a series of Sunday tweets, Rep. Adam Kinzinger said Donald Trump and his allies, including House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, are "scared" following last week's testimony by Cassidy Hutchinson before the Jan. 6 select committee.

"This BIPARTISAN committee has been able to find out things that up until recently were denied by the Jan 6th truthers, so they are left with trying to discredit a young woman with more courage than they could muster in a lifetime. Except… that isn't working," Kinzinger tweeted.

"Cassidy doesn't seek the limelight, but she is compelled with honor. She didn't even have to swear an oath to the constitution like Kevin, Elise, Kristi Noem and others did. But she volunteered to come under oath to tell what she knows. She is a better person than them all. "


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Liz Cheney says the January 6 panel won't 'stand by' and let 'men who are claiming executive privilege' attack Cassidy Hutchinson's character

Cassidy Hutchinson
Cassidy Hutchinson, a top former aide to Trump White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, arrives to testify during the sixth hearing by the House Select Committee on the January 6th insurrection in the Cannon House Office Building in Washington, DC, on June 28, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Rep. Liz Cheney in an interview that aired on Sunday reaffirmed her confidence in former Trump White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson's testimony and said that the House panel investigating the January 6, 2021, riot at the Capitol wouldn't sit by idly and let her endure anonymous attacks.

While sitting down with ABC News chief Washington correspondent Jonathan Karl at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, Calif., the Wyoming Republican expressed confidence in Hutchinson and the credibility of future hearings.

"What Cassidy Hutchinson did was an unbelievable example of bravery and of courage and patriotism in the face of real pressure," she said.

"The Committee is not going to stand by and watch her character be assassinated by anonymous sources and by men who are claiming executive privilege. And so we look forward very much to additional testimony under oath on a whole range of issues," she added.


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Kinzinger says new witnesses have been coming forward to the Jan. 6 committee since Cassidy Hutchinson's 'inspiring' testimony

Adam Kinzinger
Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois.Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Rep. Adam Kinzinger says that more witnesses have come forward since Cassidy Hutchinson's blockbuster testimony during the Jan 6. hearings last week.

"She's been inspiring for a lot of people," Kinzinger said Sunday on CNN's  "State of the Union." "Every day, we get new people that come forward and say, 'hey, I didn't think maybe this piece of the story that I knew was important, but now that you guys are talking' — I do see this plays in here."

Hutchinson, an ex-aide to White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, revealed in front of the Jan. 6 committee shocking details of former president Donald Trump's behavior on the day of the Capitol attack, including that he attempted to grab the steering wheel of his SUV and lunged at one of his Secret Service agents, as Insider's Grace Panetta previously reported.

"I mean, look, she is going to go down in history," Kinzinger said, referring to the 25-year-old. "People can forget the names of every one of us on the committee. They will not forget her name. And, by the way, she doesn't want that. She doesn't want to be out in the public spotlight."


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Liz Cheney says the Jan. 6 committee could potentially make multiple criminal referrals, including one against Trump

Liz Cheney
U.S. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) Vice Chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, delivers remarks during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Win McNamee/Getty Images

Rep. Liz Cheney in an interview broadcast on Sunday said that the House committee investigating the January 6, 2021, riot at the Capitol could potentially make multiple criminal referrals, including one against former President Donald Trump.

During an interview on ABC's "This Week," Cheney — who serves as the vice-chair of the panel — was asked by correspondent Jonathan Karl if the work conducted by its members has shown that Trump's conduct warrants prosecution.

"Ultimately, the Justice Department will decide that," the Wyoming Republican said. "I think we may well as a committee have a view on that."

She continued: "If you just think about it from the perspective of what kind of man knows that a mob is armed and sends the mob to attack the Capitol and further incites that mob when his own vice president is under threat — when the Congress is under threat? It's just very chilling. And I think certainly we will continue to present to the American people what we've found."


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DOJ wants a DC judge to reject Steve Bannon's request to delay his contempt-of-Congress trial over January 6 hearings' publicity, saying that he has 'barely been mentioned'

Steve Bannon at court
Steve Bannon argued in April that his criminal prosecution should be dismissed.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

The Department of Justice asked a DC judge on Friday to reject Trump ally Steve Bannon's request to delay his contempt-of-Congress trial, arguing that the January 6 hearings have not revolved around him to the point of distraction.

On Wednesday, Bannon's lawyers asked a DC judge to delay his July 18 trial, citing a "media blitz" from the public January 6 committee hearings and saying the request was "due to the unprecedented level of prejudicial pretrial publicity."

DOJ lawyers said that Bannon is not as popular as he thinks he is.

"The Defendant's motion gives the false impression — through general statistics about the volume of viewership of the Committee's hearings and overall media coverage of the Committee's hearings — that all of the Committee's hearings and the attendant media coverage is about him," DOJ lawyers wrote in a filing on Friday. "The truth is just the opposite — the Defendant has barely been mentioned in the Committee's hearings or the resulting media coverage of them."


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2 Secret Service sources told CNN that Trump angrily demanded to be taken to the Capitol on January 6, partly confirming Cassidy Hutchinson's explosive testimony

Former President Donald Trump
Former President Donald Trump.SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

Two Secret Service sources told CNN on Friday that they heard about former President Donald Trump lunging at the driver of his presidential SUV on January 6, 2021.

The pair of sources, who spoke under the condition of anonymity, backed up much of former Trump aide Cassidy Hutchinson's explosive testimony on the altercation in the motorcade vehicle known as "the Beast" after Trump found out he wouldn't be driven to join his supporters at the Capitol.

"He had sort of lunged forward – it was unclear from the conversations I had that he actually made physical contact, but he might have. I don't know," one of the Secret Service sources told CNN. "Nobody said Trump assaulted him; they said he tried to lunge over the seat – for what reason, nobody had any idea."


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Michael Cohen says Trump uses a 'mob boss' playbook

Michael Cohen, Donald Trump's former personal attorney, compared the former president to a "mob boss" amid allegations that Trump allies sought to intimidate Jan. 6 witnesses.

"Donald Trump never changes his playbook," Cohen told The Washington Post. "He behaves like a mob boss, and these messages are fashioned in that style. Giving an order without giving the order. No fingerprints attached."


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Trump allies paid legal fees for multiple Jan. 6 witnesses, including Cassidy Hutchinson, sparking witness-influencing concerns, report says

Cassidy Hutchinson
Cassidy Hutchinson, a former top aide to Trump White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, testifies before the January 6 committee in Washington, DC, on June 28, 2022.Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump's allies and supporters paid the legal fees for multiple people who had provided testimony to the January 6 committee, including the former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson, The New York Times reported.

Hutchinson eventually fired the lawyer who was paid for a pro-Trump group, and went on to provide damning testimony about Trump, the report said.

Two sources familiar with the committee told The Times that they believe Hutchinson's decision to part ways with the lawyer — who had been recommended by Trump allies and paid for by a pro-Trump PAC — likely played a role in her decision to provide new evidence.

There are no laws against a third party paying for a witness' legal representation in a congressional inquiry, but the situation may raise some ethical concerns, according to the report.


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Former Secret Service agent said he, too, would have defied Trump's request to be taken to the Capitol on January 6

Donald Trump Mike Pence
Former President Donald Trump and former Vice President Mike Pence.PhoPhoto by Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty Images

Former Secret Service agent Jonathan Wackrow said in an op-ed that he also would not have taken then-President Donald Trump to the Capitol on January 6, 2021.

In an op-ed published by Newsweek, Wackrow said he was shocked by Cassidy Hutchinson's testimony to the January committee regarding Trump's actions on the day of the Capitol riot. Hutchinson, a former aide in the Trump White House, claimed that Trump had gotten into a physical altercation with the head of his security detail while demanding to be brought to the Capitol.

"If I had been working on Trump's security detail on January 6, I would have made the same decision as Secret Service Special Agent in Charge Robert Engel to not go to the Capitol based on the known escalating threats," Wackrow wrote.

He added, however, that he believed Trump still respects the Secret Service because he probably has seen "first-hand what they're willing to do to protect him and his family."


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GOP Rep. Adam Kinzinger says Cassidy Hutchinson is a 'hero' and has 'more courage than most' Republicans after January 6 testimony

Cassidy Hutchinson
Cassidy Hutchinson testifies during the sixth hearing by the House Select Committee on the January 6th insurrection.Andrew Harnik-Pool/Getty Images

GOP Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois on Thursday applauded Cassidy Hutchinson for her testimony to the January 6 committee, saying the former top aide to White House chief of staff Mark Meadows has "more courage" than most of his Republican colleagues.

"Cassidy Hutchinson is a hero and a real patriot (not a faux 'patriot' that hates America so much they would attempt a coup.)," Kinzinger, one of two Republicans on the House committee investigating the January 6 insurrection, said in a tweet.

"Of course they will try to bully and intimidate her. But she isn't intimidated. More courage than most in GOP," Kinzinger added of Hutchinson.


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GOP Sen. Pat Toomey says Trump's chances of winning the party's 2024 presidential nomination are 'much more tenuous' following the January 6 committee's hearings

Republican Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania at the White House with Trump in February 2018.
Republican Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania at the White House with Trump in February 2018.AP Photo/Evan Vucci

Republican Sen. Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania suggested Thursday that public hearings from the House select committee investigating January 6, 2021, had damaged former President Donald Trump politically, even among Republicans.

At the end of a wide-ranging interview with Bloomberg that focused on the Supreme Court's recent ruling on the Environmental Protection Agency and the Federal Reserve's approach to tackling inflation, the retiring lawmaker was asked whether he believed the hearings would preclude Trump from seeking a second term as president in 2024.

"I don't know that it means that. I mean he gets to decide whether he's going to run," said Toomey, who was one of seven Republican senators who voted to convict Trump on a charge of incitement of an insurrection after the Capitol riot.

"Look, I think he disqualified himself from serving in public office by virtue of his post-election behavior, especially leading right up to January 6," Toomey said. "I think the revelations from this committee make his path to even the Republican nomination much more tenuous."


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Cheney 'absolutely confident' that former White House aide's explosive testimony is credible

Republican Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming, a nameplate identifying her right in front and a pair of American flags at her back, participates in a January 6 committee meeting on Capitol Hill.
Republican Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming, vice-chair of the select committee investigating the January 6 attack on the Capitol, speaks during a business meeting on Capitol Hill on December 13, 2021 in Washington, DC.Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Republican Rep. Liz Cheney, who serves as vice-chair of the House's January 6 committee, said she is "absolutely confident" that a former White House aide's damning testimony is accurate.

"I am absolutely confident in her credibility. I'm confident in her testimony," Cheney told ABC News's Jonathan Karl about the allegations made by top Trump White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson this week.

Cheney said that Hutchinson showed "an unbelievable example of bravery and of courage" by testifying.


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Bannon wants his contempt trial to be delayed because of Jan. 6 hearings

A head and shoulders view of Steve Bannon outside of the E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse on June 15, 2022 in Washington, DC.
Steve Bannon outside of the E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse on June 15, 2022 in Washington, DC.Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Trump ally Steve Bannon has asked for his contempt-of-Congress trial to be delayed because the hearings on the Capitol riot are getting so much publicity.

A federal grand jury indicted Bannon in November 2021 on two counts of contempt of Congress after he refused to comply with a subpoena from the House committee investigating the Capitol riot.

In a Wednesday court filing, Bannon's lawyers argued that the coverage of the committee's hearings would make his trial unfair.


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January 6 panel subpoenas former White House counsel Pat Cipollone

White House Counsel Pat Cipollone (R) waits for the beginning of a cabinet meeting in the East Room of the White House on May 19, 2020 in Washington, DC. Earlier in the day President Trump met with members of the Senate GOP.
Former White House Counsel Pat Cipollone said he would testify about Jeffrey Clark, a DOJ official who outlined ways for Trump to challenge the 2020 election.Alex Wong/Getty Images

The House's panel investigating the Capitol riot on January 6, 2021, has subpoenaed former White House counsel Pat Cipollone.

The demand for Cipollone to appear before the committee comes after explosive testimony from a former top White House aide in the Trump administration, who described Trump and his inner circle's actions before and during the insurrection.


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Former Secret Service agent says Trump's 'girth' would have made it impossible to attack driver

Trump leaves office
Outgoing US President Donald Trump waves as he boards Marine One at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 20, 2021.MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

A former White House aide testified that former President Donald Trump grabbed the steering wheel of his SUV and lunged at a Secret Service agent on January 6, 2021, after they refused to take him to the Capitol building.

But former Secret Service agents told Insider they have doubts about the story.

"Trump's not a little guy, right? And the space to actually be able to lunge towards the wheel is not that big," one former agent said, speaking on background to Insider.  "I don't mean to sound disparaging to the former president, but just his girth would prevent him from actually getting to the steering wheel."


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House Republican who led rioter on tour before insurrection could oversee Capitol police

Barry Loudermilk
Rep. Barry LoudermilkBill Clark/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images

Republican Rep. Barry Loudermilk — who led a Capitol rioter on a tour of the building the day before the insurrection — could end up overseeing Capitol police.

If Republicans regain control of the House, Loudermilk would be next in line to lead the committee that has oversight over the police force attacked by Trump supporters on January 6, 2021.

Loudermilk has faced backlash from Democrats after video showed him taking a group on a tour of the Capitol building, showing them hallways, security areas, and stairwells. The next day, members of the tour flaunted a sharpened flagpole bearing the American flag as they marched near the Capitol.

It remains unclear whether the group entered the Capitol building itself during the riot.


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Former Jan. 6 committee investigator announces run for Senate

Senior investigative counsel John Wood questions witnesses during the third public hearing of the January 6 committee on June 16, 2022.
Senior investigative counsel John Wood questions witnesses during the third public hearing of the January 6 committee on June 16, 2022.Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

January 6 committee investigator John Wood is launching an independent Senate campaign in Missouri in an effort to stop GOP nominee Eric Greitens.

Wood told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that he believes Greitens — the former Missouri governor — is likely to win the Republican nomination, and that voters deserved an alternative.

Wood, a Republican, said he will run as an independent.


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Trump ally says Hutchinson's testimony was a 'campaign commercial' for Ron DeSantis in 2024

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis addresses a joint session of the legislature, Tuesday, January 11, 2022, in Tallahassee, Florida.
Florida Gov. Ron DeSantisPhelan M. Ebenhack/AP Photo

Explosive testimony by a former Trump White House aide could be a boost to Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis to replace Trump on the presidential ticket in 2024, CNN reported.

One Trump adviser said the hearings — which painted as Trump as violent and volatile — were "basically a campaign commercial" for DeSantis. Another told CNN that "no one is taking this lightly."

DeSantis has flirted with larger political ambitions and is a rising Republican star who would be poised to fill the leadership vacuum if Trump is forced aside.


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Secret Service agents willing to dispute Hutchinson's claims about Trump's outburst, reports say

Donald Trump speaks in front of firework smoke from a July 4 celebration.
Former President Donald TrumpSAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

Secret Service agents are willing to testify before the January 6 House panel to refute former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson's claim that Trump tried to grab the steering wheel when he demanded to be taken to the Capitol on the day of the insurrection, according to multiple reports.

The driver of the car and the head of Trump's security are ready to testify under oath that the former President never lunged for the wheel or physically assaulted the driver, according to CBS News.


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Hutchinson's testimony could lead to legal trouble for Trump: report

Cassidy Hutchinson
Cassidy Hutchinson, former aide to Trump White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, testifies as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol continues to reveal its findings of a year-long investigation, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, June 28, 2022.Jacquelyn Martin/AP Photo

Former aides to Donald Trump worry the explosive testimony by a former White House aide could put Trump in legal jeopardy, according to the New York Times.

"This hearing definitely gave investigators a lot to chew on," former Attorney General Bill Barr told the Times after testimony from top White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson detailed Trump's behavior on the day of the Capitol riot.

Hutchinson's testimony painted Trump as a volatile man who knew his supporters were armed on January 6, 2021. Trump also demanded to be taken to the Capitol building, but his security staff refused, Hutchinson said.

Mick Mulvaney, who was once Trump's White House Chief of Staff, said evidence of possible witness tampering could open his orbit up to charges.


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Former Trump press secretary shares text that appears to show Melania Trump to condemn Capitol riot violence

Melania Trump speaks at the White House on October 09, 2019
Melania Trump speaks at the White House on October 09, 2019Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Former Trump Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham shared a text exchange on Tuesday that purportedly showed former First Lady Melania Trump refusing to condemn the violence during the Capitol riot.

The apparent screengrab of a text exchange was between Grisham and a person named "MT."

"Do you want to tweet that peaceful protests are the right of every American, but there is no place for lawlessness & violence?" read the message.

"No," the person replied.

Representatives for Melania Trump at Trump's post-presidential press office did not respond to a request for comment from Insider.


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John Eastman drops lawsuit blocking his phone records from January 6 committee

John Eastman testifies before the House Ways and Means Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 4, 2013.
John Eastman testifies before the House Ways and Means Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 4, 2013.Charles Dharapak/AP

In a late Tuesday filing, John Eastman dropped a lawsuit he'd filed to prevent the Jan. 6 committee from accessing his phone records.

"Plaintiff brought this lawsuit primarily to protect the content of his communications, many of which are privileged," the latest filing read. "The Congressional Defendants represented in their motion to dismiss that they were not seeking the content of any of Plaintiff's communications via the subpoena they had issued to Defendant Verizon."

The former Trump lawyer's phone was seized by federal agents on June 22, according to a separate suit he filed on Monday, seeking the return of his property. Of interest to investigators are call logs from Eastman's personal device, and the search warrant indicates investigators will not review any additional content from his phone without a court order.


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Trumpworld shocked by former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson's explosive January 6 testimony, calling it the 'most damning day' and 'insane'

Cassidy Hutchinson
Cassidy Hutchinson, former aide to Trump White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, testifies as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol continues to reveal its findings of a year-long investigation, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, June 28, 2022.Jacquelyn Martin/AP Photo

It took six hearings for the January 6 select committee to finally break through to embattled former President Donald Trump's inner circle.

Cassidy Hutchinson, a top aide to then-White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, testified during a surprise hearing Tuesday that Trump was determined to go to the US Capitol with his armed supporters on January 6, 2021, as Congress was certifying the election results.

Hutchinson's additional revelations about that day came crashing down on Trumpworld during the two-hour hearing. Among them were that Meadows told Hutchinson "things might get real, real bad" on January 6, that Trump knew his supporters were armed when they flooded the Ellipse to attend his "Stop the Steal" rally, and that Trump said "Mike deserves it" when rioters chanted "hang Mike Pence."

"Definitely most damning day of testimony," one former White House aide told Insider.

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Fox News host says it's not 'wholly out of character' that Trump 'might throw his lunch' after January 6 testimony on ketchup dripping down the wall

Former President Donald Trump and Fox News Chief Political Anchor Bret Baier.
Former President Donald Trump and Fox News Chief Political Anchor Bret Baier.Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty Images

Moments after a colleague referred to Tuesday's January 6 committee testimony as "stunning," Fox News host Martha MacCallum downplayed new revelations about former President Donald Trump's violent outbursts surrounding his efforts to overturn the 2020 election.

Former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson testified that Trump threw a plate in the White House dining room after he found out former Attorney General Bill Barr publicly said there was no evidence of widespread voter fraud, leaving "ketchup dripping down the wall."

"I mean, I'm not sure that it really shocks anybody that the president just — knowing what we've seen, observing him over the years — if he got angry then he might throw his lunch," MacCallum said. "I'm not sure. It's obviously a very dramatic detail, and the way that she describes it, um, is. But I'm not sure if this is wholly out of character with the Donald Trump and the President Trump that people came to know over the years."

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Here are all the people who sought preemptive pardons from Donald Trump after the Capitol riot, per January 6 committee witnesses

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., joined from left by Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Texas, and Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., speaks at a news conference about the treatment of people being held in the District of Columbia jail who are charged with crimes in the Jan. 6 insurrection, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2021.
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., joined from left by Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Texas, and Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., speaks at a news conference about the treatment of people being held in the District of Columbia jail who are charged with crimes in the Jan. 6 insurrection, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2021.J. Scott Applewhite/AP

At least nine people close to former President Donald Trump requested preemptive presidential pardons in the wake of the Capitol attack, according to testimony shared with the January 6 panel.

At least six Republican lawmakers were among those who reportedly requested the pardons and a former top White House aide on Tuesday alleged that former White House Chied of Staff Mark Meadows and former Trump counsel Rudy Giuliani also asked the president for pardons.

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Trump rattles off a dozen livid social media posts as ex-aide gives explosive testimony to Jan. 6 panel

Donald Trump speaking
A trailer for a documentary that centers on Trump and January 6 was released by Discovery Plus.Seth Herald/Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump on Tuesday unleashed a dozen social media posts in the wake of the testimony of a former top White House aide before the January 6 committee, calling the staffer a "total phony," "third rate social climber' and suggesting she was a "whacko" because of her handwriting.

"There is no cross examination of this so-called witness. This is a Kangaroo Court!" Trump wrote on his social media platform.

In another post, he said that her "body language is that of a total bull…. artist. Fantasy Land!"

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A former Trump White House chief of staff says the latest January 6 hearing provided 'stunning' new evidence of potential criminality

Mick Mulvaney and Donald Trump seated in front of flags
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 05: U.S. President Donald Trump (R) and Acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney (L) listen to comments during a luncheon with representatives of the United Nations Security Council, in the Cabinet Room at the White House on December 5, 2019 in Washington, DC.Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Tuesday's congressional hearing on the insurrection was a "very, very bad day" for the former president, former Trump White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney said.

The hearing featured a former White House aide testifying that Donald Trump knew some protesters were armed before they marched to the US Capitol — and that his own top advisors asked for pardons after the January 6 riot.

"A stunning 2 hours," Mulvaney, a onetime Trump loyalist, posted on Twitter following the testimony of Cassidy Hutchinson, a former aide to Mark Meadows, who succeeded Mulvaney as Trump's White House chief of staff.

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A Capitol Police officer injured on January 6 said 'our own president set us up'

Capitol Police Sgt. Aquilino Gonell
US Capitol Police Sgt. Aquilino Gonell wipes his eye as he watches a video being displayed during a House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 27, 2021.Jim Bourg/Pool via AP

A US Capitol Police officer injured during the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol told HuffPost's Igor Bobic "our own president set us up" during the sixth public hearing of the House committee investigating the Capitol riot.

Sgt. Aquilino Gonell, an Army veteran who was in the room during Tuesday's hearing, testified before Congress last year about the injuries he suffered while defending the Capitol. Gonell underwent surgery and was moved to desk duty as a result of the injuries he sustained to his foot and shoulder while being physically attacked by rioters during the Capitol siege.

"I just feel betrayed," Gonell told Bobic on Tuesday. "The president should be doing everything possible to help us and he didn't do it. He wanted to lead the mob and wanted to lead the crowd himself ... he wanted to be a tyrant."

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Congressman says Trump sent police to the Capitol to be 'potentially slaughtered'

Trump supporters fighting police on January 6
Trump supporters clash with police and security forces as people try to storm the US Capitol on January 6, 2021.Brent Stirton/Getty Images

Democratic Rep. Ruben Gallego said US Capitol cops were 'sent to be potentially slaughtered' on January 6 after a former White House staffer gave stunning testimony that former President Donald Trump knew that protesters were armed and heading to the Capitol.

"If it wasn't because of this brave 25-year-old woman, we wouldn't even know what was happening," the Arizona lawmaker told reporters at the hearing on Thursday, referring to Cassidy Hutchinson. "This is a very sad moment in our country right now."


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Former top White House aide says Trump's attacks on Pence 'disgusted' her

Cassidy Hutchinson
Former Trump White House aide Cassidy HutchinsonJacquelyn Martin/AP

Former top Trump White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson said ex-President Donald Trump's attacks on then-Vice President Mike Pence during the Capitol riot "disgusted" her.

"I remember feeling frustrated, disappointed, and really, it felt personal, I was really sad," she testified when asked for her reaction to Trump's praise of the rioters on January 6, 2021. "As an American, I was disgusted. It was unpatriotic, it was un-American. We were watching the Capitol building get defaced over a lie."


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Liz Cheney shares evidence of witness tampering at Jan. 6 hearing

Liz Cheney
US Representative Liz CheneyPhoto by OLIVIER DOULIERY/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

January 6 panel vice chair and GOP Rep. Liz Cheney shared two messages purportedly received by witnesses before their testimony that she said are signs of witness tampering.

Cheney shared two messages that she said witnesses had received ahead of their depositions. The witnesses, who Cheney didn't name, subsequently shared the messages with the committee.

In one, a witness received a phone call: "[A person] let me know you have your deposition tomorrow. He wants me to let you know that he's thinking about you. He knows you're loyal, and you're going to do the right thing when you go in for your deposition," the caller allegedly said.

Witness tampering is a federal crime.


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Ex-White House aide said she wanted Mark Meadows to 'snap out of it' during Capitol riot

Mark Meadows
Former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows.AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Trump White House chief of staff Mark Meadows' former top aide testified that she wanted him to "snap out it" and pay attention to the chaos unfolding at the Capitol building on January 6, 2021.

During her testimony before the January 6 committee, Cassidy Hutchinson said she saw Meadows on his couch on his phone as rioters stormed the Capitol building and fought with police.

Hutchinson said she asked Meadows: "The rioters are getting really close. Have you talked with the president?"

Meadows allegedly replied: "No, he wants to be alone right now."


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Rudy Giuliani and Mark Meadows both sought pardons from Trump

Rudy Guiliani / Mark Meadows
Rudy Giuliani and Mark MeadowsGetty Images

Donald Trump's lawyer and ex-mayor Rudy Giuliani as well as the president's Chief of Staff Mark Meadows both sought pardons after the Capitol riot on January 6, 2021.

That's according to explosive testimony from Meadows' aide during a House hearing investigating the insurrection.


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Trump threw dishes and flipped tablecloths 'several times' while at the White House: former aide

Cassidy Hutchinson
Cassidy Hutchinson, a former top aide to Trump White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, testifies before the January 6 committee in Washington, DC, on June 28, 2022.Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump's temper flared "several times" in the White House, a former top aide says, recounting how he threw dishes and flipped tablecloths in the White House dining room.

"There were several times throughout my tenure with the chief of staff that I was aware of him [Trump] either throwing dishes or flipping the tablecloth to let all the contents of the table go onto the floor and likely break or go everywhere," said former aide Cassidy Hutchinson.

After one outburst, Hutchinson said she had to wipe ketchup off the wall.


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Fox News host: Trump throwing his lunch isn't 'wholly out of character'

Fox News host Martha MacCallum downplayed new revelations about former President Donald Trump's violent outbursts while he attempted to overturn the 2020 election.

Former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson testified that Trump threw a plate in the White House dining room after he found out former Attorney General Bill Barr publicly said there was no evidence of widespread voter fraud, leaving "ketchup dripping down the wall."

MacCallum said the alleged outburst didn't sound "wholly out of character," even as a Fox News colleague called the revelations "stunning."


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Donald Trump says he 'hardly' knows the former top aide who gave damning testimony against him

Donald Trump hearings January
Donald TrumpChet Strange/Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump called the ex-White House aide who gave damning testimony about his actions on January 6 "bad news" and said he "hardly" knew her.

"I hardly know who this person, Cassidy Hutchinson, is, other than I heard very negative things about her (a total phony and "leaker") ...," Trump wrote in part on his social media platform, Truth.


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Mike Flynn pleaded the 5th when asked whether the violence on January 6 was justified

Former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn at a campaign event in Brunswick, Ohio on April 21, 2022.
Former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn at a campaign event in Brunswick, Ohio on April 21, 2022.Dustin Franz/Getty Images

Mike Flynn, a former 3-star general and Trump's national security advisor, waited over a minute before pleading the Fifth Amendment when asked if violence during the Capitol riot was justified.

During a House panel on the insurrection, committee vice chair Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming aired a clip of Flynn appearing to struggle with the question.

Flynn also refused to say whether he supported the peaceful transition of power.


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Trump threw his lunch at the wall after Barr said there wasn't widespread voter fraud: ex-aide

Cassidy Hutchinson
Cassidy Hutchinson, a top former aide to Trump White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, testifies during the sixth hearing by the House Select Committee on the January 6th insurrection in the Cannon House Office Building on June 28, 2022 in Washington, DC.Andrew Harnik-Pool/Getty Images

A former top White House aide testified that ex-President Donald Trump threw his lunch at a wall after then-Attorney General Bill Barr told him there was no evidence of widespread voter fraud.

"There was ketchup dripping down the wall and there was a shattered porcelain plate on the floor," Cassidy Hutchinson testified on Tuesday before a House panel investigating the Capitol riot on January 6, 2021.


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Trump said Mike Pence 'deserves it' as Capitol rioters chanted that he should be hung: ex-aide

Trump, Pence
Donald Trump and former US Vice President Mike Pence in the Brady Briefing Room at the White House on April 2, 2020, in Washington, DC.MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump defended Capitol rioters who were chanting to hang Vice President Mike Pence during the Capitol riot, a top White House aide testified.

"Mike deserves it," Trump allegedly said, according to testimony from ex-aide Cassidy Hutchinson.

Donald Trump also said that the rioters storming the Capitol building "weren't doing anything wrong."


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Ex-aide says top GOP Rep. Kevin McCarthy warned White House officials that Trump shouldn't go to the Capitol on January 6

McCarthy/Trump
President Donald Trump (R) speaks as he joined by House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) (L) in the Rose Garden of the White House on January 4, 2019 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty Images

Former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson testified that top House Republican Kevin McCarthy called White House advisors on January 6, 2021, warning that then-president Donald Trump should not come to the US Capitol.

Hutchinson told a House panel that she got a call from McCarthy after Trump's speech on the Ellipse that day. McCarthy wasn't convinced that Trump wasn't planning to make his way to the Capitol building.

"Well, he just said it on stage, Cassidy. Figure it out. Don't come up here," she testified he said in the call.


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Trump lunged at his driver and demanded to be taken to the Capitol on January 6.

Donald Trump
Former President Donald Trump.AP Photo/Joe Maiorana

Former President Donald Trump lunged at his driver and tried to grab the steering wheel on January 6, 2021, as he demanded to be taken to the Capitol building as his supporters were marching away from his speech that morning, a former aide testified.

Cassidy Hutchinson, a former top aide to the then-White House chief of staff, told a House panel investigating the Capitol riot that a Secret Service agent relayed the story of what happened to her.

Hutchinson said that Trump "said something to the effect of 'I'm the effing president, take me up to the Capitol now.' "


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Trump knew the January 6 crowd was armed, but said 'they're not here to hurt me,' aide testifies

Donald Trump speaking
Donald TrumpSeth Herald/Getty Images

A former White House aide said Donald Trump knew that his supporters were armed on January 6 hours before they stormed the Capitol building.

"I don't fucking care that they have weapons. They're not here to hurt me," Trump said the morning of the insurrection at the US Capitol, according to former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson.

Hutchinson said Trump was incensed that there were gaps in the crowd of his speech on January 6.


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Trump was 'fucking furious' armed supporters couldn't get to his speech: former aide

Cassidy Hutchinson raising her right hand to be sworn under oath.
Former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson.Brandon Bell/Getty Images

An ex-White House aide testified that President Donald Trump was "fucking furious" that people in the MAGA crowd weren't able to get to his speech on January 6, 2021 because they were carrying weapons.

Trump was insistent that security remove the metal detectors outside the White House so more people with weapons could get into the grounds, former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson told the House panel investigating the insurrection.

She also quoted the president as saying: "Take the fucking mags away. Let my people in. They can march to the Capitol from here."


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Feds seized John Eastman's phone

John Eastman testifies before the House Ways and Means Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 4, 2013.
John Eastman testifies before the House Ways and Means Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 4, 2013.Charles Dharapak/AP

Another big development emerged Monday in the widening federal criminal probe into Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election.

This one involves federal agents who seized the phone of John Eastman, a conservative lawyer who advised Trump during his failed bid to stop the inauguration of Joe Biden. Eastman made the feds' move public in a filing with a New Mexico federal court, seeking the return of property from the government.

According to his filing, FBI agents acting on behalf of DOJ's internal watchdog stopped Eastman as he was leaving a restaurant in New Mexico on June 22, taking his phone.


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Cassidy Hutchinson in the spotlight

Cassidy Hutchinson’s testimony is shown during the fifth January 6 committee hearing on June 23, 2022.
Cassidy Hutchinson’s testimony is shown during the fifth January 6 committee hearing on June 23, 2022.Demetrius Freeman-Pool/Getty Images

Cassidy Hutchinson is the surprise lead witness for Tuesday's sixth hearing of the House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection.

The former top aide under then-White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows is a direct witness to many of the events and discussions of interest to the panel.

She's given the committee several important pieces of information, including the six GOP House members who sought pardons from Trump and that the president told Meadows he agreed with rioters demands to "hang" Vice President Mike Pence.


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Select committee announces surprise hearing.

January 6 committee chair Rep. Bennie Thompson of Mississippi speaks to reporters following the committee’s fifth hearing on June 23, 2022.
January 6 committee chair Rep. Bennie Thompson of Mississippi speaks to reporters following the committee’s fifth hearing on June 23, 2022.Brandon Bell/Getty Images

The Jan. 6 select committee announced it would hold a sixth hearing to start Tuesday at 1 p.m. ET during the congressional recess and despite previous statements that it would hold its next hearings in July.

A committee advisory said it would present "recently obtained evidence" and feature witnesses, whom it did not name.


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Kamala Harris said she commended her vice presidential predecessor Mike Pence for 'courage' in certifying Biden as president despite Trump's pressure

Vice President Kamala Harris.
Vice President Kamala Harris.Al Drago-Pool/Getty Images

Vice President Kamala Harris said Monday that she commended former Vice President Mike Pence for certifying Joe Biden as president on January 6 despite him facing tremendous pressure by former President Donald Trump to overturn the election.

"I think that he did his job that day," Harris said in a CNN interview after reporter Dana Bash asked her whether her opinion of Pence had changed. "And I commend him for that because clearly it was under extraordinary circumstances that he should have not had to face. And I commend him for having the courage to do his job."

This month the House Select Committee probing the January 6 Capitol attack has detailed how Trump tried to push Pence not to recognize Biden's victory in the days leading up to January 6, 2021. Trump wanted Pence to "send back" slates of electors for Biden back to their states in order to overturn his election loss.

But Pence put out an open letter saying he didn't have the authority to take such actions, and his role in the certification process was largely ceremonial.


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Kevin McCarthy says it's 'all good' between him and Trump as the former president fumes about the lack of Republicans on the Jan. 6 committee: 'The right decision was the decision I made'

Donald Trump, Kevin McCarthy
Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) and President Donald Trump.Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times/POOL/Getty Images

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said on Monday that everything is good between him and Donald Trump as the former president publicly questions whether it was wise to keep more Republicans off of the House January 6 committee.

"The right decision was the decision I made," McCarthy told Fox News' Dana Perino. "If other people change their opinion, read the rules and I think they'll come back to the same conclusion."

The former president and McCarthy have talked recently, according to the top House Republican. When Perino asked if things were "all good?" McCarthy responded, "Oh, all good. Yes."

McCarthy repeated his long-held defense of the decision, arguing that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi would have only selected Republicans that would have fit her views. The California Republican then named three of the 10 Republicans who voted to impeach Trump as examples of people Pelosi would have supported.


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How to watch the House January 6 committee hearings on the Capitol attack

January 6 hearing no.2
Video featuring former President Donald Trump’s White House senior adviser and son-in-law Jared Kushner is played during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol in the Cannon House Office Building on June 13, 2022 in Washington, DC. Stepien, who was scheduled to testify in person, was unable to attend due to a family emergency. The bipartisan committee, which has been gathering evidence for almost a year related to the January 6 attack at the U.S. Capitol, will present its findings in a series of televised hearings. On January 6, 2021, supporters of former President Donald Trump attacked the U.S. Capitol Building during an attempt to disrupt a congressional vote to confirm the electoral college win for President Joe Biden.Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images

The House Select Committee Investigating the January 6 Insurrection at the US Capitol is bringing to light its findings from a year's worth of work with a series of public hearings this summer.

The select committee, formed in May 2021, has nine members, seven Democrats, including Chairman Rep. Bennie Thompson, and two Republicans, Reps. Liz Cheney and Adam Kinzinger.

Its members and staff have spent the past year conducting hundreds of closed-door interviews, poring over hundreds of thousands of documents, and parsing phone and email records to reconstruct how President Donald Trump and his allies sought to overturn his 2020 election loss before a mob of pro-Trump rioters breached the US Capitol in an effort to stop the final certification of the 2020 election.

Five public hearings, including one in primetime, have already taken place, and one more hearing is scheduled for Tuesday, June 28.


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January 6 hearing takeaways: Pardon pleas, more Bill Barr, and a riveting account of how Trump turned to the Justice Department and a loyal lawyer to 'help legitimize his lies'

DOJ panel House Jan
TheBill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)

Spanning more than two hours in the late afternoon, the House January 6 committee's fifth public hearing captured the drama that unfolded inside the Justice Department and White House as Trump looked to some of the country's most senior and important law enforcement officials to help him remain in power.

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Matt Gaetz 'personally' pushed for a pardon from Trump 'from the beginning of time up until today, for any and all things,' Trump officials testify

Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida at the White House on May 8, 2020.
Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida at the White House on May 8, 2020.Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images

The January 6 committee aired a series of video testimonies from former Trump administration officials detailing which Republican members of Congress sought pardons from former President Donald Trump at the end of his term as he and his allies exhausted different avenues to stay in power.

Most prominently featured: Republican Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida.

According to various officials who spoke with the committee, Gaetz began pushing for a pardon well before other Republicans who were involved in the attempt to overturn the 2020 election.

"Mr. Gaetz was personally pushing for a pardon, and he was doing so since early December," said Cassidy Hutchinson, a former aide to White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, in testimony aired by the committee on Thursday.

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Fox News cut away from the Jan. 6 hearing minutes before testimony by Trump aides about GOP lawmakers who sought pardons

Grey plaque that says "Fox" at the entrance to Fox News headquarters in New York
Plaque at the entrance to Fox News headquarters in New YorkErik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images

Just as former Department of Justice Officials were detailing how they threatened to resign en masse if former President Donald Trump went ahead with his efforts to overturn the 2020 election results, Fox News cut away to air its previously scheduled talk show, "The Five."

CNN and MSNBC aired the hearings in full, which ended with Rep. Adam Kinzinger listing six GOP lawmakers whom Trump aides testified sought pardons in the administration's final weeks.

Other than the first of the five hearings so far, Fox News has carried the proceedings without commercial breaks, save for recesses during the proceedings.

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DOJ officials threatened to resign if Jeffrey Clark was appointed Attorney General

Jeff Clark and Jeff Rosen
Jeff ClarkYuri Gripas-Pool/Getty Images

Top officials at the US Department of Justice threatened to resign if former President Donald Trump succeeded in making loyalist Jeff Clark the acting Attorney General, per testimony before the January 6 committee on Thursday.

Richard Donoghue, former acting deputy attorney general, said that the pledge to resign was made on a phone call in the wake of reports that Trump was considering installing Clark, who at the time was promoting unfounded conspiracy theories about the 2020 election.

"They would resign en masse if the president made that change," Donoghue told the committee. "All without hesitation said they would resign."

At least six GOP members of Congress sought pardons after January 6, 2021, per testimony from a former White House aide

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., joined from left by Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Texas, and Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., speaks at a news conference about the treatment of people being held in the District of Columbia jail who are charged with crimes in the Jan. 6 insurrection, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2021.
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., joined from left by Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Texas, and Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fla., speaks at a news conference about the treatment of people being held in the District of Columbia jail who are charged with crimes in the Jan. 6 insurrection, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2021.J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Cassidy Hutchinson, a former aide to former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, testified Wednesday before the January 6 House panel that at least six House members asked the White House for a pardon following the Capitol siege.

According to Hutchinson, Republican Reps. Matt Gaetz of Florida, Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia, Mo Brooks of Alabama, Andy Biggs of Arizona, Louie Gohmert of Texas, and Scott Perry of Pennsylvania requested pardons.

The former White House aide added that GOP Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio asked for an "update on whether the White House is going to pardon members of Congress" but did not personally ask for one.


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Trump suggested sending letter to states alleging 2020 election fraud, a former acting Attorney General Jeff Rosen testified

Jeff Rosen DOJ
Former acting Attorney General Jeff Rosen has already testified about Trump's efforts to pressure DOJ.Yuri Gripas-Pool/Getty Images

Former acting Attorney General Jeff Rosen said on Thursday that then-President Donald Trump suggested that the Justice Department send letters to state legislatures in Georgia and other states alleging that there was voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election despite knowing there was no such evidence.

Rosen told lawmakers on the House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection that during Trump's final days in office, the former president and his campaign suggested several strategies for the Justice Department to overturn the presidential election results. These tactics included filing a lawsuit with the Supreme Court, making public statements, and holding a press conference.

"The Justice Department declined all of those requests that I was just referencing because we did not think they were appropriate based on the facts and the law, as we understood," Rosen said.


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A former Trump DOJ official testified that former President Donald Trump urged him and other officials to 'just say the election was corrupt'

Notes from Richard Donogue displayed at the January 6 committee's hearing on June 23, 2022.
Notes from Richard Donoghue displayed at the January 6 committee's hearing on June 23, 2022.Screenshot / C-SPAN

The January 6 committee on Thursday displayed scans of notes taken by Richard Donoghue, then the acting deputy attorney general serving out the final days of the Trump administration.

One note, displayed as Republican Rep. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois led the committee's questioning, included an apparent plea from then-President Donald Trump to "just say the election was corrupt" and "leave the rest to me and the [Republican] congressmen."


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Bill Barr says he's 'not sure we would have had a transition at all' to Biden if DOJ hadn't investigated Trump's baseless voter fraud claims

Bill Barr and Donald Trump
Former Attorney General Bill Barr and former President Donald TrumpDrew Angerer/Getty Images

Former Attorney General William Barr said he was "not sure we would have had a transition at all" if the Justice Department had not investigated Donald Trump's claims of widespread voter fraud and found them baseless.

In a closed-door deposition, Barr suggested to the House committee investigating the January 6 attack that Trump might not have left office voluntarily if DOJ had not proactively examined the election fraud claims ahead of Joe Biden's inauguration.


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'You would be committing a felony'

Eric Herschmann
Eric Herschmann spoke to the Jan. 6 committee on Thursday.Senate Television via AP

Former White House attorney Eric Herschmann told the committee that he brutally mocked a plan from a Trump loyalist to hijack control of the Justice Department in a last-ditch effort to overturn the 2020 election.

"And when he finished discussing what he planned on doing, I said, 'good, fucking, excuse me, f-ing, a-hole, congratulations you just admitted that your first step or act you would take as attorney general would be committing a felony and violating rule 6c," Herschmann told the panel, per an excerpt of his previously private deposition that was released on Thursday.


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Fast times in the Capitol

Actor Sean Penn and DC Metropolitan Police Department officer Daniel Hodges at the January 6 committee hearing on Capitol Hill on June 23, 2022.
Actor Sean Penn and DC Metropolitan Police Department officer Daniel Hodges at the January 6 committee hearing on Capitol Hill on June 23, 2022.AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Sean Penn is in the House.

The actor and well known Hollywood activist made an unexpected appearance at the fifth hearing of the House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection.

"I'm just here to observe — just another citizen," Penn told a CNN reporter. "I think we all saw what happened on January 6 and now we're looking to see if justice comes on the other side of it."

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Liz Cheney is mailing instructions to Democrats on how to change parties and vote for her in Wyoming's GOP primary

Liz Cheney
U.S. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) Vice Chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, delivers remarks during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Win McNamee/Getty Images

As Rep. Liz Cheney faces a tough reelection battle in Wyoming, she's turning to Democrats in her home state to help her chances in the August 16 Republican primary.

Cheney's campaign has mailed instructions to Wyoming Democrats on how to change their party affiliation to vote for the incumbent congresswoman, The New York Times reported on Thursday. Under Wyoming law, voters must be registered as a Democrat or a Republican in order to vote in that party's primary election.


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Feds search home of former top Trump DOJ official

Jeff Clark and Jeff Rosen
Jeff ClarkYuri Gripas-Pool/Getty Images

We've got a major development that surfaced Thursday into what appears to be a widening federal investigation into Donald Trump's bid to overturn the 2020 presidential election.

Federal investigators on Wednesday searched the Northern Virginia home of Jeff Clark, a former top Justice Department official who became the go-to Trump ally trying to push DOJ into backing the then-president's baseless claims about voter fraud.

ABC News first reported this, and a DOJ spokesperson has since confirmed to Insider's Ryan Barber that law enforcement activity did indeed happen in the Washington DC suburb where Clark lives. The spokesperson wouldn't comment on the nature of the activity or about any specific individuals.

Expect to hear Clark's name a couple times or more during Thursday's House select committee hearing as the panel examines Trump's efforts to use DOJ in his bid to stop Joe Biden from being sworn in as the country's 46th president.


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#unprecedented

Donald Trump speaking
A trailer for a documentary that centers on Trump and January 6 was released by Discovery Plus.Seth Herald/Getty Images

Here's something that doesn't show up on the internet very often: a 30-second trailer for a new three-part documentary taking people behind the scenes of Donald Trump's presidency and the January 6 insurrection.

But that's exactly what landed online late Wednesday via Discovery+, which shows footage of the new series titled "Unprecedented." The clip features Trump and his adult children Ivanka, Donald Trump Jr., and Eric Trump and closes with the ex-president himself agreeing to discuss the riot at the US Capitol.

House January 6 investigators have the documentary footage too, courtesy of a subpoena that Politico reported about. And Trump allies were apparently in the dark about the filming, with one texting Rolling Stone: "what the fuck is this?"


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Hearings to resume at 3 p.m. ET Thursday with testimony expected from former DOJ officials

Jeff Rosen DOJ
Former Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen.Yuri Gripas-Pool/Getty Images

The January 6 commission's fifth hearing is expected to start at 3 p.m. Thursday, with testimony expected from former Trump-administration Justice Department officials. They are:

  • Jeffrey Rosen, former acting attorney general

  • Richard Donoghue, former acting deputy attorney general

  • Steven Engel, former assistant attorney general for the Office of Legal Counsel

Rosen served as acting attorney general in the final weeks of Trump's presidency. He previously told the committee how he came under persistent pressure from Trump to have the DOJ back Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, as Insider's C. Ryan Barber reported.

Toward the end of his presidency, Trump considered ousting Rosen and installing Jeffrey Clark, a supporter of the bogus voter-fraud claims, in his place, but ultimately decided not to after officials threatened to resign if he went through.

Analysis: Trump shot himself in the foot by opposing a bipartisan Jan. 6 commission because now he has no allies to defend him in scathing public hearings

A screenshot of a Trump campaign site
Lawmakers listen as an image of a Trump campaign donation banner is shown behind them during a House January 6 committee hearing.Susan Walsh/AP

As the House's January 6 committee lays out in devastating detail Donald Trump's effort to overturn his defeat in the 2020 election, the former president is turning his anger on House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy.

Trump has complained about McCarthy's decision to boycott the panel, with the former president telling the Punchbowl newsletter on Wednesday: "Republicans don't have a voice. They don't even have anything to say."

But Trump has no one but himself to blame for the situation, one of his Republican critics pointed out, as he was the one who opposed the formation of a bipartisan commission equally split between Republicans and Democrats to investigate the riot.


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Trump is hate-watching every Jan. 6 hearing and almost screams at the TV because he feels nobody is defending him, report says

Donald Trump CPAC Florida
Donald TrumpJoe Raedle/Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump is hate-watching the January 6 committee hearings, incensed because he believes nobody is defending him, according to The Washington Post.

Trump is at "the point of about to scream at the TV" as he tunes in to each hearing, one unnamed close advisor told the paper.

Another in his circle, also unnamed, told the paper that Trump continually complains that "there's no one to defend me" at the hearings, which have attracted huge amounts of media coverage.

Per The Post, Trump's anger centers on House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, who boycotted the committee at its formation, passing up the chance to put pro-Trump figures on the panel.


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DOJ issued subpoenas to alleged fake Trump electors and a Trump campaign official, reports say

The words "January 6th" are prominently displayed on a projection screen placed above the House select committee members during the panel's first public hearing on June 9, 2022.
A general view shows a House January 6 committee hearing on Capitol Hill on June 9, 2022.Mandel Ngan/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

The Justice Department expanded its investigation into the Capitol riot after issuing subpoenas to a would-be Trump elector in Georgia and a Trump campaign official who worked in Arizona and New Mexico, The Washington Post and The New York Times reported Wednesday.

Arizona, Georgia, and New Mexico are among the seven battleground states where a failed effort to overturn the election took place by appointing pro-Trump electors.

The news comes after Rep. Adam Schiff said the House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection obtained evidence that former President Donald Trump was involved in the aforementioned scheme.


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Trump aides didn't know someone was filming Trump on January 6 until the House committee got the footage: reports

President Trump in the Oval Office with Jared Kushner speaking behind him.
President Donald Trump listens as Jared Kushner speaks in the Oval Office of the White House on September 11, 2020.Andrew Harnik/AP Photo

Aides to Donald Trump had no idea a documentary maker filmed the former president on January 6, 2021, until the House committee investigating that day subpoenaed the footage, reports said.

The existence of the footage by UK documentarian Alex Holder was first reported by Politico on Tuesday.

The outlet said that Holder complied with the House committee request and handed over several months of footage of Trump up to and including January 6.

The New York Times reported that many top Trump advisors were surprised by news of the project, which was known to only a small circle of close Trump aides.


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Ivanka Trump claimed to believe Trump's false voter-fraud theories but later told Jan. 6 panel she didn't, report says

Ivanka Trump
Ivanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Ivanka Trump claimed to believe former President Donald Trump's false voter-fraud theories in a December 2020 interview, directly contradicting her testimony to congressional investigators earlier this year, a new report says.

In April 2022, Trump had told the House committee investigating the Capitol riot that she had "accepted" former Attorney General Bill Barr's assessment that Donald Trump's claims of election fraud were wrong.

But according to The New York Times, Ivanka Trump told the documentary filmmaker Alex Holder on December 10, 2020 — nine days after Barr made the assessment that supposedly swayed her — that she supported her father's efforts to challenge the 2020 election results.

She said Trump should "continue to fight" the 2020 election results because Americans were questioning the "sanctity of our elections."


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Election worker testifies that conspiracy theorists tried to citizen's arrest her grandmother after lies from Trump, Giuliani

Wandrea "Shaye" Moss, a former Georgia election worker, is comforted by her mother Ruby Freeman, right, as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol continues to reveal its findings of a year-long investigation
Wandrea "Shaye" Moss, a former Georgia election worker, is comforted by her mother Ruby Freeman, right, during the House January 6 committee's hearing.AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

A Georgia election worker testified that her grandmother faced a citizen's arrest by a group of election deniers who tried pushing their way into her house due to election lies told by former President Donald Trump and former personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani.

Wandrea "Shaye" Moss, an election worker in Fulton County, Georgia, told lawmakers during a January 6 select committee hearing that she and her mother Ruby Freeman, who worked as a short-term election worker in 2020, were among the workers counting ballots at State Farm Arena in Atlanta.

When Giuliani and Trump accused those workers of orchestrating election fraud, Moss said her family faced death threats and were pushed out of town, living in Airbnbs for two months around January 6 at the FBI's recommendation.

Moss said she endured racist harassment as well, adding that a group of people influenced by the election conspiracies showed up to her grandmother's house and tried to perform a citizen's arrest.


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Where's Pat Cipollone?

White House Counsel Pat Cipollone (R) waits for the beginning of a cabinet meeting in the East Room of the White House on May 19, 2020 in Washington, DC. Earlier in the day President Trump met with members of the Senate GOP.
Former White House Counsel Pat CipolloneAlex Wong/Getty Images

Paging Pat Cipollone.

The former White House counsel under then-President Donald Trump is now front and center as a top witness the House committee investigating the January 6 insurrection still wants to hear from.

That's according to Rep. Liz Cheney, who publicly called Tuesday for Cipollone to testify about evidence the committee has collected showing that he "tried to do what was right" as  Trump pushed to overturn the 2020 election.

Cheney also noted that the House panel is also "certain" Trump doesn't want Cipollone to testify. His previous job as Trump's top White House attorney could complicate the matter, though as Insider's Ryan Barber points out in his story, Bill Barr did participate in its investigation.


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Sexualized texts, a break-in and doxxings

Brad Raffensperger, Georgia Secretary of State, is sworn in to testify as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol continues to reveal its findings of a year-long investigation, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, June 21, 2022.
Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger is sworn in to testify on Tuesday before the House select committee investigating the January 6 attack on the US Capitol.Jacquelyn Martin/AP Photo

Tuesday's House select committee featured jaw-dropping testimony from election officials who detailed the threats they faced after refusing to go along with then President Donald Trump's bid to overturn the 2020 election results.

One big dose of it came from Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, who explained how he received texts from all over the US and eventually his wife became a target of harassment too.

"My wife started getting the texts and hers typically came in as sexualized texts, which were disgusting," Raffensperger said during his testimony before the January 6 committee. "You have to understand that Trish and I met in high school and we have been married over 40 years now. They started going after her I think to probably put pressure on me: 'Why don't you just quit and walk away?'"

Raffensperger also testified about Trump supporters who broke into the home of his daughter-in-law, a widow with two children. And he said his phone and email were doxxed, meaning that someone had posted the number and email publicly so that people would message him.


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Death threats

Wandrea ArShaye “Shaye” Moss, a former Georgia election worker, is sworn in before January 6 committee on June 21, 2022.
Wandrea ArShaye “Shaye” Moss, a former Georgia election worker, is sworn in before January 6 committee on June 21, 2022.Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

A Black former Georgia election worker delivered stark testimony on Tuesday about the racist and deadly threats that came when President Donald Trump publicly attacked her and her mother amid his drive to overturn the 2020 election results.

Insider's Bryan Metzger has more on the remarks from Wandrea ArShaye "Shaye" Moss, a veteran election official in Fulton County who ended up on the receiving end of myriad threats after Rudy Giuliani specifically named her and her mom when speaking to the Georgia state Senate.

"They included threats, a lot of threats wishing death upon me," Moss said. "Telling me that, you know, I'll be in jail with my mother, and saying things like, 'Be glad it's 2020 and not 1920.'"


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'We were just kind of useful idiots'

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Former President Donald Trump speaks during a rally in Delaware, Ohio, on April 23, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty Images

"We were just kind of useful idiots, or rubes at that point."

That's a quote from former Donald Trump 2020 campaign staffer Robert Sinner describing to the House January 6 investigators his displeasure with a scheme to overturn now-President Joe Biden's 2020 victory in Georgia.

Sinner's remarks were broadcast in a video recording shown during Tuesday's select committee hearing, Insider's John Dorman reports.


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Suspicious package found outside House hearing room

January 6 committee hearing donald trump
The House panel investigating the January 6 insurrection.Photo by Jabin Botsford-Pool/Getty Images

The House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection kept on going Tuesday despite a suspicious package being found right outside the hearing room where the panel was meeting.

Insider's Lauren Frias reported that the US Capitol Police officials did issue an all-clear about an hour after first sending out its alert. The police advised staff and visitors on the premises to stay away from the area during the incident.

A Fox News producer tweeted that the package appeared to be an unattended backpack on top of a walker outside of the House building.


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'Do not give that to him'

Republican Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin and former Vice President Mike Pence.
Republican Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin and former Vice President Mike Pence.Drew Angerer and Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

GOP Sen. Ron Johnson sought to deliver a slate of "alternate" electors to then-Vice President Mike Pence ahead of the counting of votes during a Joint Session of Congress on January 6, 2021.

That's according to a series of eye-catching text messages first displayed by the January 6 committee on Tuesday, Insider's Bryan Metzger reported.

"Johnson needs to hand something to VPOTUS please advise," Sean Riley, Johnson's chief of staff, wrote of the materials that were related to "alternate" electors from two contested Midwestern states that Democratic nominee Joe Biden had narrowly carried: Michigan and Wisconsin.

"What is it?" replied Chris Hodgson, a legislative aide to Pence.

"Alternate slate of elector for MI and WI because archivist didn't receive them," Riley replied.

"Do not give that to him," Hodgson replied.


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Rudy admitted to not having election fraud evidence

Rudy Giuliani, former lawyer for President Donald Trump, appears on "Meet the Press" in Washington, D.C., Sunday, April 21, 2019.
Rudy Giuliani, former lawyer for President Donald Trump.William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC Newswire/NBCUniversal via Getty Images

Rudy Giuliani admitted to not having any evidence of election fraud after the 2020 presidential election despite repeatedly claiming he did, according to the Republican speaker of the Arizona state House.

"My recollection, he said, 'We've got lots of theories, we just don't have the evidence,'" Russell "Rusty" Bowers, the Arizona official, said in describing a conversation with then-President Donald Trump's personal attorney.

Bowers, a Trump supporter, was testifying on Tuesday before the House January 6 select committee to recount his interactions with Giuliani and the Trump legal team surrounding the events of the last presidential election.

He called the Trump team "a tragic parody" and compared them to the 1971 comedy "The Gang Who Couldn't Shoot Straight."


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A very real threat to the 2022 midterms

Griffin, who is a central figure in a New Mexico county’s refusal to certify recent election results based on debunked conspiracy theories about voting machines, has avoided more jail time for joining the mob that attacked the U.S. Capitol.
Couy Griffin, a central figure in a New Mexico county's refusal to certify recent election results based on debunked conspiracy theories about voting machines, has avoided more jail time for joining the mob that attacked the US Capitol.AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe

The House select committee's January 6 hearings have spotlighted the very real threat to future US elections, including the midterms coming up this November.

That's the big takeaway from a story by Insider's Grace Panetta published Tuesday that looks at how a court had to intercede after New Mexico county commission initially refused to certify results from the state's June 7 primary.

"The election denial movement pushed by Trump and his allies that spurred so many to attack the Capitol on January 6 has now fanned out to county commissions, town halls, and polling places around the country, presenting wholly novel burdens on election officials and new threats to the health of American democracy," Grace wrote.


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Trump is ready to abandon attorney John Eastman after he was criticized in committee hearings, report says

John Eastman with smiling Rudy
John Eastman at a pro-Trump rally on January 6, 2021.Jim Bourg/Reuters

Former President Donald Trump sees no reason to defend the conservative attorney John Eastman, Rolling Stone reported.

The decision the outlet relayed came in light of the heavy scrutiny of Eastman in the Congressional Jan. 6 committee hearings, which detailed his role helping Trump try to overturn the 2020 election.

Eastman wrote a memo detailing a last-ditch plan for Vice President Mike Pence to block Joe Biden's certification as president on January 6, 2021, at the Congressional proceeding which was interrupted by the Capitol riot.

Citing two sources close to Trump, the outlet reported that the committee's focus on Eastman in its public hearings had bothered Trump, and that Trump has started distancing himself from the attorney.


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Full list of witness testifying on June 21

Rusty Bowers
Arizona House Speaker Rusty Bowers is among those scheduled to testify in the committee's June 21 hearing.AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File

Insider's Warren Rojas has a roster of those scheduled to appear in the committee's public hearings. See the full list below.


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Jan. 6 committee subpoenas filmmaker who interviewed Trump before and after the riot

An image of Trump at The Ellipse on January 6, 2021.
Trump speaks to supporters from the Ellipse near the White House on January 6, 2021, in Washington, DC.Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

The January 6 committee sent a subpoena to Alex Holder, a documentary filmmaker who interviewed Trump before and after the Capitol riot, Politico's Playbook newsletter reported Tuesday.

The existence of this footage had never been reported before, and Holder is expected to fully cooperate with the panel, Playbook reported.

Holder also spent several months interviewing members of Trump's family, including his children Donald Trump Jr., Ivanka Trump, and Eric Trump, and his son-in-law Jared Kushner, Playbook reported.

The subpoena asked Holder to provide any raw footage he might have from the Capitol riot and interviews with Trump, his family, and former Vice President Mike Pence, as well as any footage he has of discussions about voter fraud in the 2020 election.

Trump boasts he's been impeached twice and screams 'nothing matters!' amid ongoing January 6 hearings

Donald Trump
Former President Donald Trump gives the keynote address at the Faith and Freedom Coalition during their annual conference on June 17, 2022, in Nashville, Tennessee.Seth Herald/Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump on Friday bragged that he was impeached twice, while recycling his false claims about the 2020 election and attacking former Vice President Mike Pence and former Attorney General William Barr.

Delivering a speech to the Faith and Freedom Coalition in Nashville, the former president said Pence didn't have the courage to embrace his effort to overturn the election and mocked Barr for being "afraid" of getting impeached.

"What's wrong with being impeached? I got impeached twice and my poll numbers went up," Trump said.


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Ginni Thomas says she 'can't wait' to talk to Jan. 6 committee after it asks for interview over her efforts to overturn 2020 election

An image of Virginia Thomas, wife of SCOTUS judge Clarence Thomas
Ginni ThomasChip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Ginni Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, said she "can't wait' to talk to the House January 6 commission after it asked to interview her over her efforts to overturn the 2020 election.

"I can't wait to clear up misconceptions. I look forward to talking to them," Thomas told the right-wing news site The Daily Caller. She did not say what those misconceptions might be.

Her comments come after the House Select Committee investigating the Capitol riot announced that it had requested an interview with her. Rep. Bennie Thompson, the committee's chairman, said the panel wanted to talk to her "soon," Axios reported.

Thomas faces scrutiny over her connections to former President Donald Trump's attempts to overturn the 2020 election.


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Even on the day of the Capitol riot, Rudy Giuliani was still doubtful if Mike Pence had the power to overturn the election, says ex-Trump lawyer

Rudy Giuliani
Rudy Giuliani.Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Eric Herschmann, a former Trump White House lawyer, revealed on Thursday that even on the morning of the Capitol riot, Rudy Giuliani was still debating whether then-Vice President Mike Pence had the power to overturn the votes in the 2020 election.

Herschmann's testimony was aired on Thursday during the third of six public hearings organized by the January 6 committee investigating the Capitol riot. Thursday's session centered on the pressure exerted by the Trump camp in a bid to get Pence to overturn the vote.

Herschmann said he received a call "out of the blue" from Giuliani on the morning of January 6, 2021, concerning what Pence's role would be that day.

"And, you know, he was asking me my view and analysis and then the practical implications of it," Herschmann said, who described the call as an "intellectual discussion." "And when we finished, he said, like, 'I believe that, you know, you're probably right.'"


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Mike Pence's former lawyer said he warned Trump's camp that overturning votes would lead to the 2020 election being 'decided in the streets'

Donald Trump Mike Pence
Then-US President Donald Trump arrives with then- Vice President Mike Pence for a "Make America Great Again" rally in Michigan on November 2, 2020.PhoPhoto by Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty Images

A lawyer for former Vice President Mike Pence said that he strongly disagreed with conservative lawyer John Eastman about the Trump camp's plan to overturn the 2020 election result and warned Eastman that it might lead to violence in the streets.

Testifying on Thursday before the January 6 panel investigating the Capitol riot, Greg Jacob said he had spoken to Eastman on January 5, 2021. During their conversation, Jacob said he expressed his "vociferous disagreement" with the plan for Pence to overturn the electoral vote on behalf of former President Donald Trump and send the votes back to their respective states.

"Among other things, if the courts did not step in to resolve this, there was nobody else to resolve it," Jacob testified.


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Democracy on the brink

People taking their seats before the third public hearing of the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol.
People arrive before a hearing of the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, June 16, 2022.Drew Angerer/Pool Photo via AP

American democracy was on the brink like no time ever before.

That's the lede paragraph from Insider's Grace Panetta in her story that sums up the biggest takeaways from Thursday's historic and marathon third public hearing of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection at the US Capitol.

Grace writes that the two lead witnesses, Greg Jacob and Michael Luttig, were steeped in legal expertise and constitutional scholarship as they explained at a granular and methodical level why neither the Electoral Count Act nor the 12th Amendment permitted then-Vice President Mike Pence to unilaterally reject Electoral College votes for President-elect Joe Biden.

Then-President Donald Trump and one of his personal legal advisors, John Eastman, were pushing the vice president to do exactly that in a break with all of US history.


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MAGA world a "clear and present danger to American democracy"

Retired federal judge Michael Luttig looks on as force Mike Pence advisor Greg Jacob testifies at a House select committee hearing on the January 6, 2021, insurrection at the US Capitol.
Michael Luttig, a retired federal judge who was an adviser to former Vice President Mike Pence, looks at Greg Jacob, former counsel to Vice President Mike Pence, as he testifies before the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021 attack on the Capitol at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, June 16, 2022.J. Scott Applewhite/AP Photo

Former President Donald Trump and his supporters remain a "clear and present danger to American democracy."

Those were the startling words of Michael Luttig, a retired federal judge who has long been championed by Republicans. He made them near the end of Thursday's marathon House select committee hearing into the January 6, 2021, insurrection at the US Capitol.

Luttig, who advised then-Vice President Mike Pence about his ceremonial role on January 6, also went on to say Trump world is being more than blunt about its plans to manipulate the results of the next election for the White House.

"The former president and his allies are executing that blueprint for 2024 in open and plain view of the American public," Luttig testified, per Insider's Warren Rojas.


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'1 more relatively minor violation' of election law...please?

John Eastman
Former Trump legal adviser John EastmanAP Photo/Susan Walsh

It's perhaps one of the biggest bombshells to come out of Thursday's House select committee hearing on the Capitol insurrection: a Trump lawyer putting in writing a request to break the law.

The no-no came from John Eastman, who sent an email at 11:44 p.m. on the night of January 6, 2021, repeated his demand that Vice President Mike Pence halt the proceedings to certify the 2020 election and send it back to the states for a period of 10 days.

"So now that the precedent has been set that the Electoral Count Act is not quite so sacrosanct as was previously claimed, I implore you to consider one more relatively minor violation and adjourn for 10 days to allow the legislatures to finish their investigations, as well as to allow a full forensic audit of the massive amount of illegal activity that has occurred here," Eastman wrote to Pence lawyer Greg Jacob.

Insider's Jake Lahut writes that the Eastman email was sent after Jacob and the then-vice president's staff and family, had been sheltering in place in a secure location during the riot.


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Eastman asked Giuliani to be added to Trump's pardon list

John Eastman with smiling Rudy
John Eastman appeared onstage with Rudy Giuliani at the pro-Trump rally that preceded the January 6 attack on the Capitol.Jim Bourg/Reuters

The House panel investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection at the Capitol made some news on Thursday by disclosing evidence that conservative lawyer John Eastman wanted to get added to lame-duck President Donald Trump's pardon list.

Eastman was pushing to overturn the 2020 election, and as Insider's Oma Seddiq reports, his efforts prompted an email to personal Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani.

"I've decided I should be on the pardon list, if that is still in the works," Eastman wrote  to Giuliani, according to Rep. Pete Aguilar, a lawmaker on the January 6 panel who read the email during Thursday's hearing.

Eastman ultimately did not receive a pardon.


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Aides say Trump called Pence 'P-word' and 'wimp' on Jan. 6 call

Trump and Pence at a White House event on July 13, 2020.
Trump and Pence at a White House event on July 13, 2020.AP Photo/Evan Vucci

The language got pretty profane in the White House on the morning of January 6, 2021, Insider's Bryan Metzger reports.

That's according to former aides who testified to the House select committee investigating the Capitol insurrection about a call then-President Donald Trump made to Mike Pence, his vice president.

"I remember hearing the word 'wimp'. Either he called him a wimp — I don't remember if he said, 'you are a wimp, you'll be a wimp' — wimp is the word I remember," said Nicholas Luna, a former assistant to Trump.

Julie Radford, who served as Ivanka Trump's chief of staff, told the committee that Ivanka told her that the president "just had an upsetting conversation with the Vice President" in which he called Pence "the P-word."


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'Secret' MAGA back channel Jan. 6 investigators are teasing is also Oath Keepers' legal defense

Stewart Rhodes, founder of the citizen militia group known as the Oath Keepers speaks during a rally outside the White House in Washington, on June 25, 2017.
Stewart Rhodes, founder of the citizen militia group known as the Oath Keepers speaks during a rally outside the White House in Washington, on June 25, 2017.Susan Walsh/AP

The House January 6 investigators keep on teasing how there'll soon be upcoming testimony that reveals secret coordination between Trumpworld and extremist groups.

But as Insider's Laura Italiano points out in a new story, the Oath Keepers have long boasted of such a back channel.

In fact, leader and founder Elmer Stewart Rhodes and other members of the pro-Trump militia are staking their seditious-conspiracy defense case on these yet-described communications with rally organizers.


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Cruz wanted the ex-judge testifying against Trump as a SCOTUS justice

Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas and retired Judge Michael Luttig.
Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas and retired Judge Michael Luttig.AP Photos/Manuel Balce Ceneta and Susan Walsh

There's an interesting twist to the retired conservative federal Judge Michael Luttig testifying as a key witness in Thursday's January 6 committee hearing.

Insider's Bryan Metzger dug up video from the 2016 GOP presidential primary debates showing Luttig was once named by Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas as an ideal Supreme Court nominee.

 

Bryan writes that it was "yet another example of just how much former President Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 presidential election results has divided the conservative legal world."


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DOJ: House's 'failure' to share transcripts hurting Jan. 6 investigations

Capitol attack
Trump supporters clash with police and security forces as people try to storm the Capitol on January 6, 2021 in Washington.Brent Stirton/Getty Images

More public tension is emerging between the Justice Department and the House panel investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection at the US Capitol.

Insider's Ryan Barber has the details on a new letter sent Wednesday from the top US attorney in Washington DC to the House panel. There, the DOJ official says that the House panel has complicated criminal cases with its 'failure' to turn over interview transcripts to prosecutions.

DOJ is looking for access to more than 1,000 interviews the congressional panel has conducted during its months-long examination of the Capitol attack and former President Donald Trump's effort to overturn the 2020 election.


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Judge Luttig: If Pence tossed valid electoral votes it would have been 'a revolution'

J. Michael Luttig
Michael Luttig, a retired federal judge who was an adviser to former Vice President Mike Pence, testifies Thursday to the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol.AP Photo/Susan Walsh

Some really powerful testimony to start Thursday's January 6 select committee hearing from former federal judge J. Michael Luttig.

In his opening remarks, he told the panel investigating the insurrection at the US Capitol that Vice President Mike Pence overturning the 2020 election would've pushed the country into 'the first constitutional crisis since the founding of the republic.'

"That declaration of Donald Trump as the next president would have launched America into what I believe would have been tantamount to a revolution within a constitutional crisis in America which in my view would have been the first constitutional crisis since the founding of the Republic," Luttig told lawmakers during a hearing Thursday.


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Former Pence counsel says 'the law is not a plaything' for presidents

Vice President Mike Pence returns to the House chamber after midnight, Jan. 7, 2021, to finish the work of the Electoral College after a mob loyal to President Donald Trump stormed the Capitol in Washington and disrupted the process.
Vice President Mike PenceScott J. Applewhite/AP

Mike Pence's former counsel Greg Jacob is a lead witness in Thursday's third public hearing for the House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection at the US Capitol.

In his written statement submitted before the hearing, Jacob called serving the vice president "the honor of a lifetime," while also warning that the rule of law is "not a plaything" for political leaders to bend per their whim.

"The law is not a plaything for presidents or judges to use to remake the world in their preferred image," he wrote. "Our Constitution and our laws form the strong edifice within which our heartfelt policy disagreements are to be debated and decided."

Insider's Grace Panetta has more on Jacob's testimony and spells out why he was a key figure in rebuffing the intense pressure campaign and efforts to compel Pence to obstruct or meddle with the count.


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January 6 committee says it will 'soon' seek interview with Ginni Thomas

Conservative activist Ginni Thomas and January 6 committee chair Rep. Bennie Thompson of Mississippi.
Conservative activist Ginni Thomas and January 6 committee chair Rep. Bennie Thompson of Mississippi.AP Photos/Susan Walsh and J. Scott Applewhite

Conservative activist Ginni Thomas, the wife of conservative Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, should be expecting an interview request soon from the House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection at the US Capitol.

"We think it's time that we, at some point, invite her to come talk to the committee," Rep. Bennie Thompson, the Democratic chair of the panel, told Axios' Andrew Solender. He added that the invitation would come "soon."

Thomas has recently come under scrutiny for her role in seeking to overturn the 2020 election, including emailing Trump lawyer John Eastman and pressuring 29 state legislators in Arizona to overturn the state's 2020 election results.


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Meet the former Trump attorney starring in the January 6 hearing

Eric Herschmann
Eric Herschmann, former White House attorney, speaks with the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 13, 2022.(House Select Committee via AP

Anyone remember Eric Herschmann? The White House attorney burst into the national spotlight defending President Donald Trump during his first Senate impeachment trial way back in the early pre-pandemic days of 2020.

Now he's back, but for a very different reason.

That's the story that Oma Seddiq just delivered for Insider readers ahead of Thursday's House January 6 hearing profiling Herschmann. He's been in the news as video clips make the rounds of his testimony where he talks about warning Trump and his allies after the presidential election that there was no proof the race was rigged and stolen, and their efforts may be illegal.

In addition to his colorful language, Herschmann has drawn notice because he gave his deposition in a room with a baseball bat hanging on the wall and the word "JUSTICE" inscribed on it in bold, white letters. Observers also have noted a large painting behind him of a panda, by the artist Rob Pruitt, is similar to one that appeared in the 2015 erotic drama "50 Shades of Grey."


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Nick Quested explains how it felt to testify before the January 6 committee

Nick Quested at the first January 6 committee hearing
British filmmaker Nick Quested testifies as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol holds its first public hearing to reveal the findings of a year-long investigation, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 9, 2022.Andrew Harnik/AP Photo

As a rap music video creator-turned-documentary filmmaker, Nick Quested is used to being behind the cameras, not in front of them.

But among the hundreds of journalists, filmmakers, and people with cameras at the January 6, 2021, attack on the US Capitol riot, the US House's January 6 select committee thrust Quested alone into the prime-time spotlight as one of its first public hearing witnesses.

Check out this great interview Insider's Madison Hall did with Quested, where he described an intense lead-up to his testimony last week including sitting for 7 hours of interviews with members of House select committee and their investigative counsel.

"Imagine it's like going to a seven-hour oral exam, except you're the chosen subject so you've got lots to talk about," Quested said. "And if you make a mistake, you go to jail."

He also joked Wednesday that he was chosen for the public hearing because "everyone trusts a British accent."


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Trump attorney: SCOTUS would take election case if it feared 'wild' Jan 6

Security works by fencing outside the Supreme Court, Wednesday, June 15, 2022, in Washington
Security works by fencing outside the Supreme Court, Wednesday, June 15, 2022, in WashingtonAP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

A Trump campaign lawyer wrote in emails in late 2020 that the possibility of "wild chaos" on January 6, 2021, could pressure the Supreme Court to take up a case that could overturn the presidential election, The New York Times reported Thursday.

The December 24, 2020 email exchange between the Trump attorney, Kenneth Chesebro, and conservative lawyer John Eastman, included a discussion of the possibility that the Trump campaign could get a last-minute lawsuit challenging the election results in Wisconsin before the Supreme Court.

Eastman also claimed to have inside knowledge of "a heated fight underway" between the justices over election cases.


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The next January 6 committee hearing is due on Thursday, with Pence advisors set to testify

Former Vice President Mike Pence wearing a gray suit and gray tie, speaking at a lectern
Former Vice President Mike Pence.Meg Kinnard/AP

The next hearing by the January 6 committee is due to take place on Thursday at 1 p.m. ET.

Two advisors to Mike Pence, who was former President Donald Trump's vice president, are due to testify.

The aides are Greg Jacob, Pence's former counsel, and J. Michael Luttig, a retired judge for the US Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit who served as an informal advisor to Pence.

Two people familiar with Luttig's testimony told CBS News that he is expected to say tht America's democracy was "almost stolen" and that conservatives should recognize the seriousness of what Trump did on January 6.

He will also say that he urged Pence to ignore Trump's pressure on the vice president to block Joe Biden's certification as president, CBS News reported.

Trump had piled pressure on Pence not to recognize Biden's victory in the days running up to January 6, 2021, and some of the rioters at the Capitol had chanted "hang Mike Pence." Pence's role in the certification process was largely ceremonial.

All the times GOP Rep. Loudermilk shifted his story about the Capitol tour he led a day before Jan. 6 attack

Video released by the January 6 committee shows Republican Rep. Barry Loudermilk of Georgia leading a tour through the Capitol complex on January 5, 2021.
Video released by the January 6 committee shows Republican Rep. Barry Loudermilk of Georgia leading a tour through the Capitol complex on January 5, 2021.Screenshot / January 6 Committee

The explanation given by Republican Rep. Barry Loudermilk about a tour that he led a day before the January 6 Capitol riot has changed several times.

The committee investigating the attack said Wednesday at least one person on the tour later attended Trump's January 6 rally and march toward the Capitol. Other tour members appear to have taken photos of stairwells and a security station in the Capitol complex.

There is currently no evidence that suggests any of the tour participants rioted inside the Capitol. There is also no evidence that suggests that Loudermilk knew any of the people on the tour wanted to commit violence or deface the Capitol.

The January 6 committee released footage of the tour on Wednesday, saying it included areas that tourists don't typically pay much attention to, like stairwells and hallways.

Capitol police said there was nothing "suspicious" about the tour, but Loudermilk's explanation of it has evolved.Read Full Story

Ginni Thomas emailed Trump lawyer John Eastman ahead of January 6, report says

Ginni Thomas
Ginni Thomas, the wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, arrives to watch Judge Amy Coney Barrett take the constitutional oath on the South Lawn of the White House on October 26, 2020.AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

Ginni Thomas, wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, exchanged emails with John Eastman, a Trump lawyer who drafted a memo detailing a plan for overturning the 2020 election, The Washington Post reported Wednesday.

Sources close to the House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection told the Post that the correspondence, which was obtained by the committee, showed Ginni Thomas went to greater lengths than previously known to overturn the election.

A spokesman for Rep. Bennie Thompson, co-chair of the committee, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Other reports have emerged of efforts by Ginni Thomas, a right-wing activist, to overturn the election. The Post previously reported she had emailed 29 GOP lawmakers in Arizona urging them to ignore Biden's win in the state and choose pro-Trump electors.Read Full Story

Police say tour of Capitol complex given by GOP lawmaker on eve of the January 6 attack was not suspicious

Barry Loudermilk, R-Ga., arrives for the House Republican Conference caucus meeting at the Capitol Hill Club in Washington on Wednesday, April 27, 2022.
Rep. Barry Loudermilk.Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

The Capitol Police chief confirmed in a letter on Monday that GOP Rep. Barry Loudermilk of Georgia had given 15 people a tour of the Capitol complex on the eve of the January 6 attack, adding that it was not suspicious.

Chief J. Thomas Manger also said that the group didn't enter the Capitol building in his letter to Rep. Rodney Davis of Illinois, the ranking Republican member of the House Administration committee.

"We train our officers on being alert for people conducting surveillance or reconnaissance, and we do not consider any of the activities we observed as suspicious," Manger wrote.

Citing security footage, Manger said that Loudermilk had led a group of 12 people, which later grew to 15, through the Rayburn, Cannon, and Longworth buildings, but the group never appeared at "any tunnels that would have led them to the US Capitol."


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Heiress to Publix grocery chain sponsored Kimberly Guilfoyle's $60,000 speech on Jan. 6 that lasted 2 minutes, report says

Kimberly Guilfoyle gives an address to the Republican National Convention on August 24, 2020 in Washington, DC.
Kimberly Guilfoyle gives an address to the Republican National Convention on August 24, 2020 in Washington, DC.Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The daughter of the Publix grocery chain's founder sponsored the January 6, 2021, speech given by Kimberly Guilfoyle, which lasted two-and-a-half minutes and cost $60,000, The Washington Post reported.

Guilfoyle, a former Fox News host who went on to work for former President Donald Trump and is now Donald Trump Jr.'s fiancée, was given $60,000 for the speech by the conservative nonprofit Turning Point Action, The Post reported, citing two sources with knowledge of the matter.

The sponsoring donor for that payment was Julie Fancelli, the daughter of Publix founder George Jenkins, The Post reported.

Guilfoyle's speech was at a Trump rally in Washington, DC, which preceded the Capitol riot.


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Mike Lindell says he offered to publicly testify before the January 6 committee but they didn't want to talk to him

An image of MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell grinning and giving a thumbs-up
Mike Lindell, political activist and CEO of MyPillow, attends a rally hosted by former President Donald Trump at the Delaware County Fairgrounds on April 23, 2022 in Delaware, Ohio.Drew Angerer/Getty Images

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell says that he tried to get a spot to testify before the January 6 committee and show them his "evidence" to prove former President Donald Trump's baseless claims of voter fraud, but they did not want to talk to him.

Lindell made this statement during an appearance on Steve Bannon's podcast, "War Room: Pandemic."

Bannon asked Lindell if the committee had reached out to him to go through "all the voluminous material" he has about the 2020 election.

"No, they haven't. And it's really — that's sad, too, because I've offered. I'd love to come to your committee as long as you nationally televise it, Ms. Pelosi," Lindell replied, referring to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.


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Sen. Raphael Warnock says that January 6 Capitol attack shows that 'our democracy is in peril'

Suit-clad Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock of Georgia speaks to reporters while standing against a backdrop of American flags at the US Capitol.
Democratic Sen. Raphael Warnock of Georgia speaks to members of the press after a Senate Democratic Caucus meeting on January 18, 2022 in Washington, DC.Alex Wong/Getty Images

Sen. Raphael Warnock, a Democrat in Georgia, told NPR that democracy in the US is at risk.

Warnock, who is running for reelection against Republican Herschel Walker, serves as Georgia's first Black senator since his election in 2021. He is also a pastor at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, the church where Martin Luther King Jr. attended.

"Democracy is hard work. Democracy is not a noun, it's a verb. And over the course of time, our democracy expands. It gets a little closer towards those ideals. There are moments when it contracts, but even contractions open the possibility for new birth and new hope," Warnock said to NPR's Mary Louise Kelly.

Warnock said that the January 6 Capitol attack, in which hundreds of rioters breached the US Capitol in an effort to overturn the 2020 election, demonstrates the troubled state of democracy.


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Trump might have to be prosecuted to save American democracy, an expert on authoritarianism argues

Trump
Former President Donald Trump speaks on May 28, 2022 in Casper, Wyoming.Chet Strange/Getty Images

Ruth Ben-Ghiat spends a lot of time thinking about authoritarianism. An historian at New York University, she is an expert on the rise of fascism in Italy and, most recently, author of the the book, "Strongmen: Mussolini to the Present," tracing the erosion of democracy from Russia to the United States of America.

She is keenly focused on what happens when those in power lose their grip on it.

"The authoritarian playbook has no chapter on failure," Ben-Ghiat wrote in a November 2020 piece for The Washington Post. "Nothing prepares the ruler to see his propaganda ignored and his charismatic hold weaken until his own people turn against him."

When, two months later, former President Donald Trump urged his supporters to head over to the US Capitol in a last-ditch effort to overturn the 2020 election, Ben-Ghiat was not altogether surprised. Indeed, she had told people to expect it, arguing: "the rage that will grow in Trump as reality sinks in may make for a rocky transition to Biden's presidency. Americans would do well to be prepared."

What stopped a failed insurrection from being a successful coup, she recently told CNN, was — at least in part — one of the lies Trump said on January 6: "I'll be there with you," he told supporters as they prepared to march on Congress.

He never showed.

In an interview with Insider, Ben-Ghiat expanded on why she thinks January 6 was an "attempted coup," why it did not succeed, and what the future holds.


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Conservative lawyer John Eastman was told to 'get a great f-ing criminal defense lawyer': House January 6 testimony

John Eastman testifies before the House Ways and Means Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 4, 2013.
John Eastman testifies before the House Ways and Means Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 4, 2013.Charles Dharapak/AP

Conservative lawyer John Eastman previously wrote a memo to former Vice President Mike Pence urging him to overturn the 2020 election results.

White House lawyer Eric Herschmann told Eastman to "get a great f-ing criminal defense lawyer" the day after the Capitol attack.

"You're going to need it," Herschmann recounted to the January 6 House committee.

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Trump releases 12-page statement bashing the Jan. 6 investigation, saying it is merely to stop him from running for president again

trump jan 6 committee
Video of former President Donald Trump is played during a hearing by the Select Committee in Washington, DC, on June 13, 2022.Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump released a 12-page statement after the committee's second hearing on Monday.

He spent nearly nine pages of the statement pushing bogus claims that the 2020 election was rigged against him.

He also bashed the panel and claimed it was trying to stop him from running again in 2024. He has repeatedly teased a 2024 run for president.


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Rudy Giuliani pushes back on testimony that he was drunk on election night 2020, says he was drinking Diet Coke

Rudy Giuliani
Rudy Giuliani.Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Rudy Giuliani responded to claims that he was drunk on election night 2020 in a tweet on Monday night, insisting he "was drinking diet coke all night."

The claim about the former New York City mayor's behavior at the White House election night party resurfaced during Monday's January 6 committee hearings.

In a taped deposition, former advisor to then-President Donald Trump Jason Miller said: "I think the mayor was definitely intoxicated, but I do not know his level of intoxication when he spoke with the president, for example."

After, Giuliani's media office tweeted about his drinking Diet Coke, attributing the claim to an unnamed "fellow guest."


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Jan. 6 committee members push back on chair Bennie Thompson's claim that they won't ask the DOJ to indict Trump

Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., speaks as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol holds its first public hearing to reveal the findings of a year-long investigation, on Capitol Hill, Thursday, June 9, 2022, in Washington.
Rep. Bennie Thompson at the Jan. 6 committee's first public hearing on June 9, 2022.Andrew Harnik/AP

Rep. Bennie Thompson, chair of the January 6 committee, said it was not the group's job to refer Trump or anyone else to the Justice Department for charges.

"No, that's not our job," Thompson said on Monday, according to CNN. "Our job is to look at the facts and circumstances around January 6, what caused it and make recommendations after that."

But some committee members disagreed with that approach, showing rare public cracks within the committee.

"The January 6th Select Committee has not issued a conclusion regarding potential criminal referrals. We will announce a decision on that at an appropriate time," tweeted Rep. Liz Cheney, a Republican serving as the committee's vice chair.

And Rep. Adam Schiff, a Democrat, told CNN's Anderson Cooper on Monday that he had not seen Thompson's comment but was not aware a decision on referrals had been made yet.


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Rudy Giuliani continued to make false claims to the January 6 panel that if they gave him 'the paper ballots,' he could overturn Biden's victory

Rudy Giuliani
Rudy Giuliani continued to make false claims about election fraud during his testimony to the January 6 panel.Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Trump-allied lawyer Rudy Giuliani continued to make bizarre false claims about voter fraud in the 2020 election during his testimony to the January 6 panel, claiming he had evidence of a "big truck" of fraudulently-cast Biden votes.

Giuliani's testimony to the House panel investigating the Capitol riot was aired on Monday, during the second of the committee's six public hearings on January 6. The former New York mayor doubled down on outlandish and unproven election fraud claims.

"They saw a big truck bringing in 100,000 ballots in garbage cans, in wastepaper baskets, in cardboard boxes, and in shopping baskets," Giuliani claimed without substantiation.


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Former AG Bill Barr says Trump was fixated on 'crazy' voter fraud allegations and had no interest 'in what the actual facts were'

Bill Barr and Donald Trump
Former Attorney General Bill Barr and former President Donald TrumpDrew Angerer/Getty Images

Former Attorney General William Barr said that former President Donald Trump was more fixated on "crazy" allegations of voter fraud than knowing the "actual facts" on the matter.

Barr's testimony to the House panel investigating the January 6 Capitol riot was aired on Monday as part of the second of the committee's six public hearings on their investigation.

In a videotaped deposition, Barr recounted a meeting with Trump on December 14, 2020. Barr said Trump "went off on a monologue" during the meeting about what he claimed to be "definitive evidence" of election fraud being carried out via the Dominion voting machines.

According to Barr, Trump then "held up the report" and claimed it showed "absolute proof that the Dominion machines were rigged." Barr added that Trump then declared that the report meant that he would have a second term.


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Trump campaign lawyer says Trump aide Peter Navarro accused him of being 'an agent of the deep state' for questioning baseless Dominion voter fraud conspiracy theories

Director of Trade and Manufacturing Policy Peter Navarro speaks to members of the press outside the West Wing of the White House June 18, 2020 in Washington, DC. Navarro spoke on former National Security Adviser John Bolton’s new book “The Room Where It Happened.”
Former Trump aide Peter NavarroAlex Wong/Getty Images

Alex Cannon, a former Trump campaign lawyer, testified in front of the House Committee on January 6 and said that Trump aide Peter Navarro accused him of being a "deep state" operative because he expressed doubt over Dominion voting machine conspiracy theories.

Cannon's testimony was broadcast on Monday as part of the second of six public hearings on the committee's investigation.

During his deposition, Cannon said that he had a conversation with Navarro in mid-November, after the 2020 presidential election, about voter fraud allegations.

Cannon said he spoke to Navarro specifically regarding the conspiracy theory that Dominion voting machines were used to flip votes from Trump to Biden. This conspiracy has continually been pushed by Trump-allied lawyers Sidney Powell and Rudy Giuliani, as well as MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell. Dominion named all three in a $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit.


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Trump campaign chief says the Trump team was split into two halves after election night — 'Team Normal' and 'Team Giuliani'

A stitched image of Bill Stepien and Rudy Giuliani
Former Trump campaign chief Bill Stepien (left) says he did not mind being called part of "Team Normal," as opposed to "Team Giuliani".Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images; Matias J. Ocner/Miami Herald/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Former Trump campaign chief Bill Stepien says the Trump team was split into two camps after the election – "Team Normal" and "Team Giuliani."

The House Select Committee to Investigate January 6 played a clip of Stepien's testimony on Monday during the second of the committee's six public hearings. During his deposition, Stepien was asked if he had pulled back from the Trump camp to preserve his professional reputation.

"You didn't want to be associated with some of what you were hearing from the Giuliani team and others that — that sort of stepped in in the wake of your departure?" an unidentified questioner asked Stepien.

"I didn't mind being categorized. There were two groups of them. We called them kind of my team and Rudy's team. I — I didn't mind being characterized as being part of Team Normal, as — as reporters, you know, kind of started to do around that point in time," Stepien said.


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Fired Fox News political editor said television news as entertainment has 'really damaged' Americans' capacity to be 'good citizens'

Chris Stirewalt sits at a microphone.
Chris Stirewalt, former Fox News political editor, testifies as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol continues to reveal its findings of a year-long investigation, at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, June 13, 2022.AP Photo/Susan Walsh

Former Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt said he was surprised by the internal firestorm that erupted at his former workplace after Fox became the first major news network to call Arizona for President Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election.

Stirewalt, who was fired from Fox in January 2021, testified before the January 6 committee investigating the Capitol riot on Monday, telling lawmakers that former President Donald Trump's chance at victory was virtually zero after most networks called the election for Biden on November 7, 2020.

Trump was reportedly enraged that Fox News's decision desk called the swing state of Arizona for Biden before most other outlets did the same, but Stirewalt said he was confident in his team's work. Biden ultimately won the state by about 11,000 votes.

But what Stirewalt wasn't expecting was the wave of backlash at Fox News that followed the accurate projection.

Stirewalt spoke to NPR's David Folkenflik following his Monday testimony, telling the outlet that people close to Trump were hammering Fox executives and anchors to take back their Arizona call.

The ordeal left Stirewalt disillusioned about the state of network news in the US, he told the outlet.

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White House lawyer asked John Eastman a day after January 6: 'Are you out of your effing mind'

Eric Herschmann
Eric D. Herschmann answers a question from a senator during impeachment proceedings against then-President Donald Trump in January 2020.Senate Television via Getty Images

Trump White House lawyer Eric Herschmann confronted a conservative lawyer who pushed Trump's election lies, the day after the Capitol riot, according to a taped deposition the January 6 committee released on Monday.

"I said to him, 'Are you out of your effing mind,'" Herschmann told the committee about his conversation with Eastman. "'I only want to hear two words coming out of your mouth for now on: orderly transition.'"

Eastman was closely involved in then-President Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, including a push to get Vice President Mike Pence to either delay or unilaterally overturn a state's results on January 6.


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There's an 'obvious explanation' for Trump's loss in Pennsylvania — and it's not voter fraud, Barr says

US President Donald Trump (R) and US Attorney General William Barr step off Air Force One upon arrival at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on September 1, 2020
Former Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Former Attorney General Bill Barr laid out his frank assessment of former President Donald Trump's election loss in Pennsylvania during Monday's House Select Committee hearing — and it wasn't voter fraud.

"I think once you actually look at the votes, there's a [sic] obvious explanation," Barr said of Trump's election fraud conspiracy theories. "For example, in Pennsylvania, Trump ran weaker than the Republican ticket generally. He ran weaker than two of the state candidates. He ran weaker than the congressional delegation running for federal Congress."

Trump campaign manager says why he quit

Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien looks at then-US President Donald Trump as he addresses reporters during a flight on Air Force One.
Then-Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien alongside then-US President Donald Trump on August 28, 2020.Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Former Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien said he quit his high-profile job because he felt what unfolded after the 2020 presidential election night was not "honest or professional."

He described a Trump campaign that was becoming increasingly divided because Trump chose to use baseless allegations to claim he hadn't lost the 2020 election.


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Barr said dealing with 'bogus' 2020 voting fraud claims was like 'playing Whac-a-Mole'

Bill Barr and Donald Trump
Former Attorney General Bill Barr and former President Donald TrumpDrew Angerer/Getty Images

Bill Barr said that dealing with baseless claims of voter fraud from Donald Trump's team was like "playing Whac-a-Mole," in testimony played Monday by the House select committee.

Barr described dealing with an "avalanche" of false voter fraud claims from Trump and allies like Rudy Giuliani and Sidney Powell, who became the campaign's primary peddlers of election fraud claims.


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Rudy Giuliani was 'apparently inebriated' when advising Trump on election night

Rudy Giuliani
Rudy Giuliani.Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Trump rejected his campaign advisors' guidance on election night in 2020 and instead relied on counsel from his former personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, who was apparently drunk, Rep. Liz Cheney said Monday.

Campaign aides were advising Trump that the race was too close to call in key battlegrounds, but Trump took Giuliani's advice and just claimed he'd won in an early morning speech.


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Rudy Giuliani pushed Trump to prematurely declare victory on election night

Rudy Giuliani and Donald Trump
Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani looks on as then-President Donald Trump speaks.Joshua Roberts/Getty Images

Former New York Rudy Giuliani pushed then-President Donald Trump to prematurely declare victory on election night 2020, a group of former top Trump aides testified.

Bill Stepien, Trump's final 2020 campaign manager, testified to the House January 6 committee that he urged Trump to strike a measured tone and not to declare victory while votes were being counted.

"Ballots were still being counted, ballots were still going to be counted for days, and it was far too early to be making any proclamation like that," Stepien testified in a previous deposition that was partially aired on Monday.

But Trump rejected the calls of caution and in the early morning after the election did exactly what some of his aides told him not to do.

"Frankly, we did win this election," Trump declared at the White House.


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Fox News' early call for Arizona takes center state at second hearing

Fox News
Images of Fox News personalities appear outside News Corporation headquarters in New York on July 31, 2021.AP Photo/Ted Shaffrey

As the January 6 select committee honed in on Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, Monday's hearing started off with pre-taped depositions of former White House officials on their incensed reaction to Fox News calling Arizona for then-candidate Joe Biden.

Fox News had just introduced a new methodology to its decision desk, which its director, Arnon Mishkin, explained to Insider ahead of Election Day. The network called Arizona before other major TV outlets, and ultimately proved correct in its decision.

Chris Stirewalt, a former Fox News political editor, described the network's decision desk as "the best in the business" in his testimony.

The network's new strategy included surveying upwards of 100,000 Americans ahead of Election Day to see where people were voting by mail or in person, and using that large dataset to make sense of the returns on election night. That allowed Fox to have an assessment of how many remaining votes would be by mail and how those who intended to vote by mail indicated they would vote.

"We already knew Trump's chances were small and getting smaller based on what we'd seen," Stirewalt said.

The second public hearing is due to start Monday morning. Here's who to expect.

Acosta/Stirewalt
The former Fox News editor Chris Stirewalt being interviewed on CNN in September 2021.CNN

The second public hearing by the committee is due to start around 10:30 a.m. ET on Monday.

Witnesses include the former Fox News political editor Chris Stirewalt and the GOP election lawyer Benjamin Ginsberg.

Stirewalt's team correctly called Arizona for Joe Biden in the 2020 election before other networks did so, and subsequently became the target of Trump supporters.

He was fired as a Fox News political editor on January 19, 2021, and now works for NewsNation. It is not clear what the committee plans to ask Stirewalt.

The committee said in a Monday morning update that Bill Stepien, Trump's former campaign manager, was no longer able to appear due to a family emergency. It said Stepien's lawyer would make a statement on the record instead.

Rep. Jamie Raskin declines to share evidence that GOP lawmakers asked Trump for pardons after Capitol riot, says details will come 'in due course'

Rep. Jamie Raskin on CNN on Sunday night.
Rep. Jamie Raskin on CNN on Sunday night.YouTube/CNN

January 6 committee member Rep. Jamie Raskin dodged questions from CNN for evidence that Republican lawmakers asked then-President Donald Trump for pardons after the Capitol riot.

He said the details would emerge later.

When asked by CNN's Dana Bash if he had evidence, Raskin responded: "It is multiple members of Congress, as the vice-chair said at our opening hearing, and all in due course the details will surface," Raskin said, referring to Cheney.

When asked again if he had evidence, he said: "Everything we're doing is documented by evidence ... Everything that we are doing is based on facts and this is a bipartisan investigation which is determined to ferret out all of the facts of what happened."


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GOP governor says many Republicans are quietly seeking an 'off-ramp' from Trump's bogus election-fraud claims

Arkansas governor Asa Hutchinson holds his hand up to be sworn into a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on June 22, 2021.
Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson on June 22, 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson said that much of the Republican Party is looking for an "off-ramp" from former President Donald Trump's bogus theory that the 2020 election was stolen.

Speaking to Fox News host Bret Baier, Hutchinson said Sunday that Trump is "politically and morally responsible" for much of the January 6 riot at the Capitol.

He suggested that many Republicans are looking for alternative leadership as Trump continues to falsely insist on the claim that inspired the riot — that there was widespread election fraud.

"For him to continue to push that theory, I agree is the wrong direction for the Republican Party," said Hutchinson. "I think there's many Republicans that are looking for an off-ramp, new opportunities … to find leadership in the future."

He did not specify whether he meant ordinary GOP voters, or elected officials, mainly of whom have vocally endorsed Trump's claims.


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House Jan. 6 committee members says panel has uncovered enough 'credible evidence' to ask the DOJ to indict Trump

House Jan 6 panel
Lawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The members of the House panel investigating the Capitol riot on Sunday said that the panel has uncovered enough evidence for the Department of Justice to mull a criminal indictment against former President Donald Trump over his efforts to invalidate President Joe Biden's electoral win, according to The Associated Press.

Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff of California, who sits on the panel and also leads the House Intelligence Committee, said that he wanted to see the department examine Trump's efforts in seeking to halt the certification of Biden's victory.

"I would like to see the Justice Department investigate any credible allegation of criminal activity on the part of Donald Trump," he said on ABC News on Sunday. "There are certain actions, parts of these different lines of effort to overturn the election that I don't see evidence the Justice Department is investigating."


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House Jan. 6 committee to focus on Trump's 'dereliction of duty' during Capitol riot at next public hearing, committee member says

An image of Trump at The Ellipse on January 6, 2021.
US President Donald Trump speaks to supporters from The Ellipse near the White House on January 6, 2021, in Washington, DC.Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

The upcoming January 6 committee hearing will focus on a deep dive that former President Donald Trump knew he lost the election but still tried to overturn it and his "dereliction of duty," a committee member said.

Democratic Rep. Elaine Lurie told NBC's "Meet the Press" host Chuck Todd that the upcoming hearing will show how Trump tried to pressure local, state and federal officials to overturn the election, after baselessly claiming it was rigged against him.

"We've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did," The Virginia lawmaker said.

Lurie told Todd that it's more accurate to say that the committee now has a timeline of what Trump was not doing before and during the insurrection than what he was doing.

"There is a gap there that we have tried through these witnesses, we've interviewed a thousand witnesses and a lot of people who work directly in the White House for the president, in his immediate vicinity throughout the day," she said.

"So we've pieced together a very comprehensive tick-tock timeline of what he did."
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Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson calls out Trump, says the former president is 'politically, morally responsible' for the Capitol riot

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson labeled former President Donald Trump as "politically" and "morally responsible" for the Capitol attack.

His comments come after the kick-off of the Jan. 6 committee hearings last week, where officials started sharing their findings of the events of that day — where pro-Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol building in an attempt to halt the certification of President Joe Biden.

During an appearance on "Fox News Sunday," Hutchinson called the hearings "an important review," however, the GOP governor doesn't think Trump is criminally responsible for the insurrection.

"Trump is politically, morally responsible for much of what has happened, but in terms of criminal liability, I think the committee has a long way to go to establish that," Hutchinson said.

 

 

 

A lawyer for Pence told him the day before January 6 that not certifying the election would lead to a loss in court: report

Trump, Pence
Donald Trump and former US Vice President Mike Pence in the Brady Briefing Room at the White House on April 2, 2020, in Washington, DC.MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

A lawyer for former Vice President Mike Pence told him the day before the Capitol Riot that following former President Donald Trump's request to certify the election for him would eventually fail in court, according to a memo obtained by Politico.

Congress was in the process of certifying the 2020 presidential election on January 6, 2021, when Trump supporters who falsely believed the election had been rigged stormed the US Capitol. 

Trump had previously asked Pence to certify the election in his favor, but attorney Greg Jacob told Pence in a memo that doing so would break multiple provisions of the Electoral Count Act.

According to Politico, in the memo, Jacob said the move could fail in the courts or put America in a political crisis where Pence would find himself "in an isolated standoff against both houses of Congress … with no neutral arbiter available to break the impasse."

The attorney will testify publicly in front of the House committee investigating the Capitol riots this week, however, his letter has been known to the committee for months, Politico reported.


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Giuliani defends Trump after January 6 committee points to his attempts to overturn the 2020 presidential election

rudy giuliani
Rudy Giuliani, attorney for US President Donald Trump, speaks at the White House in Washington, DC, on July 1, 2020Jim Watson/Getty Images

Rudy Giuliani, former advisor and personal lawyer to Donald Trump, claimed in an episode of his podcast that the former president had "nothing to do with" the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol.

The episode, released Saturday, was a response to the House select committee's televised hearings related to the investigation into the events of Jan. 6, 2021. On Thursday, the committee released findings that indicated the events of the day were an attempted coup intended to keep former president Trump in power.


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Laura Ingraham says the Jan 6 hearings 'bombed' despite reeling in nearly 20 million views compared to Fox's 3 million

President Donald Trump gives Laura Ingraham a kiss after inviting her on stage during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit at the Palm Beach County Convention Center, Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019, in West Palm Beach, Fla.
President Donald Trump gives Laura Ingraham a kiss after inviting her on stage during the Turning Point USA Student Action Summit at the Palm Beach County Convention Center, Saturday, Dec. 21, 2019, in West Palm Beach, Fla.Luis M. Alvarez/AP

Fox News host Laura Ingraham claimed the January 6 Committee hearing on Thursday "bombed," despite reeling in nearly 20 million viewers.

Fox was the only major news outlet not to carry the hearing live on Thursday evening, which was the House Select Committee on January 6's first major public hearing about the Capitol attack, the efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump knew before and during the attack.

Committee members revealed that Trump and his allies staged "an attempted coup" and funded a misinformation campaign that "provoked the violence on January 6." They also said that Ivanka Trump "accepted" the attorney general's opinion that there was no election fraud, and that several Republican congressmen asked for pardons following January 6.

Ingraham's claim that the hearings "bombed" came as she responded to criticism from The View's Joy Behar.

"Fox News did not carry the January 6 Committee's live hearings last night. Shocker isn't it? But they still had plenty to say about it," Behar said. "The usual suspects, Tucker [Carlson] and Ingraham, dusted off their greatest hits, calling it a witch hunt, saying it's political revenge from Pelosi, and downplayed what happened on the 6th."

Behar added: "There were no commercial breaks last night on either show. So what does that tell you? That Rupert Murdoch is so desperate to keep his viewers away from the hearing, along with those two, that he is willing to lose millions of dollars."

Ingraham swiped back at Behar in a tweet, claiming to have had "two commercial breaks Thursday night." According to PolitiFact, Carlson's and Hannity's shows had no commercial breaks, whereas Ingraham "went to commercial a few times."


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What is the potential penalty if someone is convicted of 'seditious conspiracy'

proud boys enrique tarrio jail
Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio leaves the D.C. Central Detention Facility on January 14, 2022.Evelyn Hockstein/Reuters

Enrique Tarrio and four other members of the Proud Boys were charged this week with seditious conspiracy in what one constitutional expert calls a "textbook case" of sedition, but the charges themselves face an uphill battle in court.

Seditious conspiracy, sometimes referred to as "sedition," is law that first originated in 1789 to prosecute speech critical of the government.


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The public hearings resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ET

House Jan 6 panel
Lawmakers on the House January 6 committee will air the inquiry's findings during a public hearing Thursday.Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The public hearings for the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection resume on Monday, June 13, at 10 a.m. ET.

Catch up on our takeaways of the biggest moments from the first hearing on Thursday, June 9, 2022, and check out the full schedule.

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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Tweets at Matt Gaetz, Lauren Boebert, and Marjorie Taylor Greene wanting to know if they asked for pardons after January 6

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.Drew Angerer/Getty Image

In a Friday tweet storm, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez asked several of her fellow representatives if they'd asked the White House for a pardon following the January 6 attack.

Her remarks came the day after the January 6 House select committee aired its first public hearing — in which GOP co-chair Rep. Liz Cheney alleged that several members of Congress asked for pardons after the insurrection.


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More than 19 million people watched first public hearing

Former US President Donald Trump appears on a screen during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 9, 2022 in Washington, DC.
Former US President Donald Trump appears on a screen during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 9, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty Images

More than 19 million people watched the first public hearing of the congressional committee investigating the January 6 insurrection, The New York Times reported Friday, citing preliminary figures from ratings company Nielsen.

The actual number is higher, The Times noted, as the preliminary tally does not include all networks and streaming services that aired the hearing.

The Thursday hearing aired from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. on broadcast channels and cable news networks — but not on Fox News, which elected to stick its usual programming.

Trump calls William Barr a 'weak and frightened' AG after his January 6 testimony

US President Donald Trump (R) and US Attorney General William Barr step off Air Force One upon arrival at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland on September 1, 2020
Former Attorney General Bill Barr says then-President Donald Trump did not have a "good idea" about what the roles of the DOJ and the President were.Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump on Friday lashed out at William Barr, calling him a "weak and frightened" attorney general and a "coward" after the House January 6 committee aired his testimony debunking Trump's false claims of widespread election fraud.

During Thursday's public hearing, the committee played recorded testimony from Barr in a closed-door interview saying that he didn't agree that the election was "stolen" and that he told Trump the idea was "bullshit."

Trump attacked Barr, his former attorney general, on his social-media platform, Truth Social, saying he "was always being 'played' and threatened by the Democrats and was scared stiff of being Impeached."
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Trump says Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she rejected his stolen 2020 vote claim

Ivanka Trump
Ivanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump said his daughter Ivanka Trump doesn't understand elections after she testified that there was no fraud in the 2020 election.

The committee aired her testimony on Thursday, where she said that she "accepted" former Attorney General Bill Barr finding no evidence that the vote was stolen.

"Ivanka Trump was not involved in looking at, or studying, Election results," Trump wrote on Truth Social Friday. "She had long since checked out and was, in my opinion, only trying to be respectful to Bill Barr and his position as Attorney General (he sucked!)."


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Trump attacks House committee, repeats bogus fraud claims after hearing blamed him for insurrection

Donald Trump speaks at rally in Wyoming
Former President Donald Trump speaks at a rally on May 28, 2022 in Casper, Wyoming.Chet Strange/Getty Images

Former President Donald Trump responded to the first public hearing by criticizing the House committee and repeating his fake voter fraud claims.

"So the Unselect Committee of political HACKS refuses to play any of the many positive witnesses and statements, refuses to talk of the Election Fraud and Irregularities that took place on a massive scale," he shared on Truth Social early Friday morning.

He added: "Our Country is in such trouble!"


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Fox News hosts bragged about not airing the hearing live, and called it a 'smear campaign' against Trump

Tucker Carlson
Tucker Carlson on his show on June 9, 2022.Fox News

Fox News' prime-time shows refused to carry Thursday's hearing, with host Tucker Carlson bragging about the network's decision.

"The whole thing is insulting. In fact, it's deranged," Carlson said. "And we're not playing along."

"This is the only hour on an American news channel that will not be carrying their propaganda live. They are lying, and we are not going to help them do it," he said, apparently referring to those investigating the riot.

Host Sean Hannity on his own show called the hearing a "multi-hour Democratic fundraiser," without offering any evidence, and a "made-for-TV smear campaign against President Trump featuring sliced and diced video that fits their pre-determined political narrative."

And host Laura Ingraham painted the hearing as boring, saying: "In the end, this was nearly two hours of an unsuccessful, laborious attempt to connect the dots back to Trump, to Trump to a coup that never happened."


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Trump's spokesperson responded to the scathing Jan. 6 hearing by pumping out voter-fraud conspiracy theories

Liz Harrington, a spokesperson for former President Donald Trump, tweeted out election fraud disinformation during the Thursday's hearing.

She tweeted misleading claims that she said suggested voter fraud in some swing states during the 2020 election, and said: "They didn't want to talk about voter fraud then, and they don't want to talk about it now."

She did not engage directly with what was said at the hearings.


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Several Republicans including Scott Perry sought pardons from Trump after the Capitol riot, Liz Cheney says

Liz Cheney
Rep. Liz Cheney listens during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack on July 27, 2021.AP Photo/ Andrew Harnik)

Rep. Liz Cheney, the vice chair of the House January 6 committee, said at Thursday's hearing that several Republican members of Congress asked for a pardon from then-President Donald Trump after the Capitol riot.

She called out Rep. Scott Perry in particular, saying: "Representative Perry contacted the White House in the weeks after January 6 to seek a presidential pardon."

"Multiple other Republican congressmen also sought presidential pardons for their roles in attempting to overturn the 2020 election," she added.


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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says watching the January 6 hearings made all the trauma from the Capitol riot come 'rushing back into the body'

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said watching the first televised hearing on the Capitol riot took her back to the traumatic experience of being there on the day.

Ocasio-Cortez posted a video of the hearing, where scenes of violence and sights of Trump supporters flooding the Capitol were being played.

"Good Lord. The way it all comes rushing back into the body. It's like it's that day all over again," she wrote.


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A Proud Boy told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization 'tripled' after Trump told them to 'stand back and stand by'

Enrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.
Enrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//Getty

A high-ranking member of the Proud Boys told the January 6 panel that membership in the organization "tripled" after former President Donald Trump told them to "stand back and stand by."

Trump made the comments during a debate in September 2020. The former president was asked to disavow white supremacist groups and urge them to "stand down." But instead of doing so, Trump said: "Proud Boys, stand back and stand by."

A clip of an interview with Proud Boys member Jeremy Bertino aired during the televised January 6 hearings on Thursday night. He said Trump's comments were a watershed moment for the group.

Bertino was asked if the number of Proud Boys members increased specifically after Trump's comments.

"Exponentially," Bertino said. "I'd say, tripled, probably. With the potential for a lot more eventually."


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New video from the Capitol riot shows dozens of staffers fleeing Rep. Kevin McCarthy's office in a panic as rioters clashed violently with cops

Kevin McCarthy
House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA).Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The January 6 panel released a never-before-seen video from inside House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy's office during the January 6 Capitol riot.

In the video, the dozens of frantic staffers are seen pouring into the hallways of Rep. McCarthy's office.

The staffers appeared to be fleeing McCarthy's office as a radio transmission signaled that people would be moving through the tunnels of the Capitol building.

The House committee played the video during the first of six televised January 6 hearings. It pinpoints 2:28 p.m. — as violent clashes between rioters and police officers take place outside the Capitol, McCarthy staffers can be seen running through the hallway of his chambers.


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Ex-DC cop beaten by Jan. 6 rioters says it's time for America to 'wake the fuck up' to danger Trump poses

Former DC Metropolitan Police Officer Michael Fanone, who suffered a heart attack during the January 6 attack on the US Capitol, said on Friday that people need to "wake the fuck up" to the danger former President Donald Trump poses following the House select committee playing videos of what unfolded on that day.


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'I was slipping in people's blood,' says Capitol Police officer

Caroline Edwards
U.S. Capitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards, who was the first law enforcement officer injured by rioters storming the Capitol grounds on January 6, testifies during a hearing by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 09, 2022 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Capitol Police Officer Caroline Edwards said it looked to her like an "absolute war zone" on January 6, 2021, when supporters of former President Trump attacked the US Capitol, forcing officers to engage in "hours of hand-to-hand combat" beyond the scope of any law enforcement training.

Edwards, who was injured in the attack, told members of the House select committee on Thursday, "I can just remember my breath catching in my throat" while looking at the "carnage" and "chaos" of the riot scene.

"I couldn't believe my eyes," she told the committee. "There were officers on the ground. You know, they were bleeding, they were throwing up…I mean I saw friends with blood all over their faces. I was slipping in people's blood. You know, I was catching people as they fell."


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Ex-Proud Boys leader says he'd wished he'd sold 'stand back and standby' t-shirts after Trump's debate comment

Enrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.
Enrique Tarrio, former leader of the Proud Boys, speaks to Black Lives Matters supporters during a commemoration of the death of George Floyd in Miami on May 25, 2021.Eva Marie Uzcategui Trinkl//Getty

At the first of six public hearings planned for this month, the House committee displayed video of an interview with a Proud Boy who attributed Trump's comment to exponential membership growth in the far-right group.

In another interview, former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio cracked a wry smile and said he regretted not selling t-shirts brandished with the words "Stand back and stand by."

"One of the vendors on my page actually beat me to it, but I wish I would've made a 'stand back stand by' t-shirt," Tarrio said in his interview with the House committee.


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Jared Kushner testified that he thought the White House counsel's threat to resign was only 'whining'

President Trump in the Oval Office with Jared Kushner speaking behind him.
President Donald Trump listens as Jared Kushner speaks in the Oval Office of the White House on September 11, 2020.Andrew Harnik/AP Photo

 

Former Trump White House Senior Advisor Jared Kushner testified in front of the January 6 House Committee that he thought White House Counsel Pat Cipollone's threat to resign was nothing more than "whining."

"I know that him and the team were always saying, 'We're gonna resign, we're not gonna be here' if this happens, that happens," Kushner, who is also the former president's son-in-law, said during an on-camera deposition Thursday. "I kind of took it up to just be whining, to be honest with you."


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Liz Cheney blasts Republicans for supporting Trump: 'There will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain'

First January 6 select committee hearing
U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson, Chairman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, Vice Chairwoman Rep. Liz Cheney, and Rep. Adam Kinzinger take part in a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer/Getty Images

GOP Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming on Thursday evening issued members of her party a stark warning over their continued support of former President Donald Trump.

"I say this to my Republican colleagues who are defending the indefensible: there will come a day when Donald Trump is gone, but your dishonor will remain," Cheney, vice chair of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 Capitol riot, said during the panel's first hearing.


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White House aides tried to limit access to Trump knowing he was 'too dangerous to be left alone' after his election loss, Cheney says

Liz Cheney, Adam Kinzinger
Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) and Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL) during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Drew Angerer/Getty Images

"The White House staff knew that President Trump was willing to entertain and use conspiracy theories to achieve his ends," Rep. Cheney said during opening remarks at the first public hearing investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol.

"They knew that the president needed to be cut off from all of those who had encouraged him.  They knew that President Donald Trump was too dangerous to be left alone," she added.


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House Jan. 6 panel played footage of former AG William Barr calling Trump's election claims 'bullshit'

Attorney General William Barr speaks during a news conference, Monday, Dec. 21, 2020 at the Justice Department in Washington
Attorney General William Barr speaks during a news conference, Monday, Dec. 21, 2020 at the Justice Department in WashingtonMichael Reynolds/AP

Following the 2020 presidential election, then-Attorney General William Barr told Donald Trump that his claims of widespread election fraud were "bullshit" and entirely unsupported by evidence, it was revealed during the first January 6 committee public hearing.

Video of Barr recounting his remarks to Trump in a closed-door interview with the House committee investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol was played on June 9, 2022, during the public hearing.

Barr said he spoke with Trump on at least three occasions between November and December 2020, and he described Trump's claims of election malfeasance as "crazy stuff" and said the falsehoods were influencing the public, doing a "great, great disservice to the country." Barr credited the timing of his December 2020 resignation, in part, to Trump's baseless election claims.

 

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Ivanka Trump 'accepted' DOJ found no fraud that could overturn the 2020 election

Ivanka Trump
Ivanka Trump.Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Video testimony of part of Ivanka Trump's testimony to the January 6 committee was shown during the first public hearing of the investigation into the riots at the Capitol on January 6, 2021.

During the clip, Ivanka Trump was asked about then-Attorney General Bill Barr's statement that former President Donald Trump's claims that there was fraud in the 2020 election were incorrect.

"It affected my perspective," Ivanka Trump told the committee in recorded testimony, aired for the first time on Thursday. "I respect Attorney General Barr. So I accepted what he was saying."Read Full Story

Liz Cheney says Trump oversaw a 'sophisticated 7-part plan' to overturn the election and stay in power

Liz Cheney
U.S. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) Vice Chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, delivers remarks during a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 9, 2022.Win McNamee/Getty Images

Rep. Liz Cheney, one of two Republicans on the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, said that during these public hearings they would reveal more information about a "seven-part plan" to overturn the 2020 presidential election, led by former President Donald Trump.

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Rep. Liz Cheney: Trump backed supporters' call to 'hang Mike Pence'

Liz Cheney arrives at hearing
US Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY), vice chairwoman of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the US Capitol, arrives for a hearing on the January 6th investigation on June 09, 2022 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Win McNamee/Getty Images

As a riot unfolded at the US Capitol, former President Donald Trump told aides that his own vice president might deserve to die, Rep. Liz Cheney said Thursday.

Cheney, a Wyoming Republican who co-chairs the House panel investigating the January 6 insurrection, made the claim in her opening remarks.

"Aware of the rioters chants to 'hang Mike Pence,'" Cheney said, "the president responded with this sentiment: 'Maybe our supporters have the right idea.' Mike Pence 'deserves it.'"

As The New York Times reported last month, two former White House staffers testified before the January 6 committee that Mark Meadows, Trump's ex-chief of staff, told them that he heard the former president make the comment.


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January 6 committee chairman Bennie Thompson says hearings will show Trump and his allies mounted 'an attempted coup'

 

Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat in his 13th term, recalled his upbringing in the Magnolia State and the nation's history of white supremacist violence, specifically lynching.

"I'm from a part of the country where people justify the actions of slavery, the Ku Klux Klan, and lynching," Thompson said. "I'm reminded of that dark history as I hear voices today try and justify the actions of the insurrections on Jan. 6, 2021."

The chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection at the US Capitol described the rioters as "domestic enemies of the Constitution," and promised that the evidence his panel has collected proves former President Donald Trump and his allies attempted a coup d'etat.

"Donald Trump was at the center of this conspiracy, and ultimately, Donald Trump, the President of the United States, spurred a mob of domestic enemies of the Constitution to march down the Capitol and subvert American democracy," Rep. Bennie Thompson said at the start of Thursday night's prime-time hearings.


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House Jan. 6 committee chair will say 'democracy remains in danger'

Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., right, and Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., are seen after the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol
From left to right, January 6 Select Committee members Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss. Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., and Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Bennie Thompson, the chairman of the House panel investigating the January 6 attack, will say tonight that the American people deserve answers about the insurrection.

"We can't sweep what happened under the rug," Thompson says in early excerpts of his opening statement. "The American people deserve answers. So I come before you this evening not as a Democrat, but as an American who swore an oath to defend the Constitution."

The House Select Committee on January 6 will have its first major public hearing tonight, kicking off a series of public hearings about the attack, efforts to overturn the election, and what then-President Donald Trump was aware of in the lead up to it.

Thompson will add that American democracy "remains in danger."

"... Our work must do much more than just look backwards," Thompson will say. "Because our democracy remains in danger. The conspiracy to thwart the will of the people is not over. There are those in this country who thirst for power but have no love or respect for what makes America great: devotion to the Constitution, allegiance to the rule of law, our shared journey to build a more perfect Union."

Thompson, a Mississippi Democrat, is facing a defining career moment after nearly three decades in Congress. Thompson told Insider's Camila DeChalus that the committee is his "signature work in the United States House of Representatives."

Bennie Thompson is poised to take center stage as Jan. 6 hearings start after 29 years in Congress

bennie thompson
House Homeland Security Committee Chair Benny Thompson (D-MS) listens as U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) discusses the formation of a select committee to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol during a news conference in Washington, U.S., July 1, 2021.Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

Rep. Bennie Thompson is the chairman of the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021 insurrection. He has been in Congress for 29 years but views this investigation as his "signature work."

"There's a lot of other pieces of legislation that basically alter the trajectory of so many people in my district, in this country, as well as other pieces of legislation, but nothing compares to the importance of this committee and why I value its work as my signature work in the United States House of Representatives," he told Insider's Camila DeChalus in a May interview.

In the first public hearing of the January 6 committee, Thompson will take center stage.


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Sen. Ted Cruz says watching paint dry would be more productive than tuning into a single second of the January 6 committee's first public hearing

Ted Cruz
Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) holds up a cellphone during the confirmation for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett on the third day before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on October 14, 2020 in Washington, DC.ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas offered up three things he'd rather do Thursday night than sit through any part of the January 6 committee's highly anticipated prime-time hearing.

"I've got to mow my lawn. Or comb my hair. Or maybe just watch the paint dry on the walls," Cruz said of what he considered better ways to invest one's time than validating the existence of  "a political campaign ad for the Democrats."

Cruz bashed the ongoing House investigation as political theater meant to distract a recession-wary populace from all the ways he said President Joe Biden and congressional Democrats have failed them.

"From the opening gavel to the close of the hearing, one hundred percent of their endeavor is a political Hail Mary pass," Cruz told Insider in the tunnels beneath the Senate chamber. "The American people are deeply unhappy with the disaster of the left-wing policy agenda we've seen for the last two years."


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DOJ lawyers expect transcripts from the 1,000 January 6 committee witnesses to be made public in September

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Trump supporters clash with police and security forces as in the US Capitol on January 6, 2021.Brent Stirton/Getty Images

A Justice Department lawyer revealed Thursday that transcripts of the 1,000 interviews conducted as part of the House January 6 committee's investigation into the Capitol attack will be made public in September. It would be an unprecedented release of documents that could shed new light on the January 6, 2021 insurrection.

The revelation came during a pretrial hearing for former Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio and four other members of the far-right group who were charged with seditious conspiracy in connection with their alleged role in planning and participating in the Capitol siege.

"The committee will release the transcripts in early September and a report of the committee's findings will be released around the same time," Assistant US Attorney Jason McCullough told a judge.


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The first public hearing held by House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, insurrection starts at 8 p.m. ET. Catch up on what you need to know ahead of the hearing.

Bennie Thompson Liz Cheney
Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Mississippi), left, listens as Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyoming) speaks during the House select committee hearing on the Jan. 6 attack in Washington, DC, on July 27, 2021. Washington Metropolitan Police Department officer Michael Fanone is at center.Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via AP, Pool

The House select committee investigating the January 6 insurrection is holding a much-anticipated public hearing Thursday night.

The nine-member panel, chaired by Rep. Bennie Thompson, a Democrat from Mississippi, has spent months interviewing witnesses and examining phone and email records to try to get to the bottom of former President Donald Trump and his allies' efforts to overturn the 2020 election and prevent President Joe Biden from taking office.

The committee, which includes Republican Reps. Liz Cheney of Wyoming and Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, is expected to hold a half-dozen public hearings in June.

Here's what you need to know ahead of the broadcast at 8 p.m. ET:

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