Local Infectious Disease Specialist Answers Common Coronavirus Questions

The questions about COVID-19 keep coming, so CBS 11 took some of them to an infectious disease specialist at Texas Health Resources, Dr. Nikhil Bhayani.

  • Trump offers competing coronavirus messaging, warning of death but lamenting lockdown
    Yahoo News

    Trump offers competing coronavirus messaging, warning of death but lamenting lockdown

    President Trump appeared frustrated that the country would not emerge from its coronavirus lockdown in the near future even as he and other officials warned of a rising death toll and a continuance of restrictive measures for weeks and maybe months to come. There will be death,” Trump warned flatly at one point during Saturday's briefing of the White House coronavirus task force. More than 8,000 people in the United States have died from COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

  • Why does the coronavirus affect people differently? Yahoo News Explains
    Yahoo News

    Why does the coronavirus affect people differently? Yahoo News Explains

    Coronavirus patients are showing a wide range of symptoms and the exact reason why is still a mystery — but we do have some clues as to what factors can influence the severity of the disease. While the most common symptoms are fever, cough and shortness of breath, there are numerous reports of coronavirus patients experiencing nonrespiratory symptoms. A study of 204 patients in Huabie, China, published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology found that just over half of patients experienced gastrointestinal symptoms such as loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

  • Televangelist Kenneth Copeland 'blows wind of God' at coronavirus and claims pandemic is 'destroyed' in sermon
    The Independent

    Televangelist Kenneth Copeland 'blows wind of God' at coronavirus and claims pandemic is 'destroyed' in sermon

    American televangelist Kenneth Copeland, who recently claimed that the coronavirus pandemic will be "over much sooner you think" because "Christian people all over this country praying have overwhelmed it," has summoned the "wind of God" to destroy the novel coronavirus during a recent sermon. In a sermon last month, the pastor "executed judgment" on Covid-19, which he declared "finished" and "over" and made the US "healed and well again."

  • An Illinois man allegedly shot his wife then himself over coronavirus fears
    Business Insider

    An Illinois man allegedly shot his wife then himself over coronavirus fears

    Police say Patrick Jesernik shot his wife Cheryl Jesernik, then himself, on Thursday. Experts predicted the stresses of the pandemic and lockdown could lead to an uptick in domestic violence. On Thursday evening, police responded to a wellbeing check at the couple's home, where they found Patrick Jesernik, 54, and Cheryl Schriefer, 59, dead, NBC Chicago reported. An autopsy found that each died from a single gunshot wound to the head.

  • Biden says removal of Navy captain who sounded alarm on coronavirus 'close to criminal'
    NBC News

    Biden says removal of Navy captain who sounded alarm on coronavirus 'close to criminal'

    Former Vice President Joe Biden said Sunday that the Navy's decision to remove the captain who sounded the alarm on coronavirus cases aboard his ship is "close to criminal." "I think it's close to criminal the way they're dealing with this guy," Biden said on ABC News' "This Week." The Navy announced Thursday that it had relieved Capt. Brett Crozier of his post commanding the USS Theodore Roosevelt, an aircraft carrier with a crew of nearly 5,000.

  • Number of coronavirus intensive care patients in Italy drops for first time
    Reuters

    Number of coronavirus intensive care patients in Italy drops for first time

    Italy reported its lowest daily rise in COVID-19 deaths for nearly two weeks on Saturday and said the number of patients in intensive care had fallen for the first time. The Civil Protection department reported 681 deaths, bringing the total to 15,632 since the outbreak of the new coronavirus epidemic in northern Italy on Feb. 21. The total number of confirmed cases rose to 124,632 from 119,827 reported on Friday but for the first time, the number of patients in badly stretched intensive care units fell, with 3,994 patients being treated, down 74 from 4,068 on Friday.

  • Iran to restart 'low-risk' economic activities soon
    AFP

    Iran to restart 'low-risk' economic activities soon

    Iran said Sunday it will allow "low-risk" economic activities to resume from April 11 as its daily coronavirus infection rates slowed for a fifth straight day. "Restarting these activities does not mean we have abandoned the principle of staying at home," President Hassan Rouhani said at a meeting of Iran's anti-coronavirus task force. The president, whose country has been battered by US economic sanctions, did not specify what qualified as "low risk" activities, but said bans would remain on schools and large gatherings.

  • US sees coronavirus window to push Taiwan's global status
    Associated Press

    US sees coronavirus window to push Taiwan's global status

    The Trump administration is seizing the opportunity of the coronavirus pandemic to push a cause that has long been an irritant in U.S. relations with China: Taiwan. The virus has added yet another dimension to U.S.-China tensions that were already wracked by a trade war and heated discussions over intellectual property, human rights and Chinese policies in Hong Kong and the South China Sea. And, while U.S.-China differences over Taiwan have waxed and waned for decades, they have persisted and are reaching new heights as the world grapples with the exponential spread of the COVID-19 virus.

  • Former FDA commissioner expects New York health-care system will be pushed to the brink, but 'won't go over'
    The Week

    Former FDA commissioner expects New York health-care system will be pushed to the brink, but 'won't go over'

    Former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb has issued some dire warnings since the early days of the novel COVID-19 coronavirus, but on Sunday he indicated some steps taken by the U.S. federal government and states might be paying off — both in terms of curbing the spread and preparing the health-care system for an onslaught of patients. New York City remains the epicenter of the U.S. outbreak, and its hospitals are struggling. Gottlieb reiterated the predication made by numerous officials that the city, and New York state, are on the verge of peaking next week, which will undoubtedly stretch the health-care system thin.

  • Face masks: How the Trump administration went from 'no need' to 'put one on' to fight coronavirus
    Yahoo News

    Face masks: How the Trump administration went from 'no need' to 'put one on' to fight coronavirus

    Testifying on Capitol Hill on Feb. 28, Dr. Robert Redfield could not be more clear. “There is no need for these masks in the community,” Dr. Redfield said of the N95 masks that were then becoming the subject of intense focus, with the coronavirus outbreak having arrived on the West Coast of the United States. Coming from the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, this pronouncement had the weight of an official directive.

  • No Probe on Trump’s Early Virus Response, House Democrat Says
    Bloomberg

    No Probe on Trump’s Early Virus Response, House Democrat Says

    House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn said it's unlikely a congressional panel overseeing coronavirus relief will investigate the Trump administration's initial response to the pandemic that's claimed thousands of American lives. This committee will be forward-looking,” Clyburn told CNN's Jake Tapper on “State of the Union. We're not going to be looking back on what the president may or may not have done back before this crisis hit.

  • When Coronavirus Is Over, Middle East Chaos Will Only Be Worse
    The Daily Beast

    When Coronavirus Is Over, Middle East Chaos Will Only Be Worse

    For a time the Middle East seemed like it just froze, the conflicts of yesterday put in quarantine—as so many of us have been—while various countries strive to contain an epidemic of biblical scale. The coronavirus outbreak is not the great equalizer, nor is it the crisis in which past rivalries will be forgotten. Like an earthquake, the coronavirus is magnifying the foundational weaknesses of the least prepared countries, exacerbating existing inequalities across the region.

  • Trump: U.S. approaching period ‘that is going to be very horrendous’
    Yahoo News Video

    Trump: U.S. approaching period ‘that is going to be very horrendous’

    President Trump on Saturday said that the United States is approaching a time that will be “very horrendous” for the nation amid the growing coronavirus outbreak across the country.

  • Thousands of applicants, zero loans: Trump's small businesses lending program is a failure to launch
    NBC News

    Thousands of applicants, zero loans: Trump's small businesses lending program is a failure to launch

    One day after the launch of a $350 billion loan program designed to rescue millions of small businesses pummeled by the coronavirus pandemic, technical glitches continued to cripple the ability of the nation's top lenders to begin processing the loans, throwing into doubt when any of the applicants will start receiving any money. The lending program, which forms part of the $2 trillion Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act, is a much-needed lifeline for the 30 million small businesses across the country. “We are all waiting on the Small Business Administration,” a Chase senior executive told NBC News.

  • China sees rises in new coronavirus cases, asymptomatic patients
    Reuters

    China sees rises in new coronavirus cases, asymptomatic patients

    Mainland China reported 39 new coronavirus cases as of Sunday, up from 30 a day earlier, and the number of asymptomatic cases also surged, as Beijing continued to struggle to extinguish the outbreak despite drastic containment efforts. The National Health Commission said in a statement on Monday that 78 new asymptomatic cases had been identified as of the end of the day on Sunday, compared with 47 the day before. Imported cases and asymptomatic patients, who have the virus and can give it to others but show no symptoms, have become China's chief concern in recent weeks after draconian containment measures succeeded in slashing the infection rate.

  • Italy, Spain, and France reported declines in daily coronavirus death tolls. Their governments don't plan to lift national lockdowns and social distancing rules anytime soon.
    Business Insider

    Italy, Spain, and France reported declines in daily coronavirus death tolls. Their governments don't plan to lift national lockdowns and social distancing rules anytime soon.

    Andrea Pattaro/AFP via Getty Images Italy, Spain, and France each reported slight declines in daily coronavirus death tolls on Sunday. The three countries responded to the coronavirus with strict national lockdowns in early to mid-March, and they have no imminent plans to loosen those restrictions. During an appearance on NBC's "Meet the Press," Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte reminded his country that social distancing "is the only way to defeat the pandemic altogether" and pleaded, "Stay home as much possible.

  • 'Complete collapse of economies' ahead as Africa faces virus
    Associated Press

    'Complete collapse of economies' ahead as Africa faces virus

    Some of Uganda's poorest people used to work here, on the streets of Kampala, as fruit sellers sitting on the pavement or as peddlers of everything from handkerchiefs to roasted peanuts. Now they're gone and no one knows when they will return, victims of a global economic crisis linked to the coronavirus that could wipe out jobs for millions across the African continent, many who live hand-to-mouth with zero savings.

  • Jordan becomes latest Mideast country to deploy drones in virus response
    AFP

    Jordan becomes latest Mideast country to deploy drones in virus response

    Jordan on Sunday started to deploy drones to fight the coronavirus pandemic, joining a host of Middle East countries using the technology to enforce curfews, deliver public health announcements and even monitor people's temperatures. Jordan has declared five deaths and 323 cases of COVID-19 and says it has arrested at least 1,600 people for violating a nationwide curfew in force since last month. "The armed forces and security services will ensure the curfew is being respected by using modern technology such as drones and surveillance cameras," Minister of State for Information, Amjad al-Adayleh, told a press briefing late Saturday.

  • Health experts say official U.S. coronavirus death toll is understated
    The Week

    Health experts say official U.S. coronavirus death toll is understated

    Public health experts and government officials agree that the U.S. government's coronavirus death toll almost certainly understates how many Americans have actually died from the virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention only counts deaths where the presence of the coronavirus is confirmed in a lab test, The Washington Post reports, and "we know that it is an underestimation," CDC spokeswoman Kristen Nordlund said. The official death count is based on reports sent by states, and as of Sunday night, the CDC reports 304,826 confirmed U.S. cases and 7,616 deaths.

  • World Suffers Under the Grip of a Deadly Pandemic: Weekend Reads
    Bloomberg

    World Suffers Under the Grip of a Deadly Pandemic: Weekend Reads

    With the U.S. now the clear epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak and poised to enter its most challenging week yet, President Donald Trump's administration still faces charges from state and local officials that it's not doing enough to ensure lives aren't lost unnecessarily. The virus is still ravaging Europe, and talks are under way over how to help the continent's most vulnerable economies recover. And in China, preparations are being made to re-open Wuhan, the original site of the outbreak, even as a second wave of infections threatens Asian urban centers.

  • Here's the biggest news you missed this weekend
    USA TODAY

    Here's the biggest news you missed this weekend

    Empty churches marked the start of Holy Week with Palm Sunday ceremonies. More than 331,000 cases of coronavirus have been confirmed in the United States, according to the John Hopkins database, with the death toll nearing 10,000 on Sunday. Globally, there are more than 1,260,000 confirmed cases, 68,400 deaths and 258,000 recovered.

  • A Tiger at the Bronx Zoo Has Tested Positive for Coronavirus
    Time

    A Tiger at the Bronx Zoo Has Tested Positive for Coronavirus

    A tiger at the Bronx Zoo in New York City has tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 in people, according to the United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Veterinary Services Laboratories. The big cat is thought to be the first tiger infected with the virus, according to the USDA. The tiger was tested for the virus after several of the zoo's lions and tigers started showing signs of respiratory illness, according to the USDA.

  • Does Iran's coronavirus crisis raise the risk of war?
    Yahoo News 360

    Does Iran's coronavirus crisis raise the risk of war?

    This same motivation may push Iran to accelerate its pursuit of a nuclear weapon, which could risk retaliation from the U.S. Members of the Trump administration may see Iran's weakened state as an opportunity to be more aggressive in its “maximum pressure campaign” against the country, some experts say. Any actions on America's part risk prompting an escalating response from Iran. Others say the pandemic presents a chance for the two countries to improve their relationship and step back from the brink of open conflict.

  • Americans play the 'waiting game' after last passenger plane from Moscow canceled
    NBC News

    Americans play the 'waiting game' after last passenger plane from Moscow canceled

    A teacher whose father is suffering from cancer is one of scores of American citizens trapped in Russia after the last passenger flight to the U.S. was canceled amid the coronavirus pandemic. Grace Mitchell, 26, told NBC News that she had had no plans to leave her home in Rostov-on-Don in southern Russia until she got a phone call from her mother saying her father's cancer had taken a turn for the worse. "All we could do, really, was try to get the last flight out of Russia, because if I don't get a flight soon, then I probably won't see my dad ever again," Mitchell said.

  • Lebanese stranded abroad by coronavirus outbreak return home
    Reuters

    Lebanese stranded abroad by coronavirus outbreak return home

    Several flights carrying Lebanese stranded abroad by coronavirus lockdowns began arriving in Beirut on Sunday, part of a trial run to see whether thousands looking to come home can be safely repatriated without worsening the country's outbreak. Their return became a charged issue after powerful parliament speaker Nabih Berri threatened to suspend support for the government if it did not act quickly and other top figures urged immediate action. Lebanon's crippling financial crisis including tight capital controls has complicated the plight of Lebanese stuck abroad, with tough restrictions on accessing cash.