Pfizer says its vaccine is 100% effective for younger teens

The announcement came Wednesday morning from Pfizer and BioNTech that a study shows their COVID-19 vaccine is 100% effective against the virus in children ages 12 to 15.

Video Transcript

- --releasing the results of a trial that shows its vaccine is 100% effective in young people ages 12 to 15. Action News reporter Katherine Scott has details and reaction.

KATHERINE SCOTT: This was a relatively small study, but the results were promising. Some parents and guardians we spoke to have concerns, others feel hopeful. The announcement came down this morning from Pfizer and BioNTech that a study shows their vaccine is 100% effective against the virus in children ages 12 to 15. In the coming weeks, Pfizer plans to ask the FDA to allow emergency use of the shots, starting at age 12 before the fall.

JON COOPER: I was thrilled beyond belief, not the least of which because my wife and I have two 15-year-old kids at home.

KATHERINE SCOTT: Dr. Jon Cooper of Colonial School District in Delaware is the district's COVID point person.

JON COOPER: We're right now in the process of building our programming for the fall. And we know that we're going to have to have a range of options. We hope what this will mean is that more parents will be willing to send their children in person for the fall.

KATHERINE SCOTT: Right now, all 15 Colonial School District schools have in-person learning options, with elementary and middle schools operating five days a week. About 60% of district families have remained remote.

JON COOPER: So the idea that we're starting to get a sense now that this might be available, I think it's going to help people formulate their plans, especially parents.

KATHERINE SCOTT: A poll from WebMD earlier this month finds that 53% of parents with children between the ages of 12 and 16 plan to get their teens and preteens vaccinated within a year of approval for the age group, with fewer than one in five saying they would not.

ELAINE RAVENELL: I'm not comfortable with her taking it because, to me, is has not been tested long enough.

JOSH VANNAARDEN: My kids are part of Lower Merion School District. In order to keep the community safe and to keep our kids safe, you have to go with the science.

KATHERINE SCOTT: The study will continue to track the kids for two years for more information on long term protection and safety. In Winfield Heights, Katherine Scott, Channel 6 Action News.