CNBC’s Cramer thinks U.S. ‘can walk away from the table’ on China trade deal after jobs report. Here’s how other stock-market experts see it

Mark DeCambre
CNBC’s Cramer thinks U.S. ‘can walk away from the table’ on China trade deal after jobs report. Here’s how other stock-market experts see it

Some market participants are starting to contemplate the notion that stellar employment figures could help embolden U.S. trade negotiators in a protracted tariff dispute between the U.S. and China—possibly resulting in a delay if not outright scuttling of a long-sought-after resolution. Indeed, a key report of the week from the Labor Department report showed that the U.S. economy created 266,000 new jobs in November, according to the Labor Department, the biggest gain since January and the unemployment rate slipped to 3.5%, a 50-year low. “This positive number could delay any US/China trade agreement, as signs of a stronger US economy will embolden US negotiators,” wrote Chris Gaffney, president of World Markets at TIAA Bank, in a research note after the nonfarm-payrolls report on Friday.