Executive Privilege Should Have No Power When It Comes to an Impeachment

Jonathan Shaub
Executive Privilege Should Have No Power When It Comes to an Impeachment

The House has now begun the public phase of its impeachment process. The White House argued that the Constitution’s separation of powers prohibits Congress from requiring close presidential advisers, such as Mulvaney and Eisenberg, to testify, and prohibits Congress from requiring any executive-branch official to appear for a deposition without a government lawyer present, two “prophylactic” constitutional doctrines—one old and one new—that the executive branch says are necessary to protect executive privilege.