‘Makes no sense’: Sandra Bullock says she is ‘still embarrassed’ about one of her films

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Sandra Bullock has reflected on her film career, and singled out one movie she is “still embarrassed” about doing.

The 57-year-old actor recently announced that she is taking a break from acting to be with her family. But first, she is looking back on her career regrets.

During an interview alongside her The Lost City co-star Daniel Radcliffe for TooFab, Bullock said: “I have one [film that] no one came around to and I’m still embarrassed I was in. It’s called Speed 2...

“Makes no sense. Slow boat. Slowly going towards an island.”

She added: “That’s one I wished I hadn’t done and no fans came around that I know of.”

Bullock and Keanu Reeves starred together in the original 1994 action film Speed, about an officer in the Los Angeles Police Department’s Swat team who has to prevent a bomb exploding on a city bus by keeping its speed above 50mph.

Bullock returned for the 1997 sequel, Speed 2: Cruise Control, with Jason Patric taking over the leading role as officer Alex Shaw in the film, which sees the action play out on a luxury cruise ship.

Jason Patric and Sandra Bullock in ‘Speed 2’ (Ron Phillips/20th Century Fox/Kobal/Shutterstock)
Jason Patric and Sandra Bullock in ‘Speed 2’ (Ron Phillips/20th Century Fox/Kobal/Shutterstock)

Reeves explained his choice not to reprise his role for the sequel in an interview last year, saying: “An ocean liner?... I had the feeling it wasn’t right.”

Speed 2: Cruise Control did not receive the same positive feedback as its predecessor. On Rotten Tomatoes, the film has an approval rating of four per cent, and the website’s consensus reads: “Speed 2 falls far short of its predecessor, thanks to laughable dialogue, thin characterisation, unsurprisingly familiar plot devices, and action sequences that fail to generate any excitement.”