A man left paralyzed in an Uber crash is suing the company for $63 million, saying his driver had at least 20 citations and never should have been hired

·2 min read
Uber
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  • A man left paralyzed when his Uber ride crashed last year is suing the company for $63 million.

  • The 31-year-old says his driver had at least 20 citations and once took a driver-retraining course.

  • Uber was negligent in hiring the driver despite his extensive record, the Massachusetts man alleges.

A Massachusetts man is suing Uber for $63 million after a trip he booked with the ride-hailing service ended in a crash that left him paralyzed.

William Good filed the lawsuit on Tuesday, alleging that Uber was negligent in hiring his driver, whom he said had an "alarming" driving history that included at least 20 citations. The Boston Globe first reported the news.

Good used Uber on April 30 to get a ride home from the restaurant where he worked, the complaint said. His driver's speed was "so fast as to be noticeably frightening," and the vehicle crashed into a parked car, the complaint said.

Good hit his head on the passenger seat's headrest, slumped over, and "knew immediately he was paralyzed." The 31-year-old sustained injuries that left him a quadriplegic.

"It's a level of incapability that I'm at," Good told The Boston Globe. "That was kind of the real heartbreak part, just coming to terms with these things I hadn't thought of yet."

The Uber driver's record shows at least 20 driving citations dating back to 1996, including some for failure to stop or yield, and he was previously required by the state to take a driver-retraining course, the lawsuit said.

It also said that Uber knew or should have known that the driver "posed an unreasonable risk to riders in his vehicle, including Plaintiff Good, as well as other drivers, pedestrians and cyclists, given his extensive driving history and prior driver re-training." It added that "under no circumstances" should the driver "have been hired as a professional driver by the Defendant Uber."

Uber declined to comment because of pending litigation, but it told Insider that potential drivers in Massachusetts go through a two-part screening that checks their motor-vehicle records and criminal offenses at the local, state, and federal level and involves a state-managed background check. Uber said drivers were rescreened at least every six months.

Good is seeking a jury trial and $63 million in damages for extraordinary pain and suffering; permanent disability; loss of enjoyment of life; physical, mental, and emotional injuries; and medical, psychological, financial, and economic damages.

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